Grade (climbing)

gradeclimbing gradegradedgradesgrade IClass 3class 2PDIIInternational French Adjectival System
In rock climbing, mountaineering, and other climbing disciplines, climbers give a grade to a climbing route or boulder problem, intended to describe concisely the difficulty and danger of climbing it.wikipedia
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Climbing route

routeroutesclimbing routes
In rock climbing, mountaineering, and other climbing disciplines, climbers give a grade to a climbing route or boulder problem, intended to describe concisely the difficulty and danger of climbing it. Different types of climbing (such as sport climbing, bouldering or ice climbing) each have their own grading systems, and many nationalities developed their own, distinctive grading systems.
Routes can vary dramatically in difficulty and grade; once committed to that ascent, it can sometimes be difficult to stop or return.

Rock climbing

rock climberrock climbersrock-climbing
In rock climbing, mountaineering, and other climbing disciplines, climbers give a grade to a climbing route or boulder problem, intended to describe concisely the difficulty and danger of climbing it. Different types of climbing (such as sport climbing, bouldering or ice climbing) each have their own grading systems, and many nationalities developed their own, distinctive grading systems.
Over time, grading systems have also been created in order to compare more accurately the relative difficulties of the rock climbs.

Sport climbing

sport climberclimbingsport climbers
In rock climbing, mountaineering, and other climbing disciplines, climbers give a grade to a climbing route or boulder problem, intended to describe concisely the difficulty and danger of climbing it. Different types of climbing (such as sport climbing, bouldering or ice climbing) each have their own grading systems, and many nationalities developed their own, distinctive grading systems.
The Ewbank rating system, used in Australia, New Zealand, and South Africa, is a numerical open-ended system, starting from 1, which you can (at least in theory) walk up, up to 38 (as of 2013).

El Capitan

El Capitánfamous Yosemite cliffrock formation
For example, the North America Wall on El Capitan would be classed "VI, 5.8, A5[2]".
Todd Skinner and Paul Piana made the first free ascent over 9 days in 1988, after 30 days of working the route (graded 5.13b on the Yosemite Decimal System).

Alpine route

routeroutes
On long routes it is often used in the Alps and Himalaya.
Some routes require climbing skills of minor levels of difficulty (I and II according to UIAA).

Free climbing

free climbfreefree climbed
For free climbing, there are many different grading systems varying according to country.
Ratings on the hardest climbs tend to be speculative, until other climbers have had a chance to complete the routes and a consensus can be reached on the precise grade.

Saxon Switzerland climbing region

Saxon Switzerlandclimbing areasclimbing areas in Saxon Switzerland
The Saxon grading system (Sächsische Skala) is used in the Free State of Saxony in Germany and in a derivative form in some areas in the Czech Republic under the name . It was developed in the beginning of the 20th century for the formidable Saxon Switzerland climbing region and was gradually adopted within other climbing areas in the region, such as Bohemian Switzerland, Bohemian Paradise, Lusatian Mountains, and the Zittau Mountains.
Eine weitere Besonderheit ist die Verwendung einer eigenen Schwierigkeitsskala zur Einstufung der Kletterwege, die mit römischen Ziffern geschrieben wird.

Wojciech Kurtyka

Kurtyka
Famous climber and alpinist Wojciech Kurtyka proposed an extension to the scale.
He is also an inventor (around 1980) of the local Polish grading system of free climbs.

Glossary of climbing terms

on-sightonsightexposure
The adjectival grade attempts to assess the overall difficulty of the climb – taking into account all factors which lend difficulty to a pitch including technical difficulty, sustainedness, protection quality, rock quality, exposure and other less tangible aspects – for a climber leading the route on sight in traditional style.
Intended as an objective measure of the technical difficulty of a particular climb or bouldering problem. More often is highly subjective, however.

Mount Whitney

Mt. Whitneyhighesttallest mountain in the contiguous United States
The East Buttress route on Mt. Whitney is a grade III, yet it requires 1,000 feet of technical climbing and a total gain of over 6,000 vertical feet from trail head to summit.
The "Mountaineer's Route", a gully on the north side of the east face first climbed by John Muir, is considered a scramble, (PD+).

Ben Nevis

a mountain in ScotlandNevis
In August 2008, MacLeod completed a new project close to Tower Ridge on Ben Nevis called 'Echo Wall'.
It is not technically demanding (its grade is Difficult), and most pitches can be tackled unroped by competent climbers, but it is committing and very exposed.

John Ewbank (climber)

John EwbankEwbankEwbanks
The Ewbank system, used in Australia, New Zealand, and South Africa, was developed in the mid 1960s by John Ewbank.
He is best known for his development of the Ewbank System, used in Australia, New Zealand and South Africa for grading climbs.

Crux (climbing)

cruxcruxes
VS 4a might indicate very poor protection (easy moves, but no gear) or extremely sustained (every move is 4a and the climbing is steep/strenuous whilst reasonably protected), while VS 5b would usually indicate one crux move of 5b that is the first move or very well protected and the rest of the climb without much difficulty.
The grade of a climbing route is based on the difficulty of the crux.

Yosemite Decimal System

YDSclass 3Class 2 scramble
The class 5 portion of the class scale is primarily a rock climbing classification system, while classes 1–2 are used mainly in hiking and trail running.

Grade (bouldering)

gradedgrade in bouldering8a
Grades in bouldering
The open-ended numerical system ranges from to, but problems easier than are rarely found.

Degree of difficulty

chip shotdifficultydifficulty level
Degree of difficulty
Grade (climbing)

Mountaineering

mountaineermountain climbingmountain climber
In rock climbing, mountaineering, and other climbing disciplines, climbers give a grade to a climbing route or boulder problem, intended to describe concisely the difficulty and danger of climbing it. Different types of climbing (such as sport climbing, bouldering or ice climbing) each have their own grading systems, and many nationalities developed their own, distinctive grading systems.

Climbing

climberclimbersrock climbing
In rock climbing, mountaineering, and other climbing disciplines, climbers give a grade to a climbing route or boulder problem, intended to describe concisely the difficulty and danger of climbing it. Different types of climbing (such as sport climbing, bouldering or ice climbing) each have their own grading systems, and many nationalities developed their own, distinctive grading systems.

Bouldering

bouldererboulderersboulder
In rock climbing, mountaineering, and other climbing disciplines, climbers give a grade to a climbing route or boulder problem, intended to describe concisely the difficulty and danger of climbing it. Different types of climbing (such as sport climbing, bouldering or ice climbing) each have their own grading systems, and many nationalities developed their own, distinctive grading systems.

Ice climbing

ice climberice climbersice-climbing
In rock climbing, mountaineering, and other climbing disciplines, climbers give a grade to a climbing route or boulder problem, intended to describe concisely the difficulty and danger of climbing it. Different types of climbing (such as sport climbing, bouldering or ice climbing) each have their own grading systems, and many nationalities developed their own, distinctive grading systems.

Climbing protection

protectionprotectbolts
There are a number of factors that contribute to the difficulty of a climb, including the technical difficulty of the moves, the strength, stamina and level of commitment required, and the difficulty of protecting the climber.

First ascent

first ascentsfirst climbedfirst free ascent
They may be the opinion of one or a few climbers, often the first ascensionist or the author(s) of a guidebook.

Pierre Allain

This "Welzenbach scale" was adopted in 1935 by French mountaineers like Lucien Devies, Pierre Allain and Armand Charlet for routes in the Western Alps and finally in 1947 in Chamonix by the Union Internationale des Associations d'Alpinisme.

Armand Charlet

This "Welzenbach scale" was adopted in 1935 by French mountaineers like Lucien Devies, Pierre Allain and Armand Charlet for routes in the Western Alps and finally in 1947 in Chamonix by the Union Internationale des Associations d'Alpinisme.

Western Alps

western Alpine summits
This "Welzenbach scale" was adopted in 1935 by French mountaineers like Lucien Devies, Pierre Allain and Armand Charlet for routes in the Western Alps and finally in 1947 in Chamonix by the Union Internationale des Associations d'Alpinisme.