Grand Central Terminal

Grand Central StationGrand CentralTerminal CityVanderbilt HallGrand Central DepotGrand Central MarketNew YorkNew York (Grand Central Terminal)Grand Central NorthGrand Central Station (New York City)
Grand Central Terminal (GCT; also referred to as Grand Central Station or simply as Grand Central) is a commuter rail terminal located at 42nd Street and Park Avenue in Midtown Manhattan, New York City.wikipedia
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Midtown Manhattan

MidtownEast MidtownMidtown East
Grand Central Terminal (GCT; also referred to as Grand Central Station or simply as Grand Central) is a commuter rail terminal located at 42nd Street and Park Avenue in Midtown Manhattan, New York City.
Midtown is home to some of the city's most iconic buildings, including the Empire State Building, the Chrysler Building, the Hudson Yards Redevelopment Project, the headquarters of the United Nations, Grand Central Terminal, and Rockefeller Center, as well as Broadway and Times Square.

Harlem Line

HarlemHarlem DivisionUpper Harlem Division
Grand Central is the southern terminus of the Metro-North Railroad's Harlem, Hudson and New Haven Lines, serving the northern parts of the New York metropolitan area.
The lower 53 miles (86 km) from Grand Central Terminal to Southeast, in Putnam County, is electrified with a third rail and has at least two tracks.

New Haven Line

New HavenTrain to the Gamerail line
Grand Central is the southern terminus of the Metro-North Railroad's Harlem, Hudson and New Haven Lines, serving the northern parts of the New York metropolitan area.
There it joins the Harlem Line, where trains continue south to Grand Central Terminal in Manhattan.

42nd Street (Manhattan)

42nd StreetWest 42nd Street42nd
Grand Central Terminal (GCT; also referred to as Grand Central Station or simply as Grand Central) is a commuter rail terminal located at 42nd Street and Park Avenue in Midtown Manhattan, New York City.
The street is the site of some of New York's best known buildings, including (east to west) the headquarters of the United Nations, Chrysler Building, Grand Central Terminal, New York Public Library Main Branch, Times Square, and the Port Authority Bus Terminal.

Grand Central–42nd Street station

Grand Central–42nd StreetGrand CentralGrand Central – 42nd Street
It also contains a connection to the New York City Subway at Grand Central–42nd Street station. It has "always been more colloquially and affectionately known as Grand Central Station", the name of its immediate precursor that operated from 1900 until 1910 and which also shares its name with the nearby U.S. Post Office station at 450 Lexington Avenue and, colloquially, with the Grand Central–42nd Street station next to the terminal.
It serves trains on the IRT Lexington Avenue Line, the IRT Flushing Line and the 42nd Street Shuttle, and lies next to and beneath Grand Central Terminal, which serves all Metro-North Railroad lines east of the Hudson River.

East Side Access

Arch Street Yardcommuter railEast Side Access
The East Side Access project, which will bring Long Island Rail Road service to a new station beneath the terminal, is expected to be completed in late 2022.
East Side Access is a public works project under construction by the Metropolitan Transportation Authority (MTA) in New York City, which will extend the Long Island Rail Road (LIRR) from its Main Line in Queens into a new station under Grand Central Terminal on Manhattan's East Side.

List of busiest railway stations in North America

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The terminal is the third-busiest train station in North America, after New York Penn Station and Toronto Union Station.
For example, Grand Central Terminal, a major attraction on its own right in New York City, has nearly 500,000 people visiting the station daily either to shop, dine, conduct business, meet family and friends, or admire the station.

Metro-North Railroad

Metro-NorthMetro NorthMetro North Railroad
Grand Central is the southern terminus of the Metro-North Railroad's Harlem, Hudson and New Haven Lines, serving the northern parts of the New York metropolitan area.
Three lines provide passenger service on the east side of the Hudson River to Grand Central Terminal in Manhattan: the Hudson, Harlem, and New Haven Lines.

Putnam County, New York

PutnamPutnam County Putnam County, New York
Through these lines, the terminal serves Metro-North commuters traveling to and from the Bronx in New York City; Westchester, Putnam, and Dutchess counties in New York; and Fairfield and New Haven counties in Connecticut.
Midtown Manhattan is around a one-hour drive, and Grand Central Terminal is approximately 1 hour, 20 minute train ride from the county.

New York (state)

New YorkNew York StateNY
Through these lines, the terminal serves Metro-North commuters traveling to and from the Bronx in New York City; Westchester, Putnam, and Dutchess counties in New York; and Fairfield and New Haven counties in Connecticut.
Many landmarks in New York are well known, including four of the world's ten most-visited tourist attractions in 2013: Times Square, Central Park, Niagara Falls, and Grand Central Terminal.

Hudson Line (Metro-North)

Hudson LineHudsonHudson Division
Grand Central is the southern terminus of the Metro-North Railroad's Harlem, Hudson and New Haven Lines, serving the northern parts of the New York metropolitan area.
It was a key route in connecting Grand Central Terminal in New York to LaSalle Street Station in Chicago.

Pennsylvania Station (New York City)

Penn StationPennsylvania StationNew York Penn Station
The terminal is the third-busiest train station in North America, after New York Penn Station and Toronto Union Station.
The rival New York Central Railroad's line ran down Manhattan from the north under Park Avenue and terminated at Grand Central Depot (later Grand Central Station, now Terminal) at 42nd Street.

Waterbury, Connecticut

WaterburyWaterbury, CTBrass City
The clock was designed by Henry Edward Bedford, cast in Waterbury, Connecticut, and designed by the Self Winding Clock Company and built by the Seth Thomas Clock Company, along with several other clocks in the terminal.
The city is along Interstate 84 (Yankee Expressway) and Route 8 and has a Metro-North railroad station with connections to Grand Central Terminal.

Pershing Square Building

Pershing Square café
It is located on the eastern side of Park Avenue between 41st and 42nd Streets, just south of Grand Central Terminal.

Long Island Rail Road

LIRRLong IslandLong Island Railroad
The East Side Access project, which will bring Long Island Rail Road service to a new station beneath the terminal, is expected to be completed in late 2022.

New York, New Haven and Hartford Railroad

New Haven RailroadNew York, New Haven & Hartford RailroadNew Haven
Grand Central Terminal was built by and named for the New York Central Railroad; it also served the New York, New Haven and Hartford Railroad and, later, successors to the New York Central.
With the opening of Grand Central Terminal in 1913, New Haven's New York City terminal was moved there.

Amtrak

National Railroad Passenger CorporationRail Passenger Service ActAmtrak trains
Grand Central Terminal served intercity trains until 1991, when Amtrak began routing its trains through nearby Penn Station.
In New York City, Amtrak had to pay and maintain both the Penn Station and the Grand Central Terminal due to the lack of track connections to bring trains from upstate New York into Penn Station; a problem that was rectified once the Empire Connection was built in 1991.

New Canaan Branch

New CanaanNew Canaan RailroadNew Canaan Line
While most trains operate as local shuttles between Stamford and New Canaan, several weekday trains operate between New Canaan and Grand Central Terminal running along the New Haven main line.

20th Century Limited

Twentieth Century Limited
Another notable former train was New York Central's 20th Century Limited, a luxury service that operated to Chicago's LaSalle Street Station between 1902 and 1967 and was among the most famous trains of its time.
The train traveled between Grand Central Terminal (GCT) in New York City and LaSalle Street Station in Chicago, Illinois, along the railroad's "Water Level Route".

New Canaan, Connecticut

New CanaanNew Canaan, CTNew Caanan, Connecticut
Many New Canaan residents commute to New York regularly, with travel time to Grand Central Terminal approximately 65 minutes.

New York metropolitan area

New York City metropolitan areaCombined Statistical AreaNew York
Grand Central is the southern terminus of the Metro-North Railroad's Harlem, Hudson and New Haven Lines, serving the northern parts of the New York metropolitan area.
Metro-North Railroad train station, New Hamburg, is located in the Town of Poughkeepsie and runs from Poughkeepsie to Grand Central Station in New York City.

450 Lexington Avenue

It has "always been more colloquially and affectionately known as Grand Central Station", the name of its immediate precursor that operated from 1900 until 1910 and which also shares its name with the nearby U.S. Post Office station at 450 Lexington Avenue and, colloquially, with the Grand Central–42nd Street station next to the terminal.
The tower was built within and on top of the preexisting structure of the Grand Central Post Office, which was designed by Warren and Wetmore and constructed from 1906 to 1909.

Grand Central LIRR terminal

a new stationnew stationtrain terminal
The East Side Access project, which will bring Long Island Rail Road service to a new station beneath the terminal, is expected to be completed in late 2022.
It is located beneath Grand Central Terminal, which serves the MTA's Metro-North Railroad.

Reed and Stem

Reed & StemCharles A. ReedAllen H. Stem
The original plan for Grand Central's interior was designed by Reed and Stem, with some work by Whitney Warren of Warren and Wetmore.
Through Reed's relationship, by marriage, to the president of the New York Central Railroad, they gained a high-profile commission for the construction of New York's Grand Central Terminal with the architecture firm of Warren and Wetmore, and the newly hired Alfred T. Fellheimer as lead architect.

Adirondack (train)

AdirondackThe AdirondackAD
Notable Amtrak services at Grand Central included the Lake Shore, Empire Service, Ethan Allen Express, Adirondack, Niagara Rainbow, Maple Leaf, and Empire State Express.
The Adirondack began running on August 6, 1974 (with a ceremonial train the previous day) from Grand Central Terminal in New York to Albany, then over the D&H's line to Windsor Station in Montreal.