Grand Trunk Pacific Railway

Grand Trunk PacificGrand TrunkGrand Trunk Pacific RailroadGTPGTPRG.T.P.Grand Truck Pacific RailwayMountain Sectionrailway construction scowsthe Grand Trunk Pacific
The Grand Trunk Pacific Railway was an historical Canadian transcontinental railway running from Winnipeg to Prince Rupert, British Columbia, a Pacific coast port.wikipedia
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Prince Rupert, British Columbia

Prince RupertPrince Rupert HarbourPrince Rupert, BC
The Grand Trunk Pacific Railway was an historical Canadian transcontinental railway running from Winnipeg to Prince Rupert, British Columbia, a Pacific coast port.
Prince Rupert replaced Port Simpson as the choice for the Grand Trunk Pacific Railway (GTP) western terminus.

Canadian National Railway

Canadian NationalCanadian National RailwaysCN
Largely constructed 1907–14, the GTPR operated 1914–19, prior to nationalization as the Canadian National Railway (CNR).
Another Canadian railway, the Grand Trunk Pacific Railway (GTPR), encountered financial difficulty on March 7, 1919, when its parent company Grand Trunk Railway (GTR) defaulted on repayment of construction loans to the federal government.

Grand Trunk Railway

Grand Trunk RailroadGrand TrunkGrand Trunk Railway of Canada
The Grand Trunk Railway (GTR) managed and operated the entire line.

National Transcontinental Railway

National TranscontinentalCanadian transcontinental railwayNTR
East of Winnipeg the line continued as the National Transcontinental Railway (NTR], running across northern Ontario and Quebec, crossing the St. Lawrence River at Quebec City and ending at Moncton, New Brunswick.
The GTR board of directors wished to assume the financial risks only for the portion of the system west of Winnipeg and so the agreement resulted in two railway systems being funded by government: the Grand Trunk Pacific Railway, which would run from Winnipeg to Prince Rupert and be built and operated by GTR as a subsidiary, and the government-owned and -built National Transcontinental Railway (NTR) would run from Winnipeg to Moncton and be operated by GTR upon completion.

Edson, Alberta

EdsonGlenwoodGlenwood, Alberta (former hamlet)
For contractual purposes, Winnipeg to Wolf Creek (Edson, Alberta) was the Prairie Section, and Wolf Creek to the Pacific was the Mountain Section.
The town was founded as Heatherwood, but the name was changed around 1911 in honour of Edson Joseph Chamberlin, vice-president of the Grand Trunk Pacific Railway.

Canadian Northern Railway

Canadian NorthernCNoRJames Bay Railway
Seeking a transcontinental to open up the central latitudes, the Government of Canada made overtures to the GTR and Canadian Northern Railway (CNoR).
In 1902, the GTR held talks with Laurier and agreed to build a transcontinental under the auspices of the GTPR for the western portion, with the eastern portion built by the government-owned NTR.

BC Rail

Pacific Great Eastern RailwayBritish Columbia RailwayPacific Great Eastern
The more northerly Pine Pass option, as specified in its charter, may have been a better choice in terms of developing traffic, and in improving the current CNR network (especially if the later Pacific Great Eastern Railway route had opted for the Monkman Pass crossing).
The Pacific Great Eastern Railway (PGE) was incorporated on February 27, 1912, to build a line from Vancouver north to a connection with the Grand Trunk Pacific Railway (GTP) at Prince George.

Foley, Welch and Stewart

Foley, Welch & StewartFoley Bros. Welch and StewartFoley, Welch, and Stewart
Foley, Welch and Stewart (FW&S) was selected as the prime contractor for the latter.
They built miles of track for the Great Northern Railway, Northern Pacific Railroad, Canadian Pacific Railway, Canadian Northern Railway, Grand Trunk Pacific Railway and Pacific Great Eastern Railway.

British Columbia

BCBritish Columbia, CanadaB.C.
Nearer to Asia than Vancouver, Port Simpson was located about 19 mi southeast of the southern entrance to the Portland Canal (which forms part of the boundary between British Columbia and Alaska).
In 1914, the last spike of a second transcontinental rail line, the Grand Trunk Pacific, linking north-central British Columbia from the Yellowhead Pass through Prince George to Prince Rupert was driven at Fort Fraser.

Jasper, Alberta

JasperJasper townsiteMunicipality of Jasper
The GTPR followed the original Sandford Fleming "Canadian Pacific Survey" route from Jasper, Alberta through the Yellowhead Pass, and the track-laying machine crossed the BC/Alberta border in November 1911.
The railway siding at the location of the future townsite was established by Grand Trunk Pacific Railway in 1911 and originally named Fitzhugh after a Grand Trunk vice president (along the Grand Trunk's "alphabet" line).

Last Spike (Grand Trunk Pacific Railway)

last spikelast spike of the Grand Trunk Pacific Railwayconstruction of the Grand Trunk Pacific was completed
The line completed across the prairies, through the Canadian Rockies, and to the newly constructed seaport at Prince Rupert, the last spike ceremony occurred one mile east of Fort Fraser, British Columbia at Stuart (Finmoore) on April 7, 1914.
The Grand Trunk Pacific Railway commenced construction in British Columbia in 1908.

Monkman Pass

via the Monkman Pass
The more northerly Pine Pass option, as specified in its charter, may have been a better choice in terms of developing traffic, and in improving the current CNR network (especially if the later Pacific Great Eastern Railway route had opted for the Monkman Pass crossing).
According to his account, while on a westward trapping and hunting trip in the 1921/22 winter, he realized he had crossed the continental divide through a lower pass, either on locating a spike from the 1904 Grand Trunk survey, or on meeting trappers who had canoed from the Fraser River.

Upper Fraser, British Columbia

Upper FraserWilliam (Bill) Chance (1921–62), later at Upper Fraser
The articles for the Grand Canyon of the Fraser, Dome Creek, McGregor, Upper Fraser, and the BC communities within the, outline construction through those specific localities.
In May 1913, during the Grand Trunk Pacific Railway construction, the Smith and Ramsay camp was just northwest at former Mile 195, and their engineer, F. Purvis, was just southeast at former Mile 193.

Prince George, British Columbia

Prince GeorgeFort GeorgePrince George, BC
During the construction phase from Tête Jaune to Fort George thousands of tons of freight, both for railway construction and merchants, travelled downstream from the railhead by scow.
Finally in 1903, Fort George's fortune began to change when reports said that the Grand Trunk Pacific Railway (later part of Canadian National Railway (CN Rail)) would pass near the fur post.

Skeena (sternwheeler)

SkeenaSkeena'' (sternwheeler)
Detailed articles cover the sternwheelers Skeena, Operator, and Conveyor and their roles on the Skeena River, and on the Fraser River.
The Skeena sternwheeler was one of five sternwheelers built for the use on the Skeena River by Foley, Welch and Stewart for construction work on the Grand Trunk Pacific Railway from 1909 until 1911.

Dome Creek, British Columbia

Dome Creek
The articles for the Grand Canyon of the Fraser, Dome Creek, McGregor, Upper Fraser, and the BC communities within the, outline construction through those specific localities.
Foley, Welch and Stewart (FW&S) was the prime contractor for the Mountain Section.

Pine Pass

Pine or Peace PassesPine Pass highwayPine Pass option
The more northerly Pine Pass option, as specified in its charter, may have been a better choice in terms of developing traffic, and in improving the current CNR network (especially if the later Pacific Great Eastern Railway route had opted for the Monkman Pass crossing).
The Grand Trunk Pacific Railway charter specified the Peace Pass, Pine Pass or such other Rocky Mountains pass which was most convenient and practicable.

Yellowhead Pass

Yellowheadbear his name
The GTPR followed the original Sandford Fleming "Canadian Pacific Survey" route from Jasper, Alberta through the Yellowhead Pass, and the track-laying machine crossed the BC/Alberta border in November 1911.
However, both the Grand Trunk Pacific and Canadian Northern Railways used the Yellowhead Pass for their main lines built c. 1910–1913, and the main line of their successor, the Canadian National Railway, still follows the route.

Conveyor (sternwheeler)

ConveyorConveyor'' (sternwheeler)MV ''Conveyor
Detailed articles cover the sternwheelers Skeena, Operator, and Conveyor and their roles on the Skeena River, and on the Fraser River.
The Conveyor was one of five sternwheelers built for the use on the Skeena River by Foley, Welch and Stewart for construction work on the Grand Trunk Pacific Railway.

Tête Jaune Cache, British Columbia

Tête Jaune CacheTête JauneTete Jaune Cache
Launched in 1909, the Operator and Conveyor were disassembled in 1911, transported to Tête Jaune and relaunched in 1912 on the Fraser River.
During the construction of the Grand Trunk Pacific Railway Tête Jaune Cache was a prosperous community and was the head of navigation for the paddle steamers of Foley, Welch and Stewart and the BC Express Company.

Operator (sternwheeler)

OperatorMV OperatorOperator'' (sternwheeler)
Detailed articles cover the sternwheelers Skeena, Operator, and Conveyor and their roles on the Skeena River, and on the Fraser River.
The Operator sternwheeler was one of five sternwheelers built for the use on the Skeena River by Foley, Welch and Stewart for construction work on the Grand Trunk Pacific Railway.

Charles Melville Hays

Charles HaysCharles M. HaysHays, Charles Melville
In 1910 at Prince Rupert, although 25 real estate agents operated, David Hayes, brother of GTP president Charles Melville Hays was the sole company agent.
Hays is credited with the formation of the Grand Trunk Pacific Railway (GTP), a dream he had to create a second transcontinental railroad within the borders of Canada.

McGregor, British Columbia

McGregorHansard BridgeHansard railway bridge
The articles for the Grand Canyon of the Fraser, Dome Creek, McGregor, Upper Fraser, and the BC communities within the, outline construction through those specific localities.
The Grand Trunk Pacific Railway (later the CNR) Hansard Bridge spans at Mile 99.1, Fraser Subdivision (formerly about Mile 188.5, though a contemporary article inadvertently quoted the camp location).

Fort Fraser, British Columbia

Fort Fraser
The line completed across the prairies, through the Canadian Rockies, and to the newly constructed seaport at Prince Rupert, the last spike ceremony occurred one mile east of Fort Fraser, British Columbia at Stuart (Finmoore) on April 7, 1914.
The present community is located at the site of the last spike of the Grand Trunk Pacific Railway, driven on April 7, 1914.

Hotel Macdonald

Fairmont Hotel MacdonaldThe Macdonald
The GTPR built the Fort Garry Hotel in Winnipeg, and the Hotel Macdonald in Edmonton.
It was built by the Grand Trunk Pacific Railway, and has been successively owned by Canadian National Railway, Canadian Pacific Hotels, and Fairmont Hotels and Resorts.