Grande Armée

French ArmyGrand ArmyGrande Armée d'AllemagneNapoleonic armyFrench troopsGreat ArmyFrenchimperialLa Grande ArméeFrench armies
The Grande Armée (French for Great Army) was the army commanded by Napoleon during the Napoleonic Wars.wikipedia
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Napoleonic Wars

Napoleonicwar with FranceNapoleonic War
The Grande Armée (French for Great Army) was the army commanded by Napoleon during the Napoleonic Wars.
The resulting campaign ended with the dissolution and withdrawal of the French Grande Armée.

Battle of Austerlitz

AusterlitzAusterlitz 1805Bait and Bash
When Napoleon discovered that Russian and Austrian armies were preparing to invade France in late 1805, the Grande Armée was quickly ordered across the Rhine into Southern Germany, leading to Napoleon's victories at Ulm, Austerlitz and Jena.
In what is widely regarded as the greatest victory achieved by Napoleon, the Grande Armée of France defeated a larger Russian and Austrian army led by Emperor Alexander I and Holy Roman Emperor Francis II.

War of the Third Coalition

Third CoalitionThirdWar of the Third Coalition against France
Napoleon later deployed the army east in order to eliminate the threat of Austria and Russia, which were part of the Third Coalition assembled against France. Thereafter, the name was used for the principal French army deployed in the Campaigns of 1805 and 1807, where it got its prestige, and 1809, 1812, and 1813–14.
The war would be determined on the continent, and the major land operations that sealed the swift French victory involved the Ulm Campaign, a large wheeling manoeuvre by the Grande Armée lasting from late August to mid-October 1805 that captured an entire Austrian army, and the decisive French victory over a combined Russo-Austrian force under Tsar Alexander I at the Battle of Austerlitz in early December.

Battle of Eylau

Eylauinvasion of PolandEylau 1807
A difficult winter campaign produced nothing but a stalemate, made worse by the Battle of Eylau on February 7–8, 1807, where Russian and French casualties soared for little gain.
The Battle of Eylau or Battle of Preussisch-Eylau, 7 and 8 February 1807, was a bloody and inconclusive battle between Napoleon's Grande Armée and the Imperial Russian Army under the command of Levin August von Bennigsen near the town of Preussisch Eylau in East Prussia.

III Corps (Grande Armée)

III CorpsFrench III CorpsIII
Davout's III Corps, the victors at Auerstadt, received the honours of first marching into Berlin.
The III Corps of the Grande Armée was the designation of a few military units during the Napoleonic Wars.

Ulm Campaign

Ulm1805 campaignagainst the Austrians
The Ulm Campaign, as it came to be known, resulted in 60,000 Austrian captives at the cost of just 2,000 French soldiers.
The French Grande Armée, led by Napoleon Bonaparte, comprised 210,000 troops organized into seven corps, and hoped to knock out the Austrian army in the Danube before Russian reinforcements could arrive.

Karl Mack von Leiberich

MackGeneral MackKarl Mack
They left the Boulogne camps late in August and through a rapid march surrounded General Karl Mack's isolated Austrian army at the fortress of Ulm.
He is best remembered as the commander of the Austrian forces that capitulated to Napoleon's Grande Armée in the Battle of Ulm in 1805.

Battle of Bailén

BailénBaylenBailén (Battle of)
The French attempted to occupy Spain in 1808, but a series of disasters prompted Napoleon to intervene personally later in the year.
The Battle of Bailén was fought in 1808 by the Spanish Army of Andalusia, led by Generals Francisco Castaños and Theodor von Reding, and the Imperial French Army's II corps d'observation de la Gironde under General Pierre Dupont de l'Étang.

Campaign in north-east France (1814)

campaign in north-east FranceCampaign of France1814 Campaign in France
Napoleon led a new army to the Battle of the Nations at Leipzig in 1813, in the defence of France in 1814 and in the Waterloo Campaign in 1815, but the Napoleonic French army would never regain the heights of the Grande Armée of June 1812.
When this campaign resulted in the destruction of Napoleon's Grande Armée, Prussia and Austria took advantage of this situation by forming a Sixth Coalition against France.

Battle of Leipzig

LeipzigBattle of the NationsBattle of the Nations at Leipzig
Napoleon led a new army to the Battle of the Nations at Leipzig in 1813, in the defence of France in 1814 and in the Waterloo Campaign in 1815, but the Napoleonic French army would never regain the heights of the Grande Armée of June 1812.
The French Emperor Napoleon I attempted to militarily coerce Tsar Alexander I of Russia into rejoining his unpopular Continental System by invading Russia with about 650,000 troops, collectively known as the Grande Armée, and eventually occupied Moscow in late 1812, after the bloody yet indecisive Battle of Borodino.

Battle of Somosierra

SomosierraSomosierra (Battle of)Battle of the Sommosierra Pass
The 125,000-strong Grande Armée marched forward, capturing the fortress of Burgos, clearing the way to Madrid at the Battle of Somosierra, and forcing the Spanish armies to retreat.
The Battle of Somosierra took place on November 30, 1808, during the Peninsular War, when a French army under Napoleon I forced a passage through the Sierra de Guadarrama shielding Madrid.

Russian Empire

RussiaRussianImperial Russia
Napoleon later deployed the army east in order to eliminate the threat of Austria and Russia, which were part of the Third Coalition assembled against France.
Although Napoleon's Grande Armée made its way to Moscow, the Russians' scorched earth strategy prevented the invaders from living off the country.

Peninsular War

PeninsulaWar of IndependenceSpain
This campaign formed the basis for the Peninsular War, which was to last six years and drain the First Empire of vital resources and manpower.
The years of fighting in Spain were a heavy burden on France's Grande Armée.

Battle of Ulm

UlmSiege of UlmUlm Maneuver
When Napoleon discovered that Russian and Austrian armies were preparing to invade France in late 1805, the Grande Armée was quickly ordered across the Rhine into Southern Germany, leading to Napoleon's victories at Ulm, Austerlitz and Jena.
Napoleon had 177,000 troops of the Grande Armée at Boulogne, ready to invade England.

First French Empire

French EmpireFranceFrench
This campaign formed the basis for the Peninsular War, which was to last six years and drain the First Empire of vital resources and manpower. From 1805 to 1809, the Grande Armée scored a series of historic victories that gave the French Empire an unprecedented grip on power over the European continent.
Though the vague plan for an invasion of Great Britain was never executed, the Battle of Ulm and the Battle of Austerlitz overshadowed the defeat of Trafalgar, and the camp at Boulogne put at Napoleon's disposal the best military resources he had commanded, in the form of La Grande Armée.

Treaties of Tilsit

Treaty of Tilsitpeace of TilsitTilsit
This victory produced the Treaty of Tilsit between France and Russia in July, leaving Napoleon with no enemies on the continent.
The treaties were made at the expense of the Prussian king, who had already agreed to a truce on 25 June after the Grande Armée had pursued him to the easternmost frontier of his realm.

War of the Fifth Coalition

Fifth Coalition1809 campaignFifth
Thereafter, the name was used for the principal French army deployed in the Campaigns of 1805 and 1807, where it got its prestige, and 1809, 1812, and 1813–14.
In August 1805, the French Grande Armée invaded the German states in hopes of knocking Austria out of the war before Russian forces could intervene.

Battle of Wagram

WagramWagram 1809victory at Wagram
A second attempt to cross the river proved more successful in July and set the stage for the two-day Battle of Wagram, where the French emerged victorious, inflicting some 40,000 casualties on the Austrians, but themselves suffering 37,000.
Command of the French and allied army, styled Grande Armée d'Allemagne, was in the hands of Maréchal Berthier, a formidable officer when working as Napoleon's chief of staff, but completely out of his depth as a commander by proxy.

Battle of Corunna

Corunnaretreat to CorunnaCorunna Campaign
They then engaged Moore's British army, prompting the British to withdraw from the Iberian Peninsula after a heroic action at the Battle of Corunna on January 16, 1809.
While the allies inched forward, a vast consolidation of bodies and bayonets from the far reaches of the French Empire brought 100,000 veterans of the Grande Armée into Spain, led in person by Napoleon and his Marshals.

Smolensk

historySmoleńskSmolensk Kremlin
After the capture of Smolensk and victory in the Battle of Borodino, Napoleon and a part of the Grande Armée reached Moscow on 14 September 1812.
In August 1812, two of the largest armies ever assembled clashed in Smolensk.

Jean Baptiste Eblé

EblégénéralJean-Baptiste, baron Eblé
The resulting Battle of Berezina and the monumental work of Eblé's engineers saved the remnants of the Armée.
He is credited with saving Napoleon's Grand Army from complete destruction in 1812.

Imperial Guard (Napoleon I)

Imperial GuardYoung GuardGuard
In 1806, when these posts were created, they were members of the Imperial Guard; in 1809, while retaining their military status, they were taken under control of the Grand Écuyer in the Emperor's Civil Household.
The Imperial Guard (French: Garde Impériale) was originally a small group of elite soldiers of the French Army under the direct command of Napoleon I, but grew considerably over time.

Boulogne-sur-Mer

BoulogneBononiaBoulogne, France
The Grande Armée was originally formed as L'Armée des côtes de l'Océan (Army of the Ocean Coasts) intended for the invasion of England, at the port of Boulogne in 1803.
During the Napoleonic Wars, Napoleon amassed La Grande Armée in Boulogne to invade the United Kingdom in 1805.

Michel Ney

Marshal NeyNeyMarshall Ney
The French were harassed repeatedly by the converging Russian armies, Ney even conducting a famous rearguard separation between his troops and the Russians, and by the time the Berezina was reached Napoleon only had about 49,000 troops and 40,000 stragglers of little military value.
In the 1805 campaign, Ney took command of VI Corps of the Grande Armée and was praised for his conduct at Elchingen.

War of the Fourth Coalition

Fourth CoalitionFourthPrussian campaign
Thereafter, the name was used for the principal French army deployed in the Campaigns of 1805 and 1807, where it got its prestige, and 1809, 1812, and 1813–14.
Napoleon could scarcely believe Prussia would be so foolish to take him on in a straight fight with hardly any allies at hand on its side, especially since most of his Grande Armée was still in the heart of Germany close to the Prussian border.