Great Britain

BritishBritainGBRGBEnglishEnglandUKGreat-BritainBritish mainlandBriton
Great Britain is an island in the North Atlantic Ocean off the northwest coast of continental Europe.wikipedia
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List of European islands by area

Sarvisalo13th-largest island in Europe51st largest island
With an area of 209,331 km2, it is the largest of the British Isles, the largest European island, and the ninth-largest island in the world.

British Isles

BritainBritishThe British Isles
With an area of 209,331 km2, it is the largest of the British Isles, the largest European island, and the ninth-largest island in the world.
The British Isles are a group of islands in the North Atlantic off the north-western coast of continental Europe that consist of the islands of Great Britain, Ireland, the Isle of Man, the Hebrides and over six thousand smaller isles.

Ireland

IrishIRLisland of Ireland
The island of Ireland is situated to the west of Great Britain, and together these islands, along with over 1,000 smaller surrounding islands, form the British Isles archipelago.
It is separated from Great Britain to its east by the North Channel, the Irish Sea, and St George's Channel.

List of islands by population

most populous island2nd most populous islandBy population
In 2011, Great Britain had a population of about 61 million people, making it the world's third-most populous island after Java in Indonesia and Honshu in Japan.

United Kingdom

BritishUKBritain
Politically, Great Britain and Northern Ireland together, constitute the United Kingdom.
The United Kingdom includes the island of Great Britain, the northeastern part of the island of Ireland, and many smaller islands.

List of islands of the British Isles

List of the British Isles1,000 smaller surrounding islands136 permanently inhabited islands
The island of Ireland is situated to the west of Great Britain, and together these islands, along with over 1,000 smaller surrounding islands, form the British Isles archipelago.
Great Britain accounts for the larger part of this area at 66%, with Ireland accounting for 26%, leaving the remaining 8%—an area of 23,996 km 2 —comprising thousands of smaller islands.

England

🏴󠁧󠁢󠁥󠁮󠁧󠁿󠁧󠁢󠁥󠁮󠁧󠁿EnglishENG
Most of England, Scotland, and Wales are on the island.
The country covers five-eighths of the island of Great Britain, which lies in the North Atlantic, and includes over 100 smaller islands, such as the Isles of Scilly and the Isle of Wight.

Scotland

Scottish🏴󠁧󠁢󠁳󠁣󠁴󠁿Scots
Most of England, Scotland, and Wales are on the island.
It covers the northern third of the island of Great Britain, with a border with England to the southeast, and is surrounded by the Atlantic Ocean to the north and west, the North Sea to the northeast, the Irish Sea to the south, and more than 790 islands, including the Northern Isles and the Hebrides.

Kingdom of Scotland

ScotlandScottishScots
A single Kingdom of Great Britain resulted from the union of the Kingdom of England (which had already comprised the present-day countries of England and Wales) and the Kingdom of Scotland by the 1707 Acts of Union.
Its territories expanded and shrank, but it came to occupy the northern third of the island of Great Britain, sharing a land border to the south with the Kingdom of England.

Kingdom of England

EnglandEnglishAnglo
A single Kingdom of Great Britain resulted from the union of the Kingdom of England (which had already comprised the present-day countries of England and Wales) and the Kingdom of Scotland by the 1707 Acts of Union.
The Kingdom of England (Anglo-Norman: Realme d'Engleterre, Royaume d'Angleterre ) was a sovereign state on the island of Great Britain from 927, when it emerged from various Anglo-Saxon kingdoms until 1707, when it united with Scotland to form the Kingdom of Great Britain.

List of islands by area

world's largest islandlargest island in the worldlargest islands in the world
With an area of 209,331 km2, it is the largest of the British Isles, the largest European island, and the ninth-largest island in the world.

Roman Britain

RomanBritainBritannia
However, with the Roman conquest of Britain the Latin term Britannia was used for the island of Great Britain, and later Roman-occupied Britain south of Caledonia.
Roman Britain (Britannia or, later, Britanniae, "the Britains") was the area of the island of Great Britain that was governed by the Roman Empire, from 43 to 410 AD.

Kingdom of Great Britain

Great BritainBritishBritain
A single Kingdom of Great Britain resulted from the union of the Kingdom of England (which had already comprised the present-day countries of England and Wales) and the Kingdom of Scotland by the 1707 Acts of Union.
The state came into being following the Treaty of Union in 1706, ratified by the Acts of Union 1707, which united the kingdoms of England (which included Wales) and Scotland to form a single kingdom encompassing the whole island of Great Britain and its outlying islands, with the exception of the Isle of Man and the Channel Islands.

Albion

AlbaAlbinaAlbinus
The earliest known name for Great Britain is Albion or insula Albionum, from either the Latin albus meaning "white" (possibly referring to the white cliffs of Dover, the first view of Britain from the continent) or the "island of the Albiones". 150 AD), he gave the islands the names Alwion, Iwernia, and Mona (the Isle of Man), suggesting these may have been the names of the individual islands not known to him at the time of writing Almagest.
Albion is an alternative name for the island of Great Britain.

Wales

🏴󠁧󠁢󠁷󠁬󠁳󠁿WelshWAL
Most of England, Scotland, and Wales are on the island.
Historically in Britain, the words were not restricted to modern Wales or to the Welsh but were used to refer to anything that the Anglo-Saxons associated with the Britons, including other non-Germanic territories in Britain (e.g. Cornwall) and places in Anglo-Saxon territory associated with Britons (e.g. Walworth in County Durham and Walton in West Yorkshire).

Old English

Anglo-SaxonSaxonAnglo Saxon
The French form replaced the Old English Breoton, Breoten, Bryten, Breten (also Breoton-lond, Breten-lond).
It was brought to Great Britain by Anglo-Saxon settlers probably in the mid-5th century, and the first Old English literary works date from the mid-7th century.

Roman conquest of Britain

Roman invasion of BritainRoman conquestRoman invasion
However, with the Roman conquest of Britain the Latin term Britannia was used for the island of Great Britain, and later Roman-occupied Britain south of Caledonia.
Great Britain had already frequently been the target of invasions, planned and actual, by forces of the Roman Republic and Roman Empire.

Pytheas

Pytheas of MassaliaPytheas of MassiliaPythéas
Greek historians Diodorus of Sicily and Strabo preserved variants of Prettanike from the work of Greek explorer Pytheas of Massalia, who travelled from his home in Hellenistic southern Gaul to Britain in the 4th century BC.
On this voyage, he circumnavigated and visited a considerable part of modern-day Great Britain and Ireland.

Isle of Man

ManxMannIsle of Mann
150 AD), he gave the islands the names Alwion, Iwernia, and Mona (the Isle of Man), suggesting these may have been the names of the individual islands not known to him at the time of writing Almagest.
The Isle of Man (Mannin, also Ellan Vannin ), sometimes referred to simply as Mann, is a self-governing British Crown dependency in the Irish Sea between Great Britain and Ireland.

Oceanic climate

Cfbmarine west coastmaritime influence
The island is dominated by a maritime climate with narrow temperature differences between seasons.
Oceanic climates in Europe occur mostly in Northwest Europe, from Ireland and Great Britain eastward to central Europe.

Brittany

BretonBritannyBretagne
Geoffrey of Monmouth in his pseudohistorical Historia Regum Britanniae (c. 1136) refers to the island as Britannia major ("Greater Britain"), to distinguish it from Britannia minor ("Lesser Britain"), the continental region which approximates to modern Brittany, which had been settled in the fifth and sixth centuries by migrants from Britain.
Brittany has also been referred to as Less, Lesser or Little Britain (as opposed to Great Britain, with which it shares an etymology).

James IV of Scotland

James IVKing James IVKing James IV of Scotland
The term Great Britain was first used officially in 1474, in the instrument drawing up the proposal for a marriage between Cecily the daughter of Edward IV of England, and James the son of James III of Scotland, which described it as "this Nobill Isle, callit Gret Britanee".
He was the last monarch from the island of Great Britain to be killed in battle.

Brittonic languages

BrythonicBrittonicBrythonic languages
Priteni is the source of the Welsh language term Prydain, Britain, which has the same source as the Goidelic term Cruithne used to refer to the early Brythonic-speaking inhabitants of Ireland.
The Brittonic languages derive from the Common Brittonic language, spoken throughout Great Britain south of the Firth of Forth during the Iron Age and Roman period.

Welsh language

WelshWelsh-languageWelsh-speaking
Priteni is the source of the Welsh language term Prydain, Britain, which has the same source as the Goidelic term Cruithne used to refer to the early Brythonic-speaking inhabitants of Ireland.
Classified as Insular Celtic, the British language probably arrived in Britain during the Bronze Age or Iron Age and was probably spoken throughout the island south of the Firth of Forth.

Prydain

Island of the MightyPrydeinBritain
Priteni is the source of the Welsh language term Prydain, Britain, which has the same source as the Goidelic term Cruithne used to refer to the early Brythonic-speaking inhabitants of Ireland.
Prydain (Middle Welsh: Prydein) is the modern Welsh name for Great Britain.