Great Northern Railway (Great Britain)

Great Northern RailwayGNRGreat NorthernGreat Northern Railway CompanyLondon and York RailwayGreat Northern RailwaysGreat Northern Railway (GNR)GNHalifax and Ovenden Joint Railway Great Northern Railway
The Great Northern Railway (GNR) was a British railway company incorporated in 1846 with the object of building a line from London to York.wikipedia
1,056 Related Articles

East Coast Main Line

East CoastECMLEast
Anglo-Scottish travel on the East Coast Main Line became commercially important; the GNR controlled the line from London to Doncaster and allied itself with the North Eastern Railway and the North British Railway so as to offer seamless travel facilities.
The line was built during the 1840s by three railway companies, the North British Railway, the North Eastern Railway, and the Great Northern Railway.

Nigel Gresley

GresleySir Nigel GresleyGresley’s
Its fast passenger express trains captured the public imagination, and its Chief Mechanical Engineer Nigel Gresley became a celebrity.
A year later, he moved to the Great Northern Railway (GNR) as Carriage and Wagon Superintendent.

London and North Eastern Railway

LNERLondon & North Eastern RailwayL&NER
The Great Northern Railway was a constituent of the London and North Eastern Railway, which took control at the beginning of 1923.
The LNER inherited four of London's termini: (ex-London and Blackwall Railway; King's Cross (ex-Great Northern Railway); (ex-Great Eastern Railway); and (ex-Great Central Railway).

Manchester, Sheffield and Lincolnshire Railway

Manchester, Sheffield & Lincolnshire RailwayMS&LRMSLR
Five trains ran each way every weekday, and on from Grimsby to New Holland on the River Humber, by alliance with the Manchester, Sheffield and Lincolnshire Railway.
It pursued a policy of expanding its area of influence, especially in reaching west to Liverpool, which it ultimately did through the medium of the Cheshire Lines Committee network in joint partnership with the Great Northern Railway and the Midland Railway.

Doncaster

Doncaster, South YorkshireDoncaster, EnglandDoncaster MB
Anglo-Scottish travel on the East Coast Main Line became commercially important; the GNR controlled the line from London to Doncaster and allied itself with the North Eastern Railway and the North British Railway so as to offer seamless travel facilities.
During the Industrial Revolution the railway came to Doncaster, and the Great Northern Railway established the Doncaster Locomotive and Carriage Building Works.

South Yorkshire Railway

South Yorkshire, Doncaster and Goole RailwaySouth Yorkshire, Doncaster & Goole Railway CompanyBlackburn Valley line
It also took about a third of a million pounds worth of shares in the South Yorkshire Railway.
Work ran overtime but the line was ready for a trial run to take place on 29 October 1849 when a special train left Doncaster, Cherry Tree Lane station located on the triangle junction with the Great Northern Railway (GNR), southwest of Doncaster.

Bradford, Wakefield and Leeds Railway

West Yorkshire Railway
Another independent railway, the Bradford, Wakefield and Leeds Railway opened its line between Wakefield (the present-day Kirkgate station) and junctions near Leeds, on 3 October 1857.
It opened its main line in 1857, and was worked by the Great Northern Railway.

Grantham

Grantham, LincolnshireGrantham, EnglandMayor of Grantham
The Ambergate, Nottingham, Boston and Eastern Junction Railway had been formed to connect the manufacturing districts of Manchester with the port of Boston, and had opened in 1850 between Colwick Junction, near Nottingham, and a temporary station at Grantham.
The Nottingham Line (LNER) arrived first in 1850, then the London line (GNR) – the Towns Line from Peterborough to Retford – arrived in 1852.

George Hudson

collapsed around this timeKing' Hudson
At this time George Hudson, a railway financier, was exceptionally skilled in promoting railways and having them built, and most particularly of neutralising or destroying any opposition or competition to his lines.
Edmund Denison MP was keen to promote a faster link from London to York via Doncaster and formed the London and York Railway issuing a prospectus in May 1844.

Leeds, Bradford and Halifax Junction Railway

Ardsley to Laisterdyke lineGreat Northern Railway lineLeeds, Bradford & Halifax Junction Railway
On 1 August 1854, the independent Leeds, Bradford and Halifax Junction Railway opened its line between Leeds and Bowling Junction, close to Bradford, where it made a connection with the L&YR.
It was worked by the Great Northern Railway, giving that company the access it needed to Bradford and Halifax, and the GNR absorbed the LB&HJR in 1865.

Doncaster Works

DoncasterDoncaster railway worksDoncaster Locomotive Works
Reflecting the anticipated focus of operations, the GNR opened a new locomotive works at Doncaster in 1853, replacing earlier facilities at Boston.
Always referred to as "the Plant", it was established by the Great Northern Railway in 1853, replacing the previous works in Boston and Peterborough.

North Eastern Railway (United Kingdom)

North Eastern RailwayNERNorth Eastern Railway (UK)
Anglo-Scottish travel on the East Coast Main Line became commercially important; the GNR controlled the line from London to Doncaster and allied itself with the North Eastern Railway and the North British Railway so as to offer seamless travel facilities.
The NER's main line formed the middle link on the Anglo-Scottish "East Coast Main Line" between London and Edinburgh, joining the Great Northern Railway near Doncaster and the North British Railway at Berwick-upon-Tweed.

Firsby

Firsby Junction
This was followed by the opening from Louth to Firsby on 3 September 1848.
Initial traffic levels and income were promising, however by 1885 rail traffic had slumped leading to the Great Northern Railway buying out the Spilsby & Firsby Railway Company for £20,000 through an Act of Parliament on 25 July 1890.

Midland Railway

MidlandMidland Railway CompanyMR
Part of the Loop Line was soon ready, and 58 miles from Walton Junction (near Peterborough, on the newly opened Midland Railway) to Lincoln opened on 17 October 1848.
In spite of the objections of Hudson, for the MR and others, the "London and York Railway" (later the Great Northern Railway) led by Edmund Denison persisted, and the bill passed through Parliament in 1846.

Railway Mania

railway bubbleThe boom in rail transport in Britain1840s railway bubble
This was the period of the Railway Mania, when a myriad of schemes, not all of them realistic, were promoted, and anyone could get rich quickly if they were not caught with a failed scheme.
Amongst the high number of impractical, overambitious and downright fraudulent schemes promoted during the Mania were a good number of practical trunk routes (most notably the initial part of the Great Northern Railway and the trans-Pennine Woodhead route) and important freight lines (such as large parts of what would become the North Eastern Railway).

Peterborough

City of PeterboroughPeterborough, CambridgeshirePeterborough, England
The Midland and Great Northern Joint Railway comprised a main line ran from Peterborough to Great Yarmouth via South Lynn (with running powers to King's Lynn) and Melton Constable.
Railway lines began operating locally during the 1840s, but it was the 1850 opening of the Great Northern Railway's line from London to York that transformed Peterborough from a market town to an industrial centre.

Flying Scotsman (train)

Flying ScotsmanThe Flying Scotsmanfast and regular
By the 1870s they were known as the Flying Scotsman.
The East Coast Main Line over which the Flying Scotsman runs was built in the 19th century by many small railway companies, but mergers and acquisitions led to only three companies controlling the route; the North British Railway (NBR), the North Eastern Railway (NER) and the Great Northern Railway (GNR).

Sir Edmund Beckett, 4th Baronet

Edmund DenisonEdmund BeckettEdmund Beckett Denison
In 1852 the shareholders expressed their displeasure at the volume of financial commitments implied by these, but the Chairman Edmund Denison continued his policy, without showing his hand.
Beckett became chairman of the Great Northern Railway (GNR), which proposed a direct line from London to York via Peterborough and Doncaster, with a loop to serve Lincolnshire.

Great Eastern Railway

GERGreat EasternGreat Eastern Line
In addition, the Norfolk and Suffolk Joint Railway was a joint line owned by the M&GNR and the Great Eastern Railway.
The GER and Great Northern Railway each submitted bills for a line from March to Spalding and although the GNR was successful the GER was awarded running rights over the new line which would later become part of the Great Northern and Great Eastern Joint Railway.

Boston, Sleaford and Midland Counties Railway

The Boston, Sleaford and Midland Counties Railway opened from near Grantham to Sleaford in June 1857, and on to Boston in April 1859.
In fact the company found it impossible to raise the huge capital needed for such a scheme, and it settled for a line between Colwick (a few miles east of Nottingham) and Grantham, where it connected with the Great Northern Railway.

Edgware, Highgate and London Railway

Muswell Hill RailwayEdgware and Highgate railway lineEdgware, High Barnet and Alexandra Palace
The Edgware, Highgate and London Railway was authorised independently in 1862 to build a suburban line from Seven Sisters Road (renamed Finsbury Park in 1869) to Highgate and Edgware.
The railway was sponsored by the larger Great Northern Railway (GNR), whose main line from King's Cross ran through Finsbury Park on its way to Potters Bar and the north.

Patrick Stirling

PatrickStirlingfather
The GNR was most profitable in 1873, running a more intensive service of express trains than either the LNWR or the MR. Hauled by Patrick Stirling's single-driving-wheel locomotives, its trains were some of the fastest in the world.
Patrick Stirling (29 June 1820 – 11 November 1895) was a Scottish railway engineer, and Locomotive Superintendent of the Great Northern Railway of England.

Eastern Counties Railway

Eastern CountiesECREastern Counties Railway Company
The Eastern Counties Railway opened a line from a junction near Cambridge to Shepreth in 1852, and the line from Hitchin to Cambridge was worked on a lease basis as a single entity.
The company's property had been taken over by the receiver in June 1850 and the EAR was leased to the Great Northern Railway (GNR).

Leen Valley lines of the Great Northern Railway

Leen Valley
The Leen Valley line was opened from Bulwell to Annesley in 1881, soon conveying extraordinary volumes of coal.
The Midland Railway had long been dominant in the area, but there was resentment against its monopolistic policies from coalowners, who encouraged the Great Northern Railway to build a line.

Stafford and Uttoxeter Railway

Stafford to UttoxeterStafford to Uttoxeter line
Not far from Egginton, near the western extremity of the line, was the Stafford and Uttoxeter Railway.
It was purchased for £100,000 by the Great Northern Railway in July 1881 as a means of reaching Wales.