Great cardiac vein

great cardiac
The great cardiac vein (left coronary vein) begins at the apex of the heart and ascends along the anterior longitudinal sulcus to the base of the ventricles.wikipedia
25 Related Articles

Heart

cardiachuman heartapex of the heart
The great cardiac vein (left coronary vein) begins at the apex of the heart and ascends along the anterior longitudinal sulcus to the base of the ventricles.
It receives blood from the great cardiac vein (receiving the left atrium and both ventricles), the posterior cardiac vein (draining the back of the left ventricle), the middle cardiac vein (draining the bottom of the left and right ventricles), and small cardiac veins.

Coronary sinus

cardiac vein
It merges with the oblique vein of the left atrium to form the coronary sinus, which drains into the right atrium.
Its wall is partly muscular, and at its junction with the great cardiac vein is somewhat constricted and furnished with a valve, known as the valve of Vieussens consisting of two unequal segments.

Anterior interventricular sulcus

anterior longitudinal sulcusanterior
The great cardiac vein (left coronary vein) begins at the apex of the heart and ascends along the anterior longitudinal sulcus to the base of the ventricles.
The anterior interventricular branch of the left coronary artery runs in the sulcus along with the great cardiac vein.

Left marginal vein

It receives tributaries from the left atrium and from both ventricles: one, the left marginal vein, is of considerable size, and ascends along the left margin of the heart.
The great cardiac vein receives tributaries from the left atrium and from both ventricles: one, the left marginal vein, is of considerable size, and ascends along the left margin of the heart.

Vieussens valve of the coronary sinus

valve of Vieussens
This is the Vieussens valve of the coronary sinus.
The Vieussens valve of the coronary sinus is a valve and anatomic landmark between the coronary sinus and the great cardiac vein.

Ventricle (heart)

ventricleleft ventricleright ventricle
The great cardiac vein (left coronary vein) begins at the apex of the heart and ascends along the anterior longitudinal sulcus to the base of the ventricles.

Oblique vein of the left atrium

Oblique vein of left atriumoblique cardiac veinoblique vein
It merges with the oblique vein of the left atrium to form the coronary sinus, which drains into the right atrium.

Atrium (heart)

right atriumatrialeft atrium
It merges with the oblique vein of the left atrium to form the coronary sinus, which drains into the right atrium. It receives tributaries from the left atrium and from both ventricles: one, the left marginal vein, is of considerable size, and ascends along the left margin of the heart.

Cardiology

cardiologistcardiologistscardiovascular medicine
These include the great cardiac vein, the middle cardiac vein, the small cardiac vein and the anterior cardiac veins.

Vein

veinsvenousvenous system
These include the great cardiac vein, the middle cardiac vein, the small cardiac vein, the smallest cardiac veins, and the anterior cardiac veins.

Posterior vein of the left ventricle

left posterior ventricular veinPosterior vein of left ventricle
The posterior vein of the left ventricle runs on the diaphragmatic surface of the left ventricle to the coronary sinus, but may end in the great cardiac vein.

Coronary circulation

coronary arteriescoronarycoronary artery
These include the great cardiac vein, the middle cardiac vein, the small cardiac vein, the smallest cardiac veins, and the anterior cardiac veins.

Collateralization

collateral blood vesselscollateralized
Among several Japanese studies utilizing the ergovine-provocative spasm test to simulate ischemia in man and beast, including those of Takeshita and Tada, one by Yamagishi found that spasm in the LAD resulted in (1) ST segment elevation more commonly in those without collaterals than in those with them (8 of 9 vs. 2 of 7; p=0.05); (2) greater increases in pulmonary artery end diastolic pressure in those without collaterals (p=0.05); and (3) great cardiac vein flow that was significantly greater in those with collaterals than in those without them.