Great house

Big Housegrand housesgreat housesprivate residenceStately residencea house on such a scaleBig Housescountry houseestate housegrand
A great house is a large house or mansion with luxurious appointments and great retinues of indoor and outdoor staff.wikipedia
173 Related Articles

Manor house

manorhousemanorfortified manor house
In England, while most villages would have a manor house since time immemorial, originally home of the lord of the manor and sometimes referred to as "the big house", not all would have anything as lavish as a traditional English country house, one of the traditional markers of an established "county" family that derived at least a part of its income from landed property.
The Tudor period (16th century) of stability in England saw the building of the first of the unfortified great houses, for example Sutton Place in Surrey, circa 1521.

Millionaires' Mile

Millionaire's RowMillionaires' RowMillionaire Row
In the United States, great houses can be found on streets known informally as "millionaires' mile" (or "row") in certain cities.
Millionaires' Miles are characterized by the presence of great houses in varying architectural styles.

Butler

stewarddispenserUnder Butler
In great houses, the household is sometimes divided into departments with the butler in charge of the dining room, wine cellar, and pantry.

Valet

gentleman's gentlemanvaletsmanservant
* Valet (Gentleman's gentleman)
In a great house, the master of the house had his own valet, and in the very grandest great houses, other adult members of the employing family (e.g. master's sons) would also have their own valets.

Housekeeper (domestic worker)

housekeeperhousekeepersHousekeeping
In the great houses of the eighteenth, nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, the housekeeper could be a woman of considerable power in the domestic arena.

Cook (domestic worker)

cookcookskitchen boy
The term can refer to the head of kitchen staff in a great house or to the cook-housekeeper, a far less prestigious position involving more physical labour.

Governess

governessesgouvernanteat home
Governesses are rarer now, except within large and wealthy households or royal families such as the Saudi royal family and in remote regions such as outback Australia.

Hall boy

hallboy
The hall boy or hallboy was a position held by a young male domestic worker on the staff of a great house, usually a young teenager.

Scullery maid

scullionsculleryscrubber
In great houses, scullery maids were the lowest-ranked and often the youngest of the female domestic servants and acted as assistant to a kitchen maid.

Maid

housemaidchambermaidhousekeeper
Maids were once part of an elaborate hierarchy in great houses, where the retinue of servants stretched up to the housekeeper and butler, responsible for female and male employees respectively.

Between maid

Tweenybetween staffbetween-maid
A between maid (nickname tweeny, also called hall girl particularly in the United States) was a female junior domestic worker in a large household with many staff.

Footman

footmenfoot-boyfootman or footboy
Once a commonly employed servant in great houses, footmen became much rarer after World War I as fewer households could by then afford retinues of servants and retainers.

Retinue

retainersretainerretinues
A great house is a large house or mansion with luxurious appointments and great retinues of indoor and outdoor staff.

Page (servant)

pagepagespage boy
Upon reaching seven years of age, a boy would be sent to the castle, great house or other estate of another noble family.

Kitchen maid (domestic worker)

kitchen maiddomestic kitchen maid
In the hierarchy of a great house, the kitchen maid ranked below a cook and above a scullery maid.

English country house

country housestately homecountry houses
In England, while most villages would have a manor house since time immemorial, originally home of the lord of the manor and sometimes referred to as "the big house", not all would have anything as lavish as a traditional English country house, one of the traditional markers of an established "county" family that derived at least a part of its income from landed property.

Gardener

green thumbgardeninggardener's cottage
A gardener is any person involved in gardening, arguably the oldest occupation, from the hobbyist in a residential garden, the home-owner supplementing the family food with a small vegetable garden or orchard, to an employee in a plant nursery or the head gardener in a large estate.person

Townhouse (Great Britain)

townhousetown housetownhouses
Many mansions were demolished in the 20th century; families that had previously split their time between their country house and their town house found the maintenance of both too expensive.

Still room maid

The still-room maid is a female servant who works in the still room, the functional room in a great house in which drinks and jams are made.

Nursemaid

nursery maidnursenanny
The title 'Nursery Maid' refers to a specific role within the hierarchy of a great house.

Groom (profession)

groomgroomsstable boy
Grooms may be employed in private residences or in professional horse training facilities such as stables, agistment properties and riding academies.

Stable Master

stablemaster
In a private residence the stable master has these responsibilities and must also accommodate the riding schedules of the employer’s family and, if necessary, arrange for lessons and training.

The Edwardian Country House

Manor House
Most of the "upstairs" participants enjoy their time in the house, which is meant to represent the years 1905–1914.

Victorian era

VictorianVictorian-eraVictorian period
The term is used mainly historically, especially of properties at the turn of the 20th century, i.e., the late Victorian or Edwardian era in the United Kingdom and the Gilded Age in the United States.