Great saphenous vein

saphenous veinsaphenous veinsgreater saphenous veinsaphenous vein graftfree vein graftgreat/longGSVlong saphenous veinsapheno-femoral junctionsaphenous
The great saphenous vein (GSV, alternately "long saphenous vein"; ) is a large, subcutaneous, superficial vein of the leg.wikipedia
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Dorsal venous arch of the foot

dorsal venous archArcus venosus dorsalis pedis
The great saphenous vein originates from where the dorsal vein of the big toe (the hallux) merges with the dorsal venous arch of the foot.
The dorsal venous arch of the foot is a superficial vein that connects the small saphenous vein and the great saphenous vein.

Small saphenous vein

short saphenous veinSmall saphenouslesser/short
At the ankle, the great saphenous vein receives branches from the sole of the foot through the medial marginal vein; in the lower leg it anastomoses freely with the small saphenous vein, communicates by perforator veins (Cockett perforators) with the anterior and posterior tibial veins and receives many cutaneous veins; near the knee it communicates with the popliteal vein by the Boyd perforator, in the thigh it communicates with the femoral vein by perforator veins (Dodd perforator) and receives numerous tributaries; those from the medial and posterior parts of the thigh frequently unite to form a large accessory saphenous vein which joins the main vein near the sapheno-femoral junction.
The origin of the small saphenous vein, (SSV) is where the dorsal vein from the fifth digit (smallest toe) merges with the dorsal venous arch of the foot, which attaches to the great saphenous vein (GSV).

Human leg

leglegslower limb
The great saphenous vein (GSV, alternately "long saphenous vein"; ) is a large, subcutaneous, superficial vein of the leg. It is the longest vein in the body, running along the length of the lower limb, returning blood from the foot, leg and thigh to the deep femoral vein at the femoral triangle.

Anterior accessory saphenous vein

accessory saphenous vein
At the ankle, the great saphenous vein receives branches from the sole of the foot through the medial marginal vein; in the lower leg it anastomoses freely with the small saphenous vein, communicates by perforator veins (Cockett perforators) with the anterior and posterior tibial veins and receives many cutaneous veins; near the knee it communicates with the popliteal vein by the Boyd perforator, in the thigh it communicates with the femoral vein by perforator veins (Dodd perforator) and receives numerous tributaries; those from the medial and posterior parts of the thigh frequently unite to form a large accessory saphenous vein which joins the main vein near the sapheno-femoral junction.
The anterior accessory saphenous vein is a special anterior tributary of the great saphenous vein (GSV), draining the antero-lateral face of the thigh.

Superficial vein

superficial veinssuperficialsuperficial vessels
The great saphenous vein (GSV, alternately "long saphenous vein"; ) is a large, subcutaneous, superficial vein of the leg.

External pudendal veins

external pudendal veinSuperficial external pudendal veinexternal
Near the fossa ovalis it is joined by the superficial epigastric, superficial circumflex iliac vein, and superficial external pudendal veins.
The external pudendal veins (deep pudendal & superficial pudendal) are veins of the pelvis which drain into the great saphenous vein.

Thigh

thighsmedial thighmid-thighs
At the ankle, the great saphenous vein receives branches from the sole of the foot through the medial marginal vein; in the lower leg it anastomoses freely with the small saphenous vein, communicates by perforator veins (Cockett perforators) with the anterior and posterior tibial veins and receives many cutaneous veins; near the knee it communicates with the popliteal vein by the Boyd perforator, in the thigh it communicates with the femoral vein by perforator veins (Dodd perforator) and receives numerous tributaries; those from the medial and posterior parts of the thigh frequently unite to form a large accessory saphenous vein which joins the main vein near the sapheno-femoral junction. It is the longest vein in the body, running along the length of the lower limb, returning blood from the foot, leg and thigh to the deep femoral vein at the femoral triangle.
The venae perfortantes connect the deep and the superficial system, which consists of the saphenous veins (the site of varicose veins).

Femoral triangle

femoralScarpa trianglefemoral triangle area
It is the longest vein in the body, running along the length of the lower limb, returning blood from the foot, leg and thigh to the deep femoral vein at the femoral triangle.

Saphenous opening

fossa ovalisFossa ovalis (thigh)saphenous hiatus
Near the fossa ovalis it is joined by the superficial epigastric, superficial circumflex iliac vein, and superficial external pudendal veins.
It is covered by a thin perforated part of the superficial fascia called the fascia cribrosa which is pierced by the great saphenous vein, the 3 superficial branches of the femoral artery, and lymphatics.

Medial marginal vein

At the ankle, the great saphenous vein receives branches from the sole of the foot through the medial marginal vein; in the lower leg it anastomoses freely with the small saphenous vein, communicates by perforator veins (Cockett perforators) with the anterior and posterior tibial veins and receives many cutaneous veins; near the knee it communicates with the popliteal vein by the Boyd perforator, in the thigh it communicates with the femoral vein by perforator veins (Dodd perforator) and receives numerous tributaries; those from the medial and posterior parts of the thigh frequently unite to form a large accessory saphenous vein which joins the main vein near the sapheno-femoral junction.
The medial marginal vein is a continuation of the Dorsal venous arch of the foot and is the origin of the long saphenous vein.

Femoral vein

veincommon femoral veinfemoral
At the ankle, the great saphenous vein receives branches from the sole of the foot through the medial marginal vein; in the lower leg it anastomoses freely with the small saphenous vein, communicates by perforator veins (Cockett perforators) with the anterior and posterior tibial veins and receives many cutaneous veins; near the knee it communicates with the popliteal vein by the Boyd perforator, in the thigh it communicates with the femoral vein by perforator veins (Dodd perforator) and receives numerous tributaries; those from the medial and posterior parts of the thigh frequently unite to form a large accessory saphenous vein which joins the main vein near the sapheno-femoral junction. It is the longest vein in the body, running along the length of the lower limb, returning blood from the foot, leg and thigh to the deep femoral vein at the femoral triangle.

Vein graft failure

chronic graft occlusionGraft failurevein graft disease
The saphenous vein may undergo vein graft failure after engraftment, but still it has superior long-term patency compared to synthetic grafts (PTFE, PETE (Dacron)), human umbilical vein grafts or biosynthetic grafts [Omniflow].
Veins, mainly the great saphenous vein (GSV) are the most frequently used conduits in bypass surgeries (CABG or PABG), due to their ease of use and availability.

Superficial epigastric vein

superficialsuperficial epigastric
Near the fossa ovalis it is joined by the superficial epigastric, superficial circumflex iliac vein, and superficial external pudendal veins.

Varicose veins

varicose veinvaricositiesvaricose
Newer methods including endovenous laser treatment, radiofrequency ablation and foam sclerotherapy appear to work as well as surgery for varices of the greater saphenous vein.

Coronary artery bypass surgery

heart bypassbypass surgeryheart bypass surgery
The vein is often removed by cardiac surgeons and used for autotransplantation in coronary artery bypass operations, when arterial grafts are not available or many grafts are required, such as in a triple bypass or quadruple bypass.
In the other, a great saphenous vein is removed from a leg; one end is attached to the aorta or one of its major branches, and the other end is attached to the obstructed artery immediately after the obstruction to restore blood flow.

Saphena varix

dilation of the saphenous vein
A saphena varix, or a saphenous varix is a dilation of the saphenous vein at its junction with the femoral vein in the groin.

Saphenous nerve

Saphenoussaphenous branchessaphenous branches of the femoral
The saphenous nerve is a branch of the femoral nerve that runs with the great saphenous vein and can be damaged in surgery on the vein.

Venous cutdown

saphenous vein cutdown
When emergency resuscitation with fluids is necessary, and standard intravenous access cannot be achieved due to venous collapse, saphenous vein cutdown may not be necessary.
The saphenous vein is most commonly used.

Vein

veinsvenousvenous system
Often, it is used in situ (in place), after tying off smaller tributaries and destruction of the venous valves with a device called valvulotome, e.g. LeMaitre's valvulotome.
The great saphenous vein is the most important superficial vein of the lower limb.

Valvulotome

Often, it is used in situ (in place), after tying off smaller tributaries and destruction of the venous valves with a device called valvulotome, e.g. LeMaitre's valvulotome.
Since the leg veins usually contain a number of valves that direct flow towards the heart, they cannot directly be used as graft, but if vein valves are removed the arterial blood can flow via the GSV to the lower leg - this is called an in situ graft procedure, a type of vascular bypass.

Foot

feetinstepft
It is the longest vein in the body, running along the length of the lower limb, returning blood from the foot, leg and thigh to the deep femoral vein at the femoral triangle.

Deep vein

deepdeep veinsdeep vessels
It is the longest vein in the body, running along the length of the lower limb, returning blood from the foot, leg and thigh to the deep femoral vein at the femoral triangle.

Toe

halluxbig toetoes
The great saphenous vein originates from where the dorsal vein of the big toe (the hallux) merges with the dorsal venous arch of the foot.

Malleolus

medial malleoluslateral malleolusmalleoli
After passing in front of the medial malleolus (where it often can be visualized and palpated), it runs up the medial side of the leg.

Palpation

palpablepalpatedpalpate
After passing in front of the medial malleolus (where it often can be visualized and palpated), it runs up the medial side of the leg.