A report on Great saphenous vein

The great saphenous vein and landmarks along its course
Superficial veins draining into the great saphenous and femoral vein.
Superficial veins of lower limb. Superficial dissection. Anterior view.
Great saphenous vein. Deep dissection. Anterior view.
Illustration depicting veins of the leg including great saphenous vein (anterior view).

Large, subcutaneous, superficial vein of the leg.

- Great saphenous vein
The great saphenous vein and landmarks along its course

18 related topics with Alpha

Overall

Early in a coronary artery bypass operation, during vein harvesting from the legs (left of image) and the establishment of cardiopulmonary bypass by placement of an aortic cannula (bottom of image). The perfusionist and heart-lung machine are on the upper right. The patient's head (not seen) is at the bottom.

Coronary artery bypass surgery

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Surgical procedure to restore normal blood flow to an obstructed coronary artery.

Surgical procedure to restore normal blood flow to an obstructed coronary artery.

Early in a coronary artery bypass operation, during vein harvesting from the legs (left of image) and the establishment of cardiopulmonary bypass by placement of an aortic cannula (bottom of image). The perfusionist and heart-lung machine are on the upper right. The patient's head (not seen) is at the bottom.
René Gerónimo Favaloro was an Argentine cardiac surgeon and educator best known for his pioneering work on coronary artery bypass surgery using the great saphenous vein.
Three coronary artery bypass grafts, a LIMA to LAD and two saphenous vein grafts – one to the right coronary artery system and one to the obtuse marginal system.
Illustration depicting single, double, triple, and quadruple bypass
Illustration of a typical coronary artery bypass surgery. A vein from the leg is removed and grafted to the coronary artery to bypass a blockage.
Coronary artery bypass surgery during mobilization (freeing) of the right coronary artery from its surrounding tissue, adipose tissue (yellow). The tube visible at the bottom is the aortic cannula (returns blood from the HLM). The tube above it (obscured by the surgeon on the right) is the venous cannula (receives blood from the body). The patient's heart is stopped and the aorta is cross-clamped. The patient's head (not seen) is at the bottom.
Heart bypass patient showing almost invisible residual scarring. Left: days after operation. Middle: chest scar, two years later. Right: leg scar from harvested vein, two years later.
Illustration depicting coronary artery bypass surgery (double bypass)
Illustration of Single bypass
Illustration of Double bypass
Illustration of Triple bypass
Illustration of Quadruple bypass

In the other, a great saphenous vein is removed from a leg; one end is attached to the aorta or one of its major branches, and the other end is attached to the obstructed artery immediately after the obstruction to restore blood flow.

Drawing of the left femoral triangle, showing superior portion of the femoral vein.

Femoral triangle

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Anatomical region of the upper third of the thigh.

Anatomical region of the upper third of the thigh.

Drawing of the left femoral triangle, showing superior portion of the femoral vein.
Front and medial aspect of right thigh.
Borders of the femoral triangle of the Visible Human Male.
Contents of the femoral triangle of the Visible Human Male.

Femoral vein and its tributaries - The vein lies medial to the femoral artery at the base of the triangle but as it approaches the apex of the triangle, it lies posteromedially to the femoral artery. It receives drainage from great saphenous vein, circumflex veins, and veins corresponding to the branches of the femoral artery here.

The main veins in the human body

Vein

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Veins are blood vessels in humans, and most other animals that carry blood towards the heart.

Veins are blood vessels in humans, and most other animals that carry blood towards the heart.

The main veins in the human body
Branches of inferior vena cava
Video of venous valve in action
Venous valves prevent reverse blood flow.
Human anatomical chart of blood vessels, with heart, lungs, liver and kidneys included. Other organs are numbered and arranged around it. Before cutting out the figures on this page, Vesalius suggests that readers glue the page onto parchment and gives instructions on how to assemble the pieces and paste the multilayered figure onto a base "muscle man" illustration. "Epitome", fol.14a. HMD Collection, WZ 240 V575dhZ 1543.
Image of veins from William Harvey's Exercitatio Anatomica de Motu Cordis et Sanguinis in Animalibus

The great saphenous vein is the most important superficial vein of the lower limb.

Vein graft failure

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Condition in which vein grafts, which are used as alternative conduits in bypass surgeries (e.g. CABG), get occluded.

Condition in which vein grafts, which are used as alternative conduits in bypass surgeries (e.g. CABG), get occluded.

Veins, mainly the great saphenous vein (GSV) are the most frequently used conduits in bypass surgeries (CABG or PABG), due to their ease of use and availability.

Medial marginal vein

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The medial marginal vein is a continuation of the Dorsal venous arch of the foot and is the origin of the long saphenous vein.

Venous cutdown

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Emergency procedure in which the vein is exposed surgically and then a cannula is inserted into the vein under direct vision.

Emergency procedure in which the vein is exposed surgically and then a cannula is inserted into the vein under direct vision.

The saphenous vein is most commonly used.

The left femoral triangle. (Superficial external pudendal vessels labeled at upper left.)

External pudendal veins

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The left femoral triangle. (Superficial external pudendal vessels labeled at upper left.)
Anterior abdominal wall. Superficial dissection. Anterior view.
Anterior abdominal wall. Intermediate dissection. Anterior view
Superficial veins of lower limb. Superficial dissection. Anterior view.

The external pudendal veins (deep pudendal & superficial pudendal) are veins of the pelvis which drain into the great saphenous vein.

Valvulotome

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Medical device used to destroy the venous valves in especially the great saphenous vein to allow for arterial flow.

Medical device used to destroy the venous valves in especially the great saphenous vein to allow for arterial flow.

Since the leg veins usually contain a number of valves that direct flow towards the heart, they cannot directly be used as graft, but if vein valves are removed the arterial blood can flow via the GSV to the lower leg - this is called an in situ graft procedure, a type of vascular bypass.