A report on Poland and Greater Poland

A map of Greater Poland/Great Poland during Piast period from the Codex diplomaticus Maioris Poloniae, based on data from historical documents
A reconstruction of a Bronze Age, Lusatian culture settlement in Biskupin, 8th century BC
A map of Polish dialects. The area where Greater Poland's dialect is spoken is marked in violet.
Poland under the rule of Mieszko I, whose acceptance of Christianity under the auspices of the Latin Church and the Baptism of Poland marked the beginning of statehood in 966.
Poznań Town Hall
Casimir III the Great is the only Polish king to receive the title of Great. He built extensively during his reign, and reformed the Polish army along with the country's legal code, 1333–70.
Palace of the Raczyński family in Rogalin, within the Rogalin Landscape Park
The Battle of Grunwald was fought against the German Order of Teutonic Knights, and resulted in a decisive victory for the Kingdom of Poland, 15 July 1410.
Gniezno cathedral
Wawel Castle in Kraków, seat of Polish kings from 1038 until the capital was moved to Warsaw in 1596.
Kalisz Town Hall
King John III Sobieski defeated the Ottoman Turks at the Battle of Vienna on 12 September 1683.
Leszno town hall
Stanisław II Augustus, the last King of Poland, reigned from 1764 until his abdication on 25 November 1795.
Marian sanctuary in Licheń near Konin
The partitions of Poland, carried out by the Kingdom of Prussia (blue), the Russian Empire (brown), and the Austrian Habsburg Monarchy (green) in 1772, 1793 and 1795.
Chief of State Marshal Józef Piłsudski was a hero of the Polish independence campaign and the nation's premiere statesman from 1918 until his death on 12 May 1935.
Polish Army 7TP tanks on military manoeuvres shortly before the invasion of Poland in 1939
Pilots of the 303 Polish Fighter Squadron during the Battle of Britain, October 1940
Map of the Holocaust in German-occupied Poland with deportation routes and massacre sites. Major ghettos are marked with yellow stars. Nazi extermination camps are marked with white skulls in black squares. The border in 1941 between Nazi Germany and the Soviet Union is marked in red.
At High Noon, 4 June 1989 — political poster featuring Gary Cooper to encourage votes for the Solidarity party in the 1989 elections
Flowers in front of the Presidential Palace following the death of Poland's top government officials in a plane crash on 10 April 2010
Topographic map of Poland
Morskie Oko alpine lake in the Tatra Mountains. Poland has one of the highest densities of lakes in the world.
The wisent, one of Poland's national animals, is commonly found at the ancient and UNESCO-protected Białowieża Forest.
The Sejm is the lower house of the parliament of Poland.
The Constitution of 3 May adopted in 1791 was the first modern constitution in Europe.
The Ministry of Foreign Affairs, located in Warsaw
Polish Air Force F-16s, a single-engine multirole fighter aircraft
A Mercedes-Benz Sprinter patrol van belonging to the Polish State Police Service (Policja)
The Old City of Zamość is a UNESCO World Heritage Site.
PKP Intercity Pendolino at the Wrocław railway station
Physicist and chemist Maria Skłodowska-Curie was the first person to win two Nobel Prizes.
Nicolaus Copernicus, the 16th century Polish astronomer who formulated the heliocentric model of the solar system.
Population of Poland from 1900 to 2010 in millions of inhabitants
Dolina Jadwigi — a bilingual Polish-Kashubian road sign with the village name
John Paul II, born Karol Wojtyła, held the papacy between 1978-2005 and was the first Pole to become a Roman Catholic Pope.
Jagiellonian University in Kraków
The Polish White Eagle is Poland's enduring national and cultural symbol
All Saints' Day on 1 November is one of the most important public holidays in Poland.
Lady with an Ermine (1490) by Leonardo da Vinci. It symbolises Poland's cultural heritage and identity.
Selection of hearty traditional comfort food from Poland, including bigos, gołąbki, żurek, pierogi, placki ziemniaczane, and rye bread.
Traditional polonaise dresses, 1780–1785.
Andrzej Wajda, the recipient of an Honorary Oscar, the Palme d'Or, as well as Honorary Golden Lion and Golden Bear Awards.
Headquarters of the publicly funded national television network TVP in Warsaw
The Stadion Narodowy in Warsaw, home of the national football team, and one of the host stadiums of Euro 2012.
The Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth at its greatest extent in 1619

Greater Poland, often known by its Polish name Wielkopolska (Großpolen, Polonia Maior), is a historical region of west-central Poland.

- Greater Poland

The name is derived from the Polans, a West Slavic tribe who inhabited the Warta River basin of present-day Greater Poland region (6th–8th century CE).

- Poland

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Poznań

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14th-century seal showing Poznań's coat of arms
Monument of Mieszko I and Boleslaus I the Brave, Golden Chapel at the Poznań Cathedral
Poznań Cathedral (center) and the smaller Church of Holy Virgin Mary to its right, standing on the site of the original ducal residence
Royal Castle after its total reconstruction
Poznań, c. undefined 1617, view from the north
Interior details in the Parish Church, or simply Fara, built in 1651–1701. One of the most stunning and best preserved examples of baroque architecture in Poland
Raczyński Library (1828) at Liberty Square in 2016
Old Market Square in 1934. The Odwach guardhouse and the 1893's New Town Hall, which was not rebuilt after World War II
The skyline of Poznań, as seen from the east bank of the Warta river
Malta lake, the Mound of Freedom and artificial ski slope Malta-ski
Administrative division into 42 osiedla auxiliary units since 2011
The pre-1990 city division into main districts dzielnica, which are still retained for some administrative purposes
Bałtyk office building
A view of Stary Browar, Poznań Financial Centre, and Andersia Tower from the Collegium Altum of the University of Economics
Historical Herbrand B3/H0 horse-drawn tram used in Poznań between 1880 and 1898
The Renaissance Town Hall from 1560 served as the seat of local government until 1939 and now houses a museum
Grand Theatre behind Adama Mickiewicza Park
St. Martin's croissant
Collegium Minus of the Adam Mickiewicz University
AMU's Faculty of Political Science and Journalism at the Campus Morasko
Faculty of Chemical Technologies – Poznań University of Technology
Academy of Music
Municipal Stadium
Hala Arena before planned modernization
Poznań Główny – main railway station
Greater Poland Railways train at the Poznań Główny
A2 motorway before the six-lane expansion done in 2019
Moderus Gamma tram, which is produced near Poznań, in city's eastern underground section
City Bike's station
Solaris bus; they are also produced near Poznań
Eurocopter EC135 Lifeguard 9 waiting for an emergency dispatch at the Ławica Airport
Freedom Square (Plac Wolności)
Imperial Castle, now the Zamek Culture Centre
Merchant houses, originally 16th century's herring stalls, at the Old Market Square
Bamberka fountain at the Old Market Square
Śródka's Tale Mural in 2015
Stary Browar, Kufel by Wojciech Kujawski (Guinness ratified largest beer mug in the world), and Art Stations Foundation gallery in the background
Poznań Goat mascot, Old Market Square
Rogalin's Raczyński Palace within Rogalin Landscape Park, some 8 mi south of Poznań. Rear view

Poznań is a city on the River Warta in west-central Poland, within the Greater Poland region.

Gniezno

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Medieval seal of Gniezno
King Władysław IV Vasa confirms the old privileges of Gniezno, 1635
19th-century painting of Gniezno
Memorial at the site of a German execution of 24 Poles in November 1939 in the Dalki district
Gniezno during the visit of Pope John Paul II in 1979
View of Cathedral Basilica of the Assumption of the Blessed Virgin Mary and St. Adalbert. On the right side - church under the invocation of St. John the Baptist
Panorama of Gniezno. 19th century
Gniezno Old Town
Aleksander Fredro Theatre in Gniezno
Regional court
Gniezno Doors in the Cathedral
Coffin of Adalbert of Prague in the Cathedral
Market Square (Rynek)
Holy Trinity church
Franciscan church
Gothic Saint John the Baptist church in winter
Saint Lawrence church
Monument of King Bolesław I the Brave with the Cathedral in the background
Museum of the Polish State Origins
Museum of Archdiocese in Gniezno
Episcopal palace of Primates of Poland
Saint George's Church

Gniezno (Gnesen) is a city in central-western Poland, about 50 km east of Poznań, with 68,943 inhabitants making it the sixth-largest city in the Greater Poland Voivodeship.

The emperor and the Polish duke celebrated the foundation of the Polish ecclesiastical province (archbishopric) in Gniezno, along with newly established bishoprics in Kołobrzeg for Pomerania; Wrocław for Silesia; Kraków for Lesser Poland in addition to the bishopric in Poznań for western Greater Poland, which was established in 968.

Lesser Poland

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Wawel Castle in Kraków
Old Town in Lublin
Mannerist architecture in Tarnów
The Lesser Poland Province of the Polish Crown in the widest sense – with Red Ruthenia, Podlachia, Podolia and Kiev
Palm Sunday in Lipnica Murowana.
The 1507 Lesser Poland and Red Ruthenia Map (Polonia Minor, Russia) by Martin Waldseemüller
Kazimierz Dolny on the right bank of the Vistula river.
Niepołomice
Pieniny National Park
Będzin Castle, which guarded the western border of Lesser Poland
Kozłówka Palace
Palatial residence in Kurozwęki
Pieskowa Skała
Members of the regional Folk Group of Wilamowice "Cepelia Fil Wilamowice"
Lachy Sądeckie are a group of ethnic Poles who live in southern Lesser Poland
Broad Gauge Metallurgy Line
Czarny Staw (Black Pond) in the High Tatras
Nowy Wiśnicz
Baranów Sandomierski
Vistula in Sandomierz
"Peasant war" by Jan Lewicki (1795–1871)
Galizien
In the 19th century, Kraków's Jagiellonian University was a major center of Polish science and culture
Gorals from Beskidy
Castle of Bobolice
Wieliczka Salt Mine, a UNESCO World Heritage Site
Pope John Paul II was born in Wadowice, Lesser Poland, in 1920
Soldiers of Holy Cross Mountains Brigade in parade 1945
A fire engine made by FSC Star in Lesser Poland's Starachowice
Boundary between Lesser Poland and Upper Silesia (red line) on the territory of current Silesian Voivodeship
Kraków is the capital of Lesser Poland
Lublin, the second-largest city of Lesser Poland
Częstochowa, the third-largest city of Lesser Poland
Radom, the fourth-largest city of Lesser Poland
Sosnowiec, the fifth-largest city of Lesser Poland
Folklore group in Podhale costume, Bukowina Tatrzańska, Lesser Poland, 2016
Polish flat soda bread (known as Proziaki in podkarpacie)
KS Cracovia on Independence Day 2019
A map of Polish dialects. The area where Lesser Poland's dialect is spoken is marked in orange.

Lesser Poland, often known by its Polish name Małopolska (Polonia Minor), is a historical region situated in southern and south-eastern Poland.

Unlike other historical parts of the country, such as Kujawy, Mazovia, Podlachia, Pomerania, or Greater Poland, Lesser Poland is mainly hilly, with Poland's highest peak, Rysy, located within the borders of the province.

Mazovia

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Historical lands of Mazovia
Castle of the Mazovian Dukes in Czersk, 1410
Janusz III of Masovia, Stanisław and Anna of Masovia, 1520
Tombstone of Janusz III and his brother Stanisław in St. John's Archcathedral, Warsaw
Folk costumes from Łowicz sub-region
Birthplace of Fryderyk Chopin in Żelazowa Wola
Warsaw Old Town
Płock Castle
Łomża Cathedral
Sokół Palace in Pruszków
Castle in Rawa Mazowiecka
Regional museum in Ostrołęka
Market Square in Pułtusk
Niepokalanów
Góra Kalwaria
Ciechanów Castle
Nieborów Palace
Łowicz Cathedral
St. Jacob Church in Skierniewice

Mazovia or Masovia (Mazowsze) is a historical region in mid-north-eastern Poland.

Mazovia has a landscape without hills (in contrast to Lesser Poland) and without lakes (in contrast to Greater Poland).

Allegory of the first partition of Poland, showing Catherine the Great of Russia (left), Joseph II of Austria and Frederick the Great of Prussia (right) quarrelling over their territorial seizures

Partitions of Poland

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Allegory of the first partition of Poland, showing Catherine the Great of Russia (left), Joseph II of Austria and Frederick the Great of Prussia (right) quarrelling over their territorial seizures
Włodzimierz Tetmajer, Allegory of Dead Poland, St. Nicholas Cathedral, Kalisz
The Polish–Lithuanian Commonwealth after the First Partition, as a protectorate of the Russian Empire (1773–89)
Rejtan at Sejm 1773, oil on canvas by Jan Matejko, 1866, 282 x, Royal Castle in Warsaw
The Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth after the Second Partition (1793)
1793 Russian campaign medal
"A map of the Kingdom of Poland and the Grand Duchy of Lithuania including Samogitia and Curland divided according to their dismemberments with the Kingdom of Prussia" from 1799
The partition of Poland according to the German–Soviet Pact; division of Polish territories in the years 1939–1941

The Partitions of Poland were three partitions of the Polish–Lithuanian Commonwealth that took place toward the end of the 18th century and ended the existence of the state, resulting in the elimination of sovereign Poland and Lithuania for 123 years.

Frederick II of Prussia was elated with his success; Prussia took most of Royal Prussia (without Danzig) that stood between its possessions in the Kingdom of Prussia and the Margraviate of Brandenburg, as well as Ermland (Warmia), northern areas of Greater Poland along the Noteć River (the Netze District), and parts of Kuyavia (but not the city of Toruń).

Entrance of Jan Henryk Dąbrowski to Poznań painted by Jan Gładysz

Greater Poland uprising (1806)

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Entrance of Jan Henryk Dąbrowski to Poznań painted by Jan Gładysz

Greater Poland uprising of 1806 was a Polish military insurrection which occurred in the region of Wielkopolska, also known as Greater Poland, against the occupying Prussian forces after the Partitions of the Polish–Lithuanian Commonwealth (1772–1795).

The uprising was organized by General Jan Henryk Dąbrowski to help advancing French forces under Napoleon in liberating Poland from Prussian occupation.

Province of Posen

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Province of the Kingdom of Prussia from 1848 to 1920.

Province of the Kingdom of Prussia from 1848 to 1920.

Posen (red) within Prussia (white) and the German Empire (white, beige and red)
1919 German army permit to enter the Polish territory of Posen, just ceded to Poland.
Posen (red) within Prussia (white) and the German Empire (white, beige and red)
Province of Posen, 1905, Polish-speaking areas according to Prussian census shown in yellow
Regierungsbezirke Posen (pink) and Bromberg (green) and Kreise subdivisions
Language situation in the province of Posen according to the Prussian census of 1910.

Posen (present-day Poznań, Poland) was the provincial capital.

The 29000 km2 area roughly corresponded to the historic region of Greater Poland.

Seal of King Władysław

Władysław I Łokietek

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Władysław I Łokietek, in English known as the "Elbow-high" or Ladislaus the Short (c.

Władysław I Łokietek, in English known as the "Elbow-high" or Ladislaus the Short (c.

Seal of King Władysław
Edict by Władysław the Short in 1325 confirming the Cistercians of Byszewo continue to have the same rights as under German law, and the continued ownership of their Abbey in Byszewo.
Sulejów Abbey is the place where the decision was made to send a letter to the Pope asking for the coronation of Władysław
King Władysław the Elbow-high breaking off agreements with the Teutonic Knights at Brześć Kujawski, a painting by Jan Matejko in the National Museum in Warsaw
Władysław I Łokietek, by Jan Matejko
Royal seal of Władysław the Elbow-high
The so-called Crown of Bolesław the Brave was made for Władysław I.<ref>Rożek Michał, Polskie koronacje i korony, Kraków 1987. {{ISBN|83-03-01914-7}}</ref>
In 1320 the King began the building of a new Wawel Cathedral.<ref>Kraków, Małgorzta Woszczenko</ref>
Portrait of King Władysław I by Aleksander Lesser
The tomb of the monarch inside the Wawel Cathedral
Poland between 1275 and 1300.
Władysław I on White Horse by M. Barwicki.

He temporarily took control of part of Greater Poland after the death of his ally Przemysł II, lost it, and then subsequently regained it.

English translation: Vladislaus by the grace of God duke of the Kingdom of Poland, and lord of Pomerania, Kuyavia, Łęczyca and Sieradz

Polish historical regions in current borders

Polish historical regions

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Polish historical regions in current borders

Polish historic regions are regions that were related to a former Polish state, or are within present-day Poland, with or without being identified in its administrative divisions.

Greater Poland (Wielkopolska, Polonia Maior), the nucleus of Polish statehood, during the Partitions of Poland renamed together with Kuyavia, Łęczyca-Sieradz Land and northern part of Mazovia as South Prussia, later made a part of the Napoleonic Duchy of Warsaw, after its dissolution partially in Congress Poland, later Vistula Land, a historical region of Russia, while the other part was in Hohenzollern-ruled Grand Duchy of Posen outside the German Confederation, later renamed Province of Posen, finally annexed upon the establishment of North German Confederation by Germany, thus forming a German historical region

Warta

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Warta River in Gorzów Wielkopolski
Warta River near Kostrzyn

The river Warta (, ; Warthe ; Varta) rises in central Poland and meanders greatly north-west to flow into the Oder, against the German border.

The Warta rises in the Kraków-Częstochowa Upland at Kromołów in Zawiercie, Silesian Voivodeship, flows through Łódź Land, Greater Poland and Lubusz Land, where it empties into the Oder near Kostrzyn at the border with Germany.