A report on Greater Poland and South Prussia

South Prussia 1795–1806
A map of Greater Poland/Great Poland during Piast period from the Codex diplomaticus Maioris Poloniae, based on data from historical documents
Map South Prussia (Südpreussen) and the Departments of Posen, Kalisch, and Warschau, 1801-1807
A map of Polish dialects. The area where Greater Poland's dialect is spoken is marked in violet.
Poznań Town Hall
Palace of the Raczyński family in Rogalin, within the Rogalin Landscape Park
Gniezno cathedral
Kalisz Town Hall
Leszno town hall
Marian sanctuary in Licheń near Konin

the Poznań, Kalisz and Gniezno Voivodeships of Greater Poland;

- South Prussia

In the second partition (1793) the whole of Greater Poland was absorbed by Prussia, becoming part of the province of South Prussia.

- Greater Poland

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Grand Duchy of Posen

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Part of the Kingdom of Prussia, created from territories annexed by Prussia after the Partitions of Poland, and formally established following the Napoleonic Wars in 1815.

Part of the Kingdom of Prussia, created from territories annexed by Prussia after the Partitions of Poland, and formally established following the Napoleonic Wars in 1815.

The Grand Duchy of Posen (red) in 1848.
The Prussian Province of Posen. Yellow colour: Polish-speaking areas according to German authorities, as of 1905
The Grand Duchy of Posen (red) in 1848.
Grand Duchy of Posen (light blue) after its creation, in 1815

Originally part of the Kingdom of Poland, this area largely coincided with Greater Poland.

It was initially administered as the province of South Prussia.

Poznań

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14th-century seal showing Poznań's coat of arms
Monument of Mieszko I and Boleslaus I the Brave, Golden Chapel at the Poznań Cathedral
Poznań Cathedral (center) and the smaller Church of Holy Virgin Mary to its right, standing on the site of the original ducal residence
Royal Castle after its total reconstruction
Poznań, c. undefined 1617, view from the north
Interior details in the Parish Church, or simply Fara, built in 1651–1701. One of the most stunning and best preserved examples of baroque architecture in Poland
Raczyński Library (1828) at Liberty Square in 2016
Old Market Square in 1934. The Odwach guardhouse and the 1893's New Town Hall, which was not rebuilt after World War II
The skyline of Poznań, as seen from the east bank of the Warta river
Malta lake, the Mound of Freedom and artificial ski slope Malta-ski
Administrative division into 42 osiedla auxiliary units since 2011
The pre-1990 city division into main districts dzielnica, which are still retained for some administrative purposes
Bałtyk office building
A view of Stary Browar, Poznań Financial Centre, and Andersia Tower from the Collegium Altum of the University of Economics
Historical Herbrand B3/H0 horse-drawn tram used in Poznań between 1880 and 1898
The Renaissance Town Hall from 1560 served as the seat of local government until 1939 and now houses a museum
Grand Theatre behind Adama Mickiewicza Park
St. Martin's croissant
Collegium Minus of the Adam Mickiewicz University
AMU's Faculty of Political Science and Journalism at the Campus Morasko
Faculty of Chemical Technologies – Poznań University of Technology
Academy of Music
Municipal Stadium
Hala Arena before planned modernization
Poznań Główny – main railway station
Greater Poland Railways train at the Poznań Główny
A2 motorway before the six-lane expansion done in 2019
Moderus Gamma tram, which is produced near Poznań, in city's eastern underground section
City Bike's station
Solaris bus; they are also produced near Poznań
Eurocopter EC135 Lifeguard 9 waiting for an emergency dispatch at the Ławica Airport
Freedom Square (Plac Wolności)
Imperial Castle, now the Zamek Culture Centre
Merchant houses, originally 16th century's herring stalls, at the Old Market Square
Bamberka fountain at the Old Market Square
Śródka's Tale Mural in 2015
Stary Browar, Kufel by Wojciech Kujawski (Guinness ratified largest beer mug in the world), and Art Stations Foundation gallery in the background
Poznań Goat mascot, Old Market Square
Rogalin's Raczyński Palace within Rogalin Landscape Park, some 8 mi south of Poznań. Rear view

Poznań is a city on the River Warta in west-central Poland, within the Greater Poland region.

However, in 1793, in the Second Partition of Poland, Poznań came under the control of the Kingdom of Prussia, becoming part of (and initially the seat of) the province of South Prussia.

Poznań Voivodeship (14th century – 1793)

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Unit of administrative division and local government in Poland from the 14th century to the Second Partition of Poland in 1793.

Unit of administrative division and local government in Poland from the 14th century to the Second Partition of Poland in 1793.

Poznań Voivodeship in
the Polish–Lithuanian Commonwealth, 1635.
Poznań Voivodeship in
the Polish–Lithuanian Commonwealth, 1635.

It was part of the Greater Polish prowincja.

In the course of the First Partition of Poland in 1772, the voivodeship lost the northern area around Wałcz to the Prussian Netze District, the remains were annexed in 1793 and incorporated into the province of South Prussia.

Entrance of Jan Henryk Dąbrowski to Poznań painted by Jan Gładysz

Greater Poland uprising (1806)

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Entrance of Jan Henryk Dąbrowski to Poznań painted by Jan Gładysz

Greater Poland uprising of 1806 was a Polish military insurrection which occurred in the region of Wielkopolska, also known as Greater Poland, against the occupying Prussian forces after the Partitions of the Polish–Lithuanian Commonwealth (1772–1795).

Napoleon, counting on the benefits of gaining control over lands on the other side of Prussia, sent a group of emissaries to South Prussia to collect information about the situation in the province and the sympathies of the Polish citizens.

Netze District in 1786

Netze District

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Territory in the Kingdom of Prussia from 1772 until 1807.

Territory in the Kingdom of Prussia from 1772 until 1807.

Netze District in 1786

Beside Royal Prussia, a land of the Polish Crown since 1466, King Frederick II of Prussia also seized the adjacent lands of the Prowincja of Greater Poland to the south from the Polish–Lithuanian Commonwealth in the First Partition of Poland of 1772.

With the 1793 Second Partition of Poland, the remainder of the Greater Polish province was annexed by Prussia and formed the new province of South Prussia.

Duchy of Warsaw

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Polish client state of the French Empire established by Napoleon Bonaparte in 1807, during the Napoleonic Wars.

Polish client state of the French Empire established by Napoleon Bonaparte in 1807, during the Napoleonic Wars.

The Duchy of Warsaw in 1812
Prince Józef Poniatowski, Commander in Chief of the Army of the Duchy of Warsaw, by Josef Grassi
The Duchy of Warsaw in 1812
Polish uhlans from the Army of the Duchy of Warsaw, 1807–1815. Painting by January Suchodolski
Map of the Duchy of Warsaw, 1807–1809
Map of the Duchy of Warsaw, 1809–1815
Napoleon conferring the Constitution in 1807

The Kulmerland and Gdansk (Danzig) became part of the Province of West Prussia; the remaining territories (i.e., Greater Poland/Poznań), which covered an area of approximately 29000 km2, were reconstituted into the Grand Duchy of Posen.

The Prussian territory was made up of territory from the former Prussian provinces of New East Prussia, Southern Prussia, New Silesia, and West Prussia.

Lesser Poland

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Historical region situated in southern and south-eastern Poland.

Historical region situated in southern and south-eastern Poland.

Wawel Castle in Kraków
Old Town in Lublin
Mannerist architecture in Tarnów
The Lesser Poland Province of the Polish Crown in the widest sense – with Red Ruthenia, Podlachia, Podolia and Kiev
Palm Sunday in Lipnica Murowana.
The 1507 Lesser Poland and Red Ruthenia Map (Polonia Minor, Russia) by Martin Waldseemüller
Kazimierz Dolny on the right bank of the Vistula river.
Niepołomice
Pieniny National Park
Będzin Castle, which guarded the western border of Lesser Poland
Kozłówka Palace
Palatial residence in Kurozwęki
Pieskowa Skała
Members of the regional Folk Group of Wilamowice "Cepelia Fil Wilamowice"
Lachy Sądeckie are a group of ethnic Poles who live in southern Lesser Poland
Broad Gauge Metallurgy Line
Czarny Staw (Black Pond) in the High Tatras
Nowy Wiśnicz
Baranów Sandomierski
Vistula in Sandomierz
"Peasant war" by Jan Lewicki (1795–1871)
Galizien
In the 19th century, Kraków's Jagiellonian University was a major center of Polish science and culture
Gorals from Beskidy
Castle of Bobolice
Wieliczka Salt Mine, a UNESCO World Heritage Site
Pope John Paul II was born in Wadowice, Lesser Poland, in 1920
Soldiers of Holy Cross Mountains Brigade in parade 1945
A fire engine made by FSC Star in Lesser Poland's Starachowice
Boundary between Lesser Poland and Upper Silesia (red line) on the territory of current Silesian Voivodeship
Kraków is the capital of Lesser Poland
Lublin, the second-largest city of Lesser Poland
Częstochowa, the third-largest city of Lesser Poland
Radom, the fourth-largest city of Lesser Poland
Sosnowiec, the fifth-largest city of Lesser Poland
Folklore group in Podhale costume, Bukowina Tatrzańska, Lesser Poland, 2016
Polish flat soda bread (known as Proziaki in podkarpacie)
KS Cracovia on Independence Day 2019
A map of Polish dialects. The area where Lesser Poland's dialect is spoken is marked in orange.

Unlike other historical parts of the country, such as Kujawy, Mazovia, Podlachia, Pomerania, or Greater Poland, Lesser Poland is mainly hilly, with Poland's highest peak, Rysy, located within the borders of the province.

However, the Prussians moved on, and in 1793 they annexed northwestern corner of the province, together with the city of Częstochowa, and its vicinity, which became part of the newly created province of South Prussia.