A report on Greater Poland

A map of Greater Poland/Great Poland during Piast period from the Codex diplomaticus Maioris Poloniae, based on data from historical documents
A map of Polish dialects. The area where Greater Poland's dialect is spoken is marked in violet.
Poznań Town Hall
Palace of the Raczyński family in Rogalin, within the Rogalin Landscape Park
Gniezno cathedral
Kalisz Town Hall
Leszno town hall
Marian sanctuary in Licheń near Konin

Historical region of west-central Poland.

- Greater Poland

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Allegory of the first partition of Poland, showing Catherine the Great of Russia (left), Joseph II of Austria and Frederick the Great of Prussia (right) quarrelling over their territorial seizures

Partitions of Poland

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The Partitions of Poland were three partitions of the Polish–Lithuanian Commonwealth that took place toward the end of the 18th century and ended the existence of the state, resulting in the elimination of sovereign Poland and Lithuania for 123 years.

The Partitions of Poland were three partitions of the Polish–Lithuanian Commonwealth that took place toward the end of the 18th century and ended the existence of the state, resulting in the elimination of sovereign Poland and Lithuania for 123 years.

Allegory of the first partition of Poland, showing Catherine the Great of Russia (left), Joseph II of Austria and Frederick the Great of Prussia (right) quarrelling over their territorial seizures
Włodzimierz Tetmajer, Allegory of Dead Poland, St. Nicholas Cathedral, Kalisz
The Polish–Lithuanian Commonwealth after the First Partition, as a protectorate of the Russian Empire (1773–89)
Rejtan at Sejm 1773, oil on canvas by Jan Matejko, 1866, 282 x, Royal Castle in Warsaw
The Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth after the Second Partition (1793)
1793 Russian campaign medal
"A map of the Kingdom of Poland and the Grand Duchy of Lithuania including Samogitia and Curland divided according to their dismemberments with the Kingdom of Prussia" from 1799
The partition of Poland according to the German–Soviet Pact; division of Polish territories in the years 1939–1941

Frederick II of Prussia was elated with his success; Prussia took most of Royal Prussia (without Danzig) that stood between its possessions in the Kingdom of Prussia and the Margraviate of Brandenburg, as well as Ermland (Warmia), northern areas of Greater Poland along the Noteć River (the Netze District), and parts of Kuyavia (but not the city of Toruń).

Mazovia

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Historical region in mid-north-eastern Poland.

Historical region in mid-north-eastern Poland.

Historical lands of Mazovia
Castle of the Mazovian Dukes in Czersk, 1410
Janusz III of Masovia, Stanisław and Anna of Masovia, 1520
Tombstone of Janusz III and his brother Stanisław in St. John's Archcathedral, Warsaw
Folk costumes from Łowicz sub-region
Birthplace of Fryderyk Chopin in Żelazowa Wola
Warsaw Old Town
Płock Castle
Łomża Cathedral
Sokół Palace in Pruszków
Castle in Rawa Mazowiecka
Regional museum in Ostrołęka
Market Square in Pułtusk
Niepokalanów
Góra Kalwaria
Ciechanów Castle
Nieborów Palace
Łowicz Cathedral
St. Jacob Church in Skierniewice

Mazovia has a landscape without hills (in contrast to Lesser Poland) and without lakes (in contrast to Greater Poland).

Kingdom of Poland between 1304 and 1333, including the Duchy of Grater Poland.

Duchy of Greater Poland

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Kingdom of Poland between 1304 and 1333, including the Duchy of Grater Poland.
Fragmentation of Poland in 1138:
Map of the 13th-century Duchy of Greater Poland. Territories lost in the 13th century marked in yellow (Lubusz Land) and green (northwestern Greater Poland)
Ducal seal of Władysław Odonic, 1231
The rebuilt Royal Castle, Poznań in Poznań

The Duchy of Greater Poland was a district principality in Greater Poland that was a fiefdom of the Kingdom of Poland.

Piła

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City in northwestern Poland and capital of Piła County, situated in the Greater Poland Voivodeship.

City in northwestern Poland and capital of Piła County, situated in the Greater Poland Voivodeship.

During the reign of King Casimir IV Jagiellon Piła became a royal city of the Kingdom of Poland
King Stephen Báthory confirmed old privileges of Piła in 1576 and moved the weekly market from Thursdays to Mondays
Birthplace of Stanisław Staszic, a leading figure of Polish Enlightenment
19th-century lithograph of the city
Barracks in Piła in 1915
Pre-war Polish Consulate, today a museum
A monument commemorating Poles imprisoned in the German Nazi camp Albatros in 1939
Piła Główna railway station
The Holy Family Church in Piła
Police School in Piła
Town Hall
Stanisław Staszic monument in Piła

It had 73,791 inhabitants as of 2017 making it the fourth-largest city in the voivodeship after Poznań, Kalisz and Konin and is the largest city in the northern part of Greater Poland.

Polish historical regions in current borders

Polish historical regions

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Polish historic regions are regions that were related to a former Polish state, or are within present-day Poland, with or without being identified in its administrative divisions.

Polish historic regions are regions that were related to a former Polish state, or are within present-day Poland, with or without being identified in its administrative divisions.

Polish historical regions in current borders

Greater Poland (Wielkopolska, Polonia Maior), the nucleus of Polish statehood, during the Partitions of Poland renamed together with Kuyavia, Łęczyca-Sieradz Land and northern part of Mazovia as South Prussia, later made a part of the Napoleonic Duchy of Warsaw, after its dissolution partially in Congress Poland, later Vistula Land, a historical region of Russia, while the other part was in Hohenzollern-ruled Grand Duchy of Posen outside the German Confederation, later renamed Province of Posen, finally annexed upon the establishment of North German Confederation by Germany, thus forming a German historical region

Province of Posen

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Province of the Kingdom of Prussia from 1848 to 1920.

Province of the Kingdom of Prussia from 1848 to 1920.

Posen (red) within Prussia (white) and the German Empire (white, beige and red)
1919 German army permit to enter the Polish territory of Posen, just ceded to Poland.
Posen (red) within Prussia (white) and the German Empire (white, beige and red)
Province of Posen, 1905, Polish-speaking areas according to Prussian census shown in yellow
Regierungsbezirke Posen (pink) and Bromberg (green) and Kreise subdivisions
Language situation in the province of Posen according to the Prussian census of 1910.

The 29000 km2 area roughly corresponded to the historic region of Greater Poland.

Mieszko's seal from 1145

Mieszko III the Old

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Mieszko III the Old (c.

Mieszko III the Old (c.

Mieszko's seal from 1145
Casimir's acquisitions (in green)
Poland under the sons of Bolesław Wrymouth:
Seniorate Province of Władysław II
Silesian Province of Władysław II
Masovian Province of Bolesław IV
Greater Poland Province of Mieszko III
Sandomierz Province of Henry 
Łęczyca Land of Salomea
Pomeranian vassals
Greater Poland under Mieszko III:
Poznań, held by Odon 1177–82
Poznań, held by Odon 1177–1194, by Władysław III 1194–1202
Kalisz, conquered in 1181, held by Mieszko the Younger 1191–93, by Odon 1193–94
Gniezno, conquered in 1181 
Kuyavia, held by Bolesław 1186–95

According to the 1138 Testament of Bolesław III, Mieszko received the newly established Duchy of Greater Poland, comprising the western part of the short-lived Greater Poland.

West Slavs of the 9th–10th centuries

Polans (western)

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West Slavs of the 9th–10th centuries
A fragment of the Gesta Hammaburgensis ecclesiae pontificum (1073) by Adam of Bremen containing the name Polans – trans Oddaram sunt Polanos.

The Western Polans (also known as Polanes, Polanians; Polanie, derived from Old Slavic pole, "field" or "plain", from Proto-Indo-European *pleh₂- "flatland") were a West Slavic and Lechitic tribe, inhabiting the Warta River basin of the contemporary Greater Poland region starting in the 6th century.

Inowrocław Voivodeship in
the Polish–Lithuanian Commonwealth in 1635.

Inowrocław Voivodeship

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Unit of administrative division and local government in Poland from the 14th century to the First Partition of Poland in 1772.

Unit of administrative division and local government in Poland from the 14th century to the First Partition of Poland in 1772.

Inowrocław Voivodeship in
the Polish–Lithuanian Commonwealth in 1635.
Inowrocław Voivodeship in
the Polish–Lithuanian Commonwealth in 1635.
Inowrocław Voivodeship in
the Polish–Lithuanian Commonwealth in 1635.

Together with the neighbouring Brześć Kujawski Voivodeship it was part of the Kuyavia region and the Greater Polish prowincja.

Łęczyca Voivodeship of the Polish–Lithuanian Commonwealth.

Łęczyca Voivodeship

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Unit of administrative division and local government in Poland from the 14th century until the partitions of Poland in 1772–1795.

Unit of administrative division and local government in Poland from the 14th century until the partitions of Poland in 1772–1795.

Łęczyca Voivodeship of the Polish–Lithuanian Commonwealth.
Łęczyca Voivodeship of the Polish–Lithuanian Commonwealth.

It was part of Province of Greater Poland, and its capital was in Łęczyca.