A report on Greater Poland

A map of Greater Poland/Great Poland during Piast period from the Codex diplomaticus Maioris Poloniae, based on data from historical documents
A map of Polish dialects. The area where Greater Poland's dialect is spoken is marked in violet.
Poznań Town Hall
Palace of the Raczyński family in Rogalin, within the Rogalin Landscape Park
Gniezno cathedral
Kalisz Town Hall
Leszno town hall
Marian sanctuary in Licheń near Konin

Historical region of west-central Poland.

- Greater Poland

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Konin

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City in central Poland, on the Warta River.

City in central Poland, on the Warta River.

The Stone Signpost of Konin is the oldest European signpost beyond the boundaries of the former Roman Empire
Gosławice district: Rural architecture, reflected in an open-air museum
Romanesque-Gothic St Bartholomew's Church
Mannerist tombstone of Grand Marshal of the Polish Crown Stanisław Przyjemski in the St. Bartholomew's Church
Warta-Gopło Canal
German soldiers executing Polish hostages in Konin in 1939
Konin Synagogue
Remains of Jewish tombstones
15th-century medieval castle in the Gosławice district
St. Bartholomew's Church
St. Andrew's Church
Monastery and St. Mary Magdalene's Church of Reformed Franciscans
Old Town Hall
Primary School No. 1
Rondo Hall Centre for Sport, in New Town
House of writer Zofia Urbanowska
House of 16th-century physician Jan Zemełka
Liberty Square (Plac Wolności)
Old cottage in Gosławice
A nook in the castle at Gosławice
City Hall
Former hotel, currently one of the city offices
Boulevard by the Warta River
1 Zamkowy Square
Romanesque cross on the north wall of St. Bartholomew's Church
Inscriptions carved by local figures through the ages, on the wall of St. Bartholomew's Church
No. 10 Wolności Square
No. 78 3 Maja Street
Interior of St. Adalbert's Church
Pipe organ of St. Bartholomew's Church
August Sunset, Konin 2008
Kasy Powiatowej House, on the Warta
Sikorski Building, Kilińskiego Street
Belfry of St. Bartholomew's Church
Belfry of St. Andrew's Church
Kolska Street gate of the Lutheran Cemetery
Hotel Pałacyk
A bridge on Józef Piłsudski Road
Europe's most modern coal powered plant (2008), in the Pątnów district
Park at the corner of 1 Maja and Dworcowa Streets
Former hospital in Kolska Street, now a secondary school
The Old Water Tower

(The name Stare Miasto first appeared in use later, after Konin had been reestablished elsewhere.) What remains from that time is SS Peter and Paul's Parish Church, with its magnificent carved portal and a solar clock on the south wall, perhaps the oldest solar clock in Greater Poland.

The Sieradz Voivodeship in
the Polish–Lithuanian Commonwealth in 1635.

Sieradz Voivodeship (1339–1793)

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Unit of administrative division and local government in the Kingdom of Poland and the Polish–Lithuanian Commonwealth, from 1339 to the second partition of Poland in 1793.

Unit of administrative division and local government in the Kingdom of Poland and the Polish–Lithuanian Commonwealth, from 1339 to the second partition of Poland in 1793.

The Sieradz Voivodeship in
the Polish–Lithuanian Commonwealth in 1635.
The Sieradz Voivodeship in
the Polish–Lithuanian Commonwealth in 1635.

It was a part of the Province of Greater Poland.

Pomerania

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Historical region on the southern shore of the Baltic Sea in Central Europe, split between Poland and Germany.

Historical region on the southern shore of the Baltic Sea in Central Europe, split between Poland and Germany.

Polish-defined Western Pomerania/German-defined Pomerania
17th-century map of the Duchy of Pomerania
Location of the Pomeranian Voivodeship within the Polish–Lithuanian Commonwealth
The Prussian Province of Pomerania within Prussia and the German Empire circa 1871.
Kashubians in regional dress
A map of Polish dialects. The Pomorze region contains the Kashubian language and a mix of Polish dialects from other parts of the country.
National Museum in Szczecin (Pałac Sejmu Stanów Pomorskich, Landeshaus)
Typical Pomeranian beach (West Pomeranian Voivodeship)
Wdzydze Lake (Pomeranian Voivodeship)
Wolin National Park (West Pomeranian Voivodeship)
Słowiński National Park (Pomeranian Voivodeship)
Usedom/Uznam (Western Pomerania)
Cape Arkona (Western Pomerania)
Szczecin
Stralsund
Gdańsk
Stralsund, one of several Hanseatic cities built in typical Brick Gothic style.
Ruins of Augustinians' cloister in Jasienica, Police.
Cathedral Basilica of the Assumption in Pelplin, one of the largest churches in Poland
Teutonic Knights' castle in Gniew, Pomerelia.

The West Pomeranian Voivodeship (Zachodniopomorskie) in Poland, stretching from the Oder–Neisse line to the Wieprza river, encompassing most of historical Pomerania in the narrow sense (as well as small parts of historic Greater Poland and Lubusz Land).

Crown of the Kingdom of Poland

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Common name for the historic Late Middle Ages territorial possessions of the King of Poland, including the Kingdom of Poland proper.

Common name for the historic Late Middle Ages territorial possessions of the King of Poland, including the Kingdom of Poland proper.

Crown of the Kingdom of Poland within Polish–Lithuanian Commonwealth in 1635.
Banner of the Kingdom of Poland until the 15th century
Banner of Poland and Lithuania in the Chronicle of the Council of Constance (1416)
First page of the original Constitution
Crown of the Kingdom of Poland, 1635
Voivodeships of the Commonwealth of the Two Nations
Map showing voivodeships of the Commonwealth of the Two Nations
The Crown and the Grand Duchy of Lithuania 1386–1434
The Spiš (Zips) region. Light blue and green areas show the pawned territories, red line shows current borders, yellow former border between then Hungary and Poland and the black borders between counties
High-level administrative map of Polish–Lithuanian Commonwealth and its fiefdoms in 1619 (superimposed on the modern map of Central and Eastern Europe).
The possessions of the Polish Crown
Grand Duchy of Lithuania.
Duchy of Prussia (semi-independent Polish fiefdom).
Duchy of Courland and Semigallia, Lithuanian fief.
Duchy of Livonia.

After the Union of Lublin (1569) Crown lands were divided into two provinces: Lesser Poland (Polish: Małopolska) and Greater Poland (Polish: Wielkopolska).

Provincial divisions of the Polish–Lithuanian Commonwealth.

Subdivisions of the Polish–Lithuanian Commonwealth

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Subdivisions of the Polish–Lithuanian Commonwealth evolved over for centuries of its existence from the signing of the Union of Lublin to the third partition.

Subdivisions of the Polish–Lithuanian Commonwealth evolved over for centuries of its existence from the signing of the Union of Lublin to the third partition.

Provincial divisions of the Polish–Lithuanian Commonwealth.

The Crown in turn comprised two "prowincjas": Greater Poland and Lesser Poland.

Entrance of Jan Henryk Dąbrowski to Poznań painted by Jan Gładysz

Greater Poland uprising (1806)

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Entrance of Jan Henryk Dąbrowski to Poznań painted by Jan Gładysz

Greater Poland uprising of 1806 was a Polish military insurrection which occurred in the region of Wielkopolska, also known as Greater Poland, against the occupying Prussian forces after the Partitions of the Polish–Lithuanian Commonwealth (1772–1795).

Poland subdivided into five provinces among the sons of Bolesław

Testament of Bolesław III Wrymouth

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The last will and testament of the Piast duke Bolesław III Wrymouth of Poland, established rules for governance of the Polish kingdom by his four surviving sons after his death.

The last will and testament of the Piast duke Bolesław III Wrymouth of Poland, established rules for governance of the Polish kingdom by his four surviving sons after his death.

Poland subdivided into five provinces among the sons of Bolesław
Fragmentation of Poland between the sons of Bolesław III in 1138:
Seniorate Province of Władysław II.
Silesian Province of Władysław II.
Masovian Province of Bolesław IV.
Greater Poland Province of Mieszko III.
Sandomierz Province of Henry. 
Łęczyca Province of Salomea of Berg.
Pomeranian vassals under the rule of Władysław II.

the Seniorate Province (or Duchy of Kraków), composed of western Lesser Poland, the eastern parts of Greater Poland, western Kuyavia and the lands of Sieradz, assigned to Bolesław's eldest son and future High Duke Władysław II, as well as the lands of Łęczyca which were held by Bolesław's widow Salomea of Berg for life and to revert to the Seniorate Province upon her death;

Seal of King Władysław

Władysław I Łokietek

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Władysław I Łokietek, in English known as the "Elbow-high" or Ladislaus the Short (c.

Władysław I Łokietek, in English known as the "Elbow-high" or Ladislaus the Short (c.

Seal of King Władysław
Edict by Władysław the Short in 1325 confirming the Cistercians of Byszewo continue to have the same rights as under German law, and the continued ownership of their Abbey in Byszewo.
Sulejów Abbey is the place where the decision was made to send a letter to the Pope asking for the coronation of Władysław
King Władysław the Elbow-high breaking off agreements with the Teutonic Knights at Brześć Kujawski, a painting by Jan Matejko in the National Museum in Warsaw
Władysław I Łokietek, by Jan Matejko
Royal seal of Władysław the Elbow-high
The so-called Crown of Bolesław the Brave was made for Władysław I.<ref>Rożek Michał, Polskie koronacje i korony, Kraków 1987. {{ISBN|83-03-01914-7}}</ref>
In 1320 the King began the building of a new Wawel Cathedral.<ref>Kraków, Małgorzta Woszczenko</ref>
Portrait of King Władysław I by Aleksander Lesser
The tomb of the monarch inside the Wawel Cathedral
Poland between 1275 and 1300.
Władysław I on White Horse by M. Barwicki.

He temporarily took control of part of Greater Poland after the death of his ally Przemysł II, lost it, and then subsequently regained it.

Ostrów Wielkopolski

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City in west-central Poland with 71 560 inhabitants (2020), situated in the Greater Poland Voivodeship; the seat of Ostrów Wielkopolski County.

City in west-central Poland with 71 560 inhabitants (2020), situated in the Greater Poland Voivodeship; the seat of Ostrów Wielkopolski County.

Partyzancka Street in Ostrów Wielkopolski
Marshall Józef Piłsudski during his visit in Ostrów in 1919
Memorial plaque at the former German labor camp which existed during the occupation of Poland
Polish Army Barracks in 1971
Speedway match between KM Ostrów Wielkopolski and Śląsk Świętochłowice in Ostrów in the 1980s
Memorial plaque to Krzysztof Komeda
City hall at the Market Square
Ostrów Wielkopolski Co-Cathedral
Virgin Mary Queen of Poland church
I Liceum Ogólnokształcące
Main Post Office
Facades of old townhouses in the city center
Old Cemetery
Graves of participants of the Greater Poland Uprising
Monument of Mieczysław Halka-Ledóchowski
Elementary School No. 2
Former synagogue
Park Miejski

In 1845 the Royal Catholic Gymnasium was established, a significant Polish school in the Prussian Partition of Poland, which as the I Liceum Ogólnokształcące remains one of the most renowned high schools in Greater Poland.

Polish–Lithuanian Commonwealth

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Country and a federation of Poland and Lithuania ruled by a common monarch in real union, who was both King of Poland and Grand Duke of Lithuania.

Country and a federation of Poland and Lithuania ruled by a common monarch in real union, who was both King of Poland and Grand Duke of Lithuania.

The Polish–Lithuanian Commonwealth (green) with vassal states (light green) at their peak in 1619
The Kingdom of Poland and the Grand Duchy of Lithuania in 1526.
The Polish–Lithuanian Commonwealth (green) with vassal states (light green) at their peak in 1619
The Union of Lublin joined the Kingdom of Poland and the Grand Duchy of Lithuania in 1569.
The Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth at its greatest extent in 1619.
Sigismund III Vasa was a religious zealot and an enlightened despot who presided over an era of prosperity and achievement. His reign also marked the Commonwealth's largest territorial expansion.
Sejm of the Polish–Lithuanian Commonwealth (parliment) in the early 17th century
John III Sobieski, victor over the Ottoman Turks at the Battle of Vienna in 1683.
Augustus II the Strong, King of Poland and Elector of Saxony, wearing the Order of the White Eagle which he established in 1705.
Partitions of Poland in 1772, 1793 and 1795.
Royal Castle in Warsaw was the formal residence of Polish kings after the capital was moved from Kraków in 1596
Crown Tribunal in Lublin was the highest court of appeals in the Kingdom of Poland
Palace of the Lithuanian Tribunal in Vilnius, which exclusively was the highest appeal court for the Lithuanian nobility in the Grand Duchy of Lithuania
The Republic at the Zenith of Its Power, the Royal Election of 1573
The Constitution of 3 May adopted in 1791 was the first modern constitution in Europe.
Cereals exports in the years 1619–1799. Agriculture, once extremely profitable to the nobility, became much less so after the mid-17th century.
A historical re-enactor dressed in the Polish Winged Hussars armour
Multi-stage rocket from Artis Magnæ Artilleriæ pars prima by Kazimierz Siemienowicz
Krasiczyn Castle was built between 1580-1631 in the mannerist style.
Wilanów Palace, completed in 1696, exemplifies the opulence of royal and noble residences in the Commonwealth.
Nieborów Palace designed by Dutch architect Tylman van Gameren and built in 1697
Social strata in the Commonwealth's society in 1655. From left: Jew, barber surgeon, painter, butcher, musician, tailor, barmaid, pharmacist, shoemaker, goldsmith, merchant and Armenian
Population density of the Commonwealth per each voivodeship in 1650
Saints Peter and Paul Church in Kraków was built between 1597-1619 by the Jesuit order
Original act of the Warsaw Confederation in 1573, the first act of religious freedom in Europe
First anniversary anthem of the Constitution of 3 May 1791 (1792) in Hebrew, Polish, German and French
Topographical map of the Commonwealth in 1764
Statuta Regni Poloniae in ordinem alphabeti digesta (Statutes of the Polish Kingdom, Arranged in Alphabetical Order), 1563
Grand Marshal of the Crown Łukasz Opaliński portraited with the insignium of his power in the parliament - the Marshal's cane, 1640
Rococo iconostasis in the Orthodox Church of the Holy Spirit in Vilnius, designed by Johann Christoph Glaubitz, 1753–1756
18th century amber casket. Gdańsk patronized by the Polish court flourished as the center for amber working in the 17th century.<ref name="gordon_campbell">{{cite book |author=Gordon Campbell |title=The Grove encyclopedia of decorative arts |year=2006 |page=13 |publisher=Oxford University Press US |isbn=01-95189-48-5}}</ref>
Stanisław Poniatowski, Commander of the Royal Guards and Grand Treasurer. Painted by Angelika Kauffmann in 1786.
Equestrian portrait of King Sigismund III of Poland, by Peter Paul Rubens, 1624
Tapestry with the arms of Michał Kazimierz Pac, Jan Leyniers, Brussels, 1667–1669
Silver tankard by Józef Ceypler, Kraków, 1739–1745
Example of the merchant architecture: Konopnica's tenement house in Lublin, 1575
Hussars' armours, first half of the 17th century
De republica emendanda (1554) by Andrzej Frycz Modrzewski, proposed a deep programme of reforms of the state, society and church.
Merkuriusz Polski Ordynaryjny, the first Polish newspaper published on the orders of Queen Marie Louise Gonzaga in 1661
Title page of Treny (1580) by Jan Kochanowski, a series of elegies upon the death of his beloved daughter, is an acknowledged masterpiece.
A plate from Michał Boym's Flora Sinensis (1656), the first description of an ecosystem of the Far East published in Europe<ref>{{cite book |author1=Gwei-Djen Lu |author2=Joseph Needham |author3=Vivienne Lo |title=Celestial lancets: a history and rationale of acupuncture and moxa |year=2002 |page=284 |publisher=Routledge |isbn=07-00714-58-8}}</ref>
Taurus Poniatovii, constellation originated by Marcin Poczobutt in 1777 to honor the king Stanisław II Augustus<ref>{{cite web |author=Ian Ridpath |url=http://www.ianridpath.com/startales/poniatowski.htm |title=Taurus Poniatovii - Poniatowski's bull |work=www.ianridpath.com |access-date=2009-05-18}}</ref>
Branicki Palace in Białystok, designed by Tylman van Gameren, is sometimes referred to as the "Polish Versailles."
Pažaislis Monastery in Kaunas, Pietro Puttini, built 1674–1712
Zamość City Hall, designed by Bernardo Morando, is a unique example of Renaissance architecture in Europe, consistently built in accordance with the Italian theories of an "ideal town."<ref name="unesco.org">{{cite web |url=http://whc.unesco.org/en/list/564 |title=Old City of Zamość |publisher=UNESCO World Heritage Centre |date=2009-09-23 |access-date=2011-09-15}}</ref>
Plafond Allegory of Spring, Jerzy Siemiginowski, 1680s, Wilanów Palace
Łańcut Synagogue was established by Stanisław Lubomirski, 1733.<ref>After a fire had destroyed a wooden synagogue in 1733 Stanislaw Lubomirski decided to found a new bricked synagogue building. {{cite web |author=Polin Travel |url=http://www.jewish-guide.pl/sites/lancut |title=Lancut |work=www.jewish-guide.pl|access-date=2010-09-02}}</ref>
Saints Peter and Paul Church in Kraków was built between 1597-1619 by the Jesuit order
Church of St. Peter and St. Paul in Vilnius, Pietro Puttini, built 1675-1704

The land routes, mostly to the German provinces of the Holy Roman Empire such as the cities of Leipzig and Nuremberg, were used for the export of live cattle (herds of around 50,000 head) hides, salt, tobacco, hemp and cotton from the Greater Poland region.