A report on Greater Poland

A map of Greater Poland/Great Poland during Piast period from the Codex diplomaticus Maioris Poloniae, based on data from historical documents
A map of Polish dialects. The area where Greater Poland's dialect is spoken is marked in violet.
Poznań Town Hall
Palace of the Raczyński family in Rogalin, within the Rogalin Landscape Park
Gniezno cathedral
Kalisz Town Hall
Leszno town hall
Marian sanctuary in Licheń near Konin

Historical region of west-central Poland.

- Greater Poland

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Duchy of Warsaw

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Polish client state of the French Empire established by Napoleon Bonaparte in 1807, during the Napoleonic Wars.

Polish client state of the French Empire established by Napoleon Bonaparte in 1807, during the Napoleonic Wars.

The Duchy of Warsaw in 1812
Prince Józef Poniatowski, Commander in Chief of the Army of the Duchy of Warsaw, by Josef Grassi
The Duchy of Warsaw in 1812
Polish uhlans from the Army of the Duchy of Warsaw, 1807–1815. Painting by January Suchodolski
Map of the Duchy of Warsaw, 1807–1809
Map of the Duchy of Warsaw, 1809–1815
Napoleon conferring the Constitution in 1807

The Kulmerland and Gdansk (Danzig) became part of the Province of West Prussia; the remaining territories (i.e., Greater Poland/Poznań), which covered an area of approximately 29000 km2, were reconstituted into the Grand Duchy of Posen.

Map of the National Park

Wielkopolski National Park

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Map of the National Park

Wielkopolski National Park (Wielkopolski Park Narodowy, or the National Park of Greater Poland) is a National Park within the Wielkopolska (Greater Poland) region of west-central Poland, approximately 15 km south of the regional capital, Poznań.

12th-century fresco depiction in the Znojmo Rotunda

Bretislav I

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Duke of Bohemia from 1034 until his death.

Duke of Bohemia from 1034 until his death.

12th-century fresco depiction in the Znojmo Rotunda
Bretislav kidnapping his future wife Judith of Schweinfurt from a monastery, from the Chronicle of Dalimil

In 1039, he invaded Lesser and Greater Poland, captured Poznań, sacked Gniezno, and brought the relics of St. Adalbert, Radim Gaudentius and the Five Brothers back with him.

Black Reichswehr fighting Polish forces during the Poland Uprising 1919

Greater Poland uprising (1918–1919)

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Black Reichswehr fighting Polish forces during the Poland Uprising 1919
Map of the historic region of Greater Poland—the region's borders are outlined in red
Soldiers and workers assembling to elect a council in Poznań, 10 November 1918
Polish soldiers in trenches on the Polish-German front, January 1919
Soldiers of the Greater Poland Army during the winter of 1919/20
Map of the Prussian province of Posen—Polish-speaking areas are shown in yellow
Monument commemorating Polish soldiers who fought in the Greater Poland Uprising of 1919
Butteroffensive
Military Demarcation line (green), Final border (red)
Monument to the Greater Poland Uprising and its soldiers in Pobiedziska

The Greater Poland uprising of 1918–1919, or Wielkopolska uprising of 1918–1919 (powstanie wielkopolskie 1918–1919 roku; Großpolnischer Aufstand) or Posnanian War was a military insurrection of Poles in the Greater Poland region (German: Grand Duchy of Posen or Provinz Posen) against German rule.

Poland in 1138: Seniorate Province (with Pomerelia) in red, Silesia in blue

Władysław II the Exile

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The high duke of Poland and duke of Silesia from 1138 until his expulsion in 1146.

The high duke of Poland and duke of Silesia from 1138 until his expulsion in 1146.

Poland in 1138: Seniorate Province (with Pomerelia) in red, Silesia in blue
Altenburg Castle

In addition to Silesia, he received the central Seniorate Province, stretching from Lesser Poland at Kraków to eastern Greater Poland and western Kuyavia, as well as the authority over the Pomerelian lands at Gdańsk on the Baltic Sea.

Warta

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The river Warta (, ; Warthe ; Varta) rises in central Poland and meanders greatly north-west to flow into the Oder, against the German border.

The river Warta (, ; Warthe ; Varta) rises in central Poland and meanders greatly north-west to flow into the Oder, against the German border.

Warta River in Gorzów Wielkopolski
Warta River near Kostrzyn

The Warta rises in the Kraków-Częstochowa Upland at Kromołów in Zawiercie, Silesian Voivodeship, flows through Łódź Land, Greater Poland and Lubusz Land, where it empties into the Oder near Kostrzyn at the border with Germany.

Netze District in 1786

Netze District

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Territory in the Kingdom of Prussia from 1772 until 1807.

Territory in the Kingdom of Prussia from 1772 until 1807.

Netze District in 1786

Beside Royal Prussia, a land of the Polish Crown since 1466, King Frederick II of Prussia also seized the adjacent lands of the Prowincja of Greater Poland to the south from the Polish–Lithuanian Commonwealth in the First Partition of Poland of 1772.

Battle at Miłosław, 1868 painting by Juliusz Kossak.

Greater Poland uprising (1848)

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Unsuccessful military insurrection of Poles against Prussian forces, during the Spring of Nations period.

Unsuccessful military insurrection of Poles against Prussian forces, during the Spring of Nations period.

Battle at Miłosław, 1868 painting by Juliusz Kossak.
Ludwik Mierosławski
Karl Wilhelm von Willisen
Funeral services held in Posen for commemoration of the fallen (J. Zajączkowski)

While the main fighting was concentrated in the Greater Poland region, fights also occurred in other part of the Prussian Partition of Poland, and protests were held in Polish inhabited regions of Silesia.

Casimir I the Restorer

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The duke of Poland from 1040 until his death.

The duke of Poland from 1040 until his death.

The central district of Greater Poland (Wielkopolska) revolted against the nobles and Catholic clergy en masse.

Map of Europe in 1848–1849 depicting the main revolutionary centers, important counter-revolutionary troop movements and states with abdications

Revolutions of 1848

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The Revolutions of 1848, known in some countries as the Springtime of the Peoples or the Springtime of Nations, were a series of political upheavals throughout Europe starting in 1848.

The Revolutions of 1848, known in some countries as the Springtime of the Peoples or the Springtime of Nations, were a series of political upheavals throughout Europe starting in 1848.

Map of Europe in 1848–1849 depicting the main revolutionary centers, important counter-revolutionary troop movements and states with abdications
Galician slaughter (Polish: Rzeź galicyjska) by Jan Lewicki (1795–1871), depicting the massacre of Polish nobles by Polish peasants in Galicia in 1846.
The June Uprising of 1848 in Prague injected a strong political element into Czech National Revival.
The revolutionary barricades in Vienna in May 1848
Episode from the Five Days of Milan, painting by Baldassare Verazzi
Revolutionaries in Berlin in March 1848, waving the revolutionary flags
Danish soldiers parade through Copenhagen in 1849 after victories in the First Schleswig War
Proclamation of the Serbian Vojvodina in May 1848 during the Serb Revolution
The Battle of Buda in May 1849 by Mór Than
Hungarian hussars in battle during the Hungarian Revolution
Romanian revolutionaries in Bucharest in 1848, carrying the Romanian tricolor
A depiction of Leopold I of Belgium's symbolic offer to resign the crown in 1848
Trial of the Irish patriots at Clonmel. Young Irelanders receiving their sentence of death.
Illustration of the "March troubles" in Stockholm, Sweden in 1848
Chartist meeting on Kennington Common 10 April 1848
A caricature by Ferdinand Schröder on the defeat of the revolutions of 1848–1849 in Europe (published in Düsseldorfer Monatshefte, August 1849)
Louis Blenker [Germany]
Alexander Schimmelfennig (Germany)
Carl Schurz (Germany)
Franz Sigel (Germany)
August Willich (Germany)
Alexander Asboth (Hungary)
Lajos Kossuth (Hungary)
Albin Francisco Schoepf (Hungary)
Julius Stahel (Hungary)
Charles Zagonyi (Hungary)
Thomas Francis Meagher (Ireland)
Włodzimierz Krzyżanowski (Poland)

Additionally, an uprising by democratic forces against Prussia, planned but not actually carried out, occurred in Greater Poland.