A report on Greater Poland

A map of Greater Poland/Great Poland during Piast period from the Codex diplomaticus Maioris Poloniae, based on data from historical documents
A map of Polish dialects. The area where Greater Poland's dialect is spoken is marked in violet.
Poznań Town Hall
Palace of the Raczyński family in Rogalin, within the Rogalin Landscape Park
Gniezno cathedral
Kalisz Town Hall
Leszno town hall
Marian sanctuary in Licheń near Konin

Historical region of west-central Poland.

- Greater Poland

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Overall

Gniezno Voivodeship in
the Polish–Lithuanian Commonwealth in 1768.

Gniezno Voivodeship

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Unit of administrative division and local government in Poland for a short time from 1768, when it was cut from the Kalisz Voivodeship, to the Second Partition of Poland in 1793.

Unit of administrative division and local government in Poland for a short time from 1768, when it was cut from the Kalisz Voivodeship, to the Second Partition of Poland in 1793.

Gniezno Voivodeship in
the Polish–Lithuanian Commonwealth in 1768.
Gniezno Voivodeship in
the Polish–Lithuanian Commonwealth in 1768.

It was part of Greater Polish prowincja.

Józef Niemojewski, leader of the uprising

Greater Poland uprising (1794)

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Józef Niemojewski, leader of the uprising
General Jan Henryk Dąbrowski, one of the leaders of the uprising

The 1794 Greater Poland uprising (Polish: Powstanie Wielkopolskie 1794 roku) was a military insurrection by Poles in Wielkopolska (Greater Poland) against Kingdom of Prussia which had taken possession of this territory after the 1793 Second Partition of the Polish–Lithuanian Commonwealth.

Greater Poland uprising (1846)

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The 1846 Wielkopolska uprising (powstanie wielkopolskie 1846 roku) was a planned military insurrection by Poles in the land of Greater Poland against the Prussian forces, designed to be part of a general Polish uprising in all three partitions of Poland, against the Russians, Austrians and Prussians.

South Prussia 1795–1806

South Prussia

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Province of the Kingdom of Prussia from 1793 to 1807.

Province of the Kingdom of Prussia from 1793 to 1807.

South Prussia 1795–1806
Map South Prussia (Südpreussen) and the Departments of Posen, Kalisch, and Warschau, 1801-1807

the Poznań, Kalisz and Gniezno Voivodeships of Greater Poland;

The national boundaries within Europe set by the Congress of Vienna

Congress of Vienna

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International diplomatic conference to reconstitute the European political order after the downfall of the French Emperor Napoleon Bonaparte.

International diplomatic conference to reconstitute the European political order after the downfall of the French Emperor Napoleon Bonaparte.

The national boundaries within Europe set by the Congress of Vienna
Frontispiece of the Acts of the Congress of Vienna
1. Arthur Wellesley, 1st Duke of Wellington
 2. Joaquim Lobo Silveira, 7th Count of Oriola
 3.  António de Saldanha da Gama, Count of Porto Santo
 4. 🇸🇪 Count Carl Löwenhielm
 5.  Louis Joseph Alexis, Comte de Noailles
 6.  Klemens Wenzel, Prince von Metternich
 7.  André Dupin
 8.  Count Karl Robert Nesselrode
 9.  Pedro de Sousa Holstein, 1st Count of Palmela
 10.  Robert Stewart, Viscount Castlereagh
 11.  Emmerich Joseph, Duke of Dalberg
 12.  Baron Johann von Wessenberg
 13.  Prince Andrey Kirillovich Razumovsky
 14.  Charles Stewart, 1st Baron Stewart
 15. 🇪🇸 Pedro Gómez Labrador, 1st Marquess of Labrador
 16.  Richard Le Poer Trench, 2nd Earl of Clancarty
 17. Clear.gif  (Recorder)
 18.  Friedrich von Gentz (Congress Secretary)
 19.  Baron Wilhelm von Humboldt
 20.  William Cathcart, 1st Earl Cathcart
 21.  Prince Karl August von Hardenberg
 22.  Charles Maurice de Talleyrand-Périgord
 23.  Count Gustav Ernst von Stackelberg
Talleyrand proved an able negotiator for the defeated French.
In pink: territories left to France in 1814, but removed after the Treaty of Paris
Italian states after the Congress of Vienna with Austrian-annexed territories shown in yellow
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Russia, however, did not receive the majority of Greater Poland and Kuyavia nor the Chełmno Land, which were given to Prussia and mostly included within the newly formed Grand Duchy of Posen (Poznań), nor Kraków, which officially became a free city, but in fact was a shared protectorate of Austria, Prussia and Russia.

Posen-West Prussia

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Province of Prussia from 1922 to 1938.

Province of Prussia from 1922 to 1938.

Posen-West Prussia (red) within the Free State of Prussia (light beige).
1905 map of the Province of Posen. Polish-speaking areas shown in yellow.
Posen-West Prussia (red) within the Free State of Prussia (light beige).
Coat of arms of Posen-West Prussia since 1929
Districts of Posen-West Prussia, 1922–1938.
The former Oberpräsidium at Schneidemühl.
A map of West Prussia and the Netze District c. 1786. Part of the later border of South Prussia is also shown.

Until the late 18th century partitions of Poland, the lands which made up Posen-West Prussia had been part of the Greater Poland and East Pomeranian (Pomerelian) regions of the Polish–Lithuanian Commonwealth and were administratively parts of the Poznań, Gniezno (Kalisz before 1768) and Pomeranian Voivodeships.

Karol Marconi, Statute of Wiślica being granted by Casimir the Great

Statutes of Casimir the Great

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Statutes of Casimir the Great or Piotrków-Wiślica Statutes (Statuty wiślicko-piotrkowskie) - a collection of laws issued by Casimir III the Great, the king of Poland, in the years 1346-1362 during congresses in Piotrków and Wiślica.

Statutes of Casimir the Great or Piotrków-Wiślica Statutes (Statuty wiślicko-piotrkowskie) - a collection of laws issued by Casimir III the Great, the king of Poland, in the years 1346-1362 during congresses in Piotrków and Wiślica.

Karol Marconi, Statute of Wiślica being granted by Casimir the Great

The Piotrków statute regulated the law in Greater Poland (Wielkopolska), and the Wiślica statute in Lesser Poland (Małopolska).

Kościuszko Uprising 1794

Kościuszko Uprising

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Uprising against the Russian Empire and the Kingdom of Prussia led by Tadeusz Kościuszko in the Polish–Lithuanian Commonwealth and the Prussian partition in 1794.

Uprising against the Russian Empire and the Kingdom of Prussia led by Tadeusz Kościuszko in the Polish–Lithuanian Commonwealth and the Prussian partition in 1794.

Kościuszko Uprising 1794
Tadeusz Kościuszko taking the oath, 24th March 1794
"Battle of Racławice", Jan Matejko, oil on canvas, 1888, National Museum in Kraków. 4 April 1794
Battle of Szczekociny, 1794 by Michał Stachowicz
Hanging traitors in effigie, painting by Jean Pierre Norblin de la Gourdaine
Kościuszko at Maciejowice 1794, by Jan Bogumił Plersch. Kościuszko was wounded and taken captive.
Polish soldiers of the Uprising
Act of Kościuszko Uprising, 24 March 1794
Flag of Polish peasant soldiers in Kraków with the words "They feed and defend"
Polish Grenadiers in peasant costumes, Kraków 1794

On 20 August, an uprising in Greater Poland started and the Prussians were forced to withdraw their forces from Warsaw.

Experimental gas chamber at Bunker No. 17

Fort VII

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Nazi German death camp set up in Poznań in German-occupied Poland during World War II, located in one of the 19th-century forts circling the city.

Nazi German death camp set up in Poznań in German-occupied Poland during World War II, located in one of the 19th-century forts circling the city.

Experimental gas chamber at Bunker No. 17
View of the main entrance
The "stairway of death"

The prisoners were mostly Poles from the Wielkopolska region.

Former seat of the Prussian Settlement Commission, now Poznań University's Collegium Maius

Prussian Settlement Commission

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Prussian government commission that operated between 1886 and 1924, but actively only until 1918.

Prussian government commission that operated between 1886 and 1924, but actively only until 1918.

Former seat of the Prussian Settlement Commission, now Poznań University's Collegium Maius
Acquisitions of the Prussian Settlement Commission

Germans from West Prussia and Greater Poland region who took part in the settlement process declined over time, while the number of Germans from the Russian Empire increased.