A report on Green Mountains

Green Mountains looking south from Jay Peak
Jay Peak, located at the northern end of the Green Mountains in Vermont
Green Mountains outside of Montpelier, Vermont
Map of the main regions of the northern Appalachians

The Green Mountains are a mountain range in the U.S. state of Vermont.

- Green Mountains
Green Mountains looking south from Jay Peak

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Vermont

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State in the New England region of the United States.

State in the New England region of the United States.

The Old Constitution House at Windsor, where the Constitution of Vermont was adopted on July 8, 1777
A circa 1775 flag used by the Green Mountain Boys
The gold leaf dome of the neoclassical Vermont State House (Capitol) in Montpelier
1791 Act of Congress admitting Vermont into the Union
Vermont in 1827. The county boundaries have since changed.
Map of Vermont showing cities, roads, and rivers
Population density of Vermont
Mount Mansfield
Western face of Camel's Hump Mountain (elevation 4079 ft).
Fall foliage at Lake Willoughby
Köppen climate types of Vermont, using 1991–2020 climate normals.
Silurian and Devonian stratigraphy of Vermont
The hermit thrush, the state bird of Vermont
A proportional representation of Vermont exports, 2020
Fall foliage seen from Hogback Mountain, Wilmington
Lake Champlain
Autumn in Vermont
Stowe Resort Village
The Lyndon Institute, a high school in Lyndon, Vermont
The University of Vermont
Old Mill, the oldest building of the university
Vermont welcome sign in Addison on Route 17 just over the New York border over the Champlain Bridge
Amtrak station in White River Junction
The Vermont Yankee Nuclear Power Plant, in Vernon
The Vermont Supreme Court's building in Montpelier
Vermont towns hold a March town meeting for voters to approve the town's budget and decide other matters. Marlboro voters meet in this building.
Senators Bernie Sanders and Patrick Leahy and Representative Peter Welch greet supporters in 2017.
Vermontasaurus sculpture in Post Mills, in 2010

The geography of the state is marked by the Green Mountains, which run north–south up the middle of the state, separating Lake Champlain and other valley terrain on the west from the Connecticut River valley that defines much of its eastern border.

Section of the Long Trail

Long Trail

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Hiking trail located in Vermont, running the length of the state.

Hiking trail located in Vermont, running the length of the state.

Section of the Long Trail
Baker Peak in the White Rocks National Recreation Area
Little Rock Pond from the Long Trail
View of Mount Mansfield from the Long Trail

It runs along the main ridge of the Green Mountains, coinciding with the Appalachian Trail (for which it served as the inspiration) for roughly 100 mi in the southern third of the state.

Mount Greylock with its glacial cirque, the Hopper, is geologically part of the Taconic Mountain Range although culturally associated with the Berkshires

Taconic Mountains

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The Taconic Mountains or Taconic Range are a range of the Appalachian Mountains, running along the eastern border of New York State and adjacent New England from northwest Connecticut to western Massachusetts, north to central western Vermont.

The Taconic Mountains or Taconic Range are a range of the Appalachian Mountains, running along the eastern border of New York State and adjacent New England from northwest Connecticut to western Massachusetts, north to central western Vermont.

Mount Greylock with its glacial cirque, the Hopper, is geologically part of the Taconic Mountain Range although culturally associated with the Berkshires
Misery Mountain (left) and Berlin Mountain (right) seen from the east in South Williamstown, MA

The Berkshires and the Green Mountains rise to the east of the Taconics.

Marker on the trail near Sugarloaf Mountain in Maine commemorating its completion.

Appalachian Trail

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Hiking trail in the Eastern United States, extending almost 2,200 miles between Springer Mountain in Georgia and Mount Katahdin in Maine, and passing through 14 states.

Hiking trail in the Eastern United States, extending almost 2,200 miles between Springer Mountain in Georgia and Mount Katahdin in Maine, and passing through 14 states.

Marker on the trail near Sugarloaf Mountain in Maine commemorating its completion.
Diagram of the Appalachian Mountain system
Camping regulations in the Delaware Water Gap National Recreation Area of New Jersey
AT information center in Boiling Springs, Pennsylvania
AT crossing sign on New Hampshire State Route 112
Map of the Appalachian Trail
Original 1930 ATC copper marker from a tree in New Jersey
An old metal diamond marker beside the trail in Maine
A typical white AT blaze along the trail in Pennsylvania
A blue side-trail blaze, on Mount Greylock in Massachusetts
A hiker signs the register on Springer Mountain, Ga., southern terminus of the trail.
Appalachian Trail at Newfound Gap in the Great Smoky Mountains National Park, N.C.
Wheelchair accessible portion of the trail on Cross Mountain, near Shady Valley, Tennessee
The Pocosin cabin along the trail in Shenandoah National Park, Virginia
Crossing the Potomac River at Harpers Ferry, West Virginia, "psychological midpoint" of the trail
Annapolis Rock Overlook, along the trail in South Mountain State Park, Maryland
Pedestrian bridge over US Highway 11 in Middlesex Township, Pennsylvania
Bear Mountain Bridge, New York
Housatonic River's Great Falls in Falls Village, Connecticut as viewed from the Appalachian Trail.
View from Mount Greylock in Massachusetts
Franconia Ridge, a section of the Appalachian Trail in New Hampshire
Northern terminus of the trail atop Mount Katahdin in Maine
Stone marker at Dicks Creek (Chestatee River tributary) on the Appalachian Trail in Georgia

It follows the ridge of the southern Green Mountains, summitting such notable peaks as Stratton Mountain, Glastenbury Mountain, and Killington Peak.

Detail of Diego Gutiérrez's 1562 map of the Western Hemisphere, showing the first known use of a variation of the place name "Appalachia" ("Apalchen") – from the map Americae sive qvartae orbis partis nova et exactissima descriptio

Appalachian Mountains

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The Appalachian Mountains, often called the Appalachians, are a system of mountains in eastern to northeastern North America.

The Appalachian Mountains, often called the Appalachians, are a system of mountains in eastern to northeastern North America.

Detail of Diego Gutiérrez's 1562 map of the Western Hemisphere, showing the first known use of a variation of the place name "Appalachia" ("Apalchen") – from the map Americae sive qvartae orbis partis nova et exactissima descriptio
Blue Ridge Mountains in Virginia
Bald Mountains seen from Tennessee
Shaded relief map of the Cumberland Plateau and Ridge-and-Valley Appalachians on the Virginia–West Virginia border
Old fault exposed by roadcut near Hazleton, Pennsylvania, along Interstate 81, such faults are common in the folded Appalachians
Cliffs overlooking the New River near Gauley Bridge, West Virginia
Paleogeographic reconstruction showing the Appalachian Basin area during the Middle Devonian period
USGS Appalachian zones in the United States
View from Mount Mitchell, North Carolina, at 6684 ft the highest peak east of the Mississippi River
Shenandoah National Park in Virginia
The view from Craggy Gardens on the Blue Ridge Parkway in North Carolina
Great laurel thicket in the Pisgah National Forest, North Carolina
Cranberry Glades, a bog preserve in West Virginia
Grassy balds on the Roan Highlands straddling the North Carolina/Tennessee border
Alpine tundra on Mount Washington, high point of the White Mountains of New Hampshire
Southern flying squirrel
Male eastern wild turkey

Northern: The northern section runs from the Canadian province of Newfoundland and Labrador to the Hudson River. It includes the Long Range Mountains and Annieopsquotch Mountains on the island of Newfoundland, the French Territorial Collectivity of Saint-Pierre and Miquelon, SW of Newfoundland, Chic-Choc Mountains and Notre Dame Range in Quebec and New Brunswick, scattered elevations and small ranges elsewhere in Nova Scotia and New Brunswick, the Longfellow Mountains in Maine, the White Mountains in New Hampshire, the Green Mountains in Vermont, and The Berkshires in Massachusetts and Connecticut. The Metacomet Ridge Mountains in Connecticut and south-central Massachusetts, although contained within the Appalachian province, is a younger system and not geologically associated with the Appalachians. The Monteregian Hills, which cross the Green Mountains in Quebec, are also unassociated with the Appalachians.

The Berkshires region of Massachusetts, with Berkshire County in dark purple.

Berkshires

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The Berkshires are a highland geologic region located in the western parts of Massachusetts and northwest Connecticut.

The Berkshires are a highland geologic region located in the western parts of Massachusetts and northwest Connecticut.

The Berkshires region of Massachusetts, with Berkshire County in dark purple.
The Mount Greylock massif seen from the west in winter, with the deep valley known as "The Hopper" directly below the summit
A view of the Berkshires from near North Adams, Massachusetts

The term "Berkshires" is normally used by locals in reference to the portion of the Vermont-based Green Mountains that extend south into western Massachusetts; the portion extending further south into northwestern Connecticut is grouped with the Connecticut portion of the Taconic Mountains and referred to as either the Northwest Hills or Litchfield Hills.

Alpine tundra grasses at the summit of Camel's Hump, Vermont, June 2008.

Camel's Hump

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Alpine tundra grasses at the summit of Camel's Hump, Vermont, June 2008.
The Vermont state quarter depicts Camel's Hump and Maple trees with sap buckets
Summit marker on Camel's Hump. Notice the inscription reads "Camels Rump"
Western face of Camel's Hump Mountain from South Burlington, Vermont.
Southward view from the summit of Camel's Hump (with Mt. Ethan Allen in the immediate foreground), September 2017.
View east from old fire tower atop Poke-O-Moonshine Mountain in Chesterfield, NY: 2008
Painting of Camel's Hump by John Frederick Kensett, 1852, oil on canvas.
Eastern face of Camel's Hump taken in 1968
Postcard of eastern face of Camel's Hump
Postcard of western face of Camel's Hump
A view of Camel's Hump from the Allis Trail to the southeast

Camel's Hump (alternatively Camels Hump) is a mountain in the Green Mountains in the U.S. state of Vermont.

Killington Peak

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Killington Peak is the second highest summit in the Green Mountains and in the U.S. state of Vermont.

Mount Ellen (Vermont)

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Mount Ellen is a mountain in the Green Mountains in the U.S. state of Vermont.

Mount Abraham (Vermont)

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Mount Abraham (known as Mount Abe to locals) is a mountain in the Green Mountains in the U.S. state of Vermont.