Green Satin radar

Green Satin
Green Satin was a doppler radar system developed by the Royal Air Force as an air navigation aid.wikipedia
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List of Rainbow Codes

rainbow codeRainbow Codesrainbow codename
The name comes from an era when the Ministry of Supply used random combinations of colours and code words to prevent their code names being too literal.
Blue Silk - airborne Doppler navigation radar unit with lower speed range than Green Satin

Handley Page Victor

VictorHandley Page Victor K.2Victor K.2
It remained in use on the V-bombers until the Avro Vulcans and Handley Page Victors left service in 1993.
These included the H2S radar, developed from the first airborne ground-scanning radar, and the Green Satin radar.

Navigation and Bombing System

These values were then fed into the Navigation and Bombing System.
Inputs to the NBS system included late models of the H2S radar, the True Airspeed Unit, an astrocompass, the Green Satin radar, and a radio altimeter.

Doppler radar

DopplerDoppler navigationDoppler navigation radar
Green Satin was a doppler radar system developed by the Royal Air Force as an air navigation aid. The solution to measuring ground speed was already well understood at the time, using a doppler radar system to compare the returned frequency of two or more signals.
One early example of such a system was the Green Satin radar used in the English Electric Canberra.

V bomber

V-bomberV-ForceV Force
It was subsequently used on the V bomber fleet.
However, the Valiants were also equipped with Green Satin radar, which could still be used.

Mark XIV bomb sight

Mark XIV bombsightBlue Devilbombsight computer
These outputs also drove correction circuits in the H2S Mk. IX bombing radars and Mark XIV bomb sight to adjust the predicted bomb trajectories.
These were normally part of the Navigation and Bombing System, which combined inputs from aircraft instruments, H2S and Green Satin radars, star fixes and radio navigation systems.

Vickers Valiant

ValiantVickers Valiant BK.1Type 660
Problems locking on to a calm sea surface meant Decca navigational equipment had to be used instead during Grapple bomb aiming from Valiant aircraft.
A Smith Aerospace autopilot and instrument landing system (ILS) functionality was installed along with various navigational aids, such as the Marconi Company-built Green Satin doppler radar, Gee radio navigation, Automatic Direction Finder (ADF), VOR/Distance Measuring Equipment (DME), and radar altimeters.

H2S (radar)

H2SFishpondH2S radar
These outputs also drove correction circuits in the H2S Mk. IX bombing radars and Mark XIV bomb sight to adjust the predicted bomb trajectories.
During this period, the API was replaced by the more advanced Navigation and Bombing Computer (NBC), which, when combined with Mk. IX and Green Satin radar, formed the Navigation and Bombing System (NBS).

Royal Air Force

RAFairmanBritish
Green Satin was a doppler radar system developed by the Royal Air Force as an air navigation aid.

Air navigation

navigationnavigatoraerial navigation
Green Satin was a doppler radar system developed by the Royal Air Force as an air navigation aid.

English Electric Canberra

CanberraCanberrasCanberra bombers
It was originally specified in 1949 as OR.3015 for the English Electric Canberra bomber.

Avro Vulcan

VulcanVulcan bomberVulcan bombers
It remained in use on the V-bombers until the Avro Vulcans and Handley Page Victors left service in 1993.

Ministry of Supply

SupplyBritish Supply MissionMin. of Supply
The name comes from an era when the Ministry of Supply used random combinations of colours and code words to prevent their code names being too literal.

Code name

codenamecryptonymcodenamed
The name comes from an era when the Ministry of Supply used random combinations of colours and code words to prevent their code names being too literal.

Royal Navy (disambiguation)

Royal NavyRNBritish
A version known as Blue Silk with lower top-speed limits was used in some marks of Canberra and Royal Navy aircraft.

Euclidean vector

vectorvectorsvector addition
Using any four of these values and basic vector addition, the other values can be determined through the wind triangle.

Wind triangle

compensate for the winddriftdrift angle
Using any four of these values and basic vector addition, the other values can be determined through the wind triangle.

Dead reckoning

Dead-reckonedPedestrian Dead Reckoningdead-reckoning
Once determined, the path of the aircraft can be accurately calculated using dead reckoning in comparison to an original fixed point. For most of the history of air navigation, this was accomplished through a reverse dead reckoning process, timing the passage of objects on the ground to measure ground speed, and either estimating the drift or measuring it with simple optical instruments like the drift meter.

Airspeed indicator

airspeedair speed indicatorair speed
Airspeed and heading can be measured with a fair degree of accuracy using onboard measurements, namely the airspeed indicator and gyrocompass.

Gyrocompass

gyro compassgyroscopic compassgyro compasses
Airspeed and heading can be measured with a fair degree of accuracy using onboard measurements, namely the airspeed indicator and gyrocompass.

Drift meter

drift readings
For most of the history of air navigation, this was accomplished through a reverse dead reckoning process, timing the passage of objects on the ground to measure ground speed, and either estimating the drift or measuring it with simple optical instruments like the drift meter.

United States Navy

U.S. NavyNavyUS Navy
Both are inherently inaccurate, with the US Navy suggesting such measures are accurate to only 10%.

Gee (navigation)

GeeG-HGEE Mk3
In practice, Gee would be used to take a fix after the aircraft reached cruise altitude and speed, and would be used to fine-tune the navigation until it passed out of Gee range, perhaps 300 to 450 nautical miles.

Frequency

frequenciesperiodperiodic
The solution to measuring ground speed was already well understood at the time, using a doppler radar system to compare the returned frequency of two or more signals.

Comparator

voltage comparatorcomparatorsanalog comparator
Each pair of signals was sent into a separate frequency comparator, with the output being the difference in frequencies represented by a voltage.