Greenland Dock

Howland Great Wet DockHowland Great DockGreenland PassageHowland Dock
Greenland Dock is the oldest of London's riverside wet docks, located in Rotherhithe in the area of the city now known as Docklands.wikipedia
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Rotherhithe

Downtown, Rotherhitheie.'' RotherhitheRedriff
Greenland Dock is the oldest of London's riverside wet docks, located in Rotherhithe in the area of the city now known as Docklands.
The largest surviving dock on the south bank, Greenland Dock, is the focal point for the southern part of the district, while there are many preserved wharves along the riverside at the north end of Rotherhithe.

London Docklands

DocklandsLondon docksD3
Greenland Dock is the oldest of London's riverside wet docks, located in Rotherhithe in the area of the city now known as Docklands.
The Howland Great Dock in Rotherhithe (built in 1696, and later to form the core of the Surrey Commercial Docks) was designed to address these problems, providing a large, secure and sheltered anchorage with room for 120 large vessels.

Surrey Commercial Docks

Surrey DocksCommercial Dock Company Surrey Commercial Docks Company
It used to be part of the Surrey Commercial Docks, most of which have by now been filled in.
By the mid-18th century the dock had become a base for Arctic whalers and was renamed Greenland Dock.

Wriothesley Russell, 2nd Duke of Bedford

Wriothesley Russell2nd Duke of BedfordDuke of Bedford
The Russells had been given a portion of land in lower Rotherhithe by a wealthy Streatham landowner, John Howland, as part of a wedding dowry for his daughter Elizabeth, granddaughter of Sir Josiah Child – the dictatorial chairman of the East India Company, who married Wriothesley Russell, the Marquis of Tavistock.
Around 1698, he began the construction of the Howland Great Wet Dock on the Thames, on some of his wife's dowry lands in Rotherhithe.

Dock (maritime)

dockdockswet dock
Greenland Dock is the oldest of London's riverside wet docks, located in Rotherhithe in the area of the city now known as Docklands.

Grand Surrey Canal

Surrey CanalGrand Surreythe Grand Surrey Canal
More than doubling in length and nearly doubling in depth, in its final form, it covered an area of 22+1/2 acre, with a depth of 31 ft and a length of 2250 ft, which cut straight across the old Grand Surrey Canal.
The Grand Surrey Canal closed progressively from the 1940s, with all but the Greenland Dock closing in the 1970s.

Port of London

LondonPort of London AuthorityLondon Port
In 1909 the dock, along with all of the other London docks, was amalgamated into the Port of London under the management of the Port of London Authority.
These included West India Docks (1802), East India Docks (1803, originating from the Brunswick Dock of 1790), London Docks (1805), Surrey Commercial Docks (1807, originating from the Howland Great Wet Dock of 1696), St Katharine Docks (1828), Royal Victoria Dock (1855), Millwall Dock (1868), Royal Albert Dock (1880), and Tilbury docks (1886).

John Wolfe Barry

John Wolfe-BarrySir John Wolfe BarrySir John Wolfe-Barry
Between 1895 and 1904 Greenland Dock was greatly expanded by being extended at a cost of £940,000 to the west in a project carried out under Sir John Wolfe-Barry, the engineer who built Tower Bridge.

South Dock, Rotherhithe

South DockSouth Dock Marina
It still has a working connection to South Dock, which is now a marina, and it has a small marina of its own at its eastern end.
It was built in 1807–1811 just south of the larger Greenland Dock, to which it is connected by a channel now known as Greenland Cut; it also has a lock giving access to the River Thames.

London Borough of Southwark

SouthwarkSouthwark CouncilBorough of Southwark
Greenland Dock was sold to Southwark council.
Some of the old industrial and wharfside heritage remains at the now defunct Surrey Commercial Docks now Surrey Quays, including Greenland Dock and Baltic Quay, where major residential schemes were developed in the 1980s and 1990s.

Inner London Education Authority

ILEAInner LondonInner London Education Authority,
During this period the Inner London Education Authority ran a Surrey Docks Watersports Centre on the dock from a series of portable cabins at the Redriff Road end of the dock.
The ILEA also ran a watersports centre at Greenland Dock in Bermondsey, and the Centre For Life Studies, a training centre for biologists in secondary education, at London Zoo.

New Caledonian Wharf

Today the area is dominated by luxury residential developments, such as the Greenland Passage development and the gated New Caledonian Wharf.
It was located adjacent to Greenland Dock and part of the Surrey Docks, though it was directly accessible from the river.

Greenland Pier

Greenland Dock Pier
Thames Clippers' water-bus serves Greenland Pier.
It is situated at the eastern end of Greenland Dock in the London Borough of Southwark, and is a stop on the Thames commuter catamaran service.

Surrey Quays

Surrey DocksSurrey Quays Shopping Centre
The only surviving areas of open water were Greenland Dock, South Dock, part of Canada Dock (renamed Canada Water), remnants of Norway Dock, and a basin renamed Surrey Water.

Malcolm Hardee

Malcolm Hardee AwardMalcolm Hardee Award for Comic OriginalityMalcolm Hardee Awards
The alternative comedian Malcolm Hardee drowned in the dock in 2005 while rowing to his houseboat, Sea Sovereign, from the floating pub he owned, the Wibbley Wobbley, which is moored at the Thames end of Greenland Dock.
In 2001, after he sold his percentage in Up The Creek, Hardee took over a floating pub, The Wibbley Wobbley, on a converted Rhine pleasure cruiser in Greenland Dock, Rotherhithe, by the River Thames.

Thames Clippers

Thames ClipperMBNA Thames ClippersCommuter Service
Thames Clippers' water-bus serves Greenland Pier.

Baltic Quay

This went ahead in the late 1980s despite some controversy, with seven residential developments being constructed on the site of the former warehouse complexes (and named after them; hence Swedish Yard became Swedish Quay, Brunswick Yard became Brunswick Quay, Baltic Yard became Baltic Quay and so on).
Situated between South Dock and Greenland Dock, the building was originally intended for mixed use; the ground floors as commercial outlets, the 1st and 2nd floors as office space and the remaining floors as residential apartments.

London

London, EnglandLondon, United KingdomLondon, UK
Greenland Dock is the oldest of London's riverside wet docks, located in Rotherhithe in the area of the city now known as Docklands.

River Thames

ThamesThames Riverthe Thames
Greenland Dock is now used purely for recreational purposes; it is one of only two functioning enclosed docks on the south bank of the River Thames.

William Russell, 1st Duke of Bedford

William Russell, 5th Earl of BedfordEarl of BedfordWilliam Russell
The dock was originally laid out between 1695 and 1699 on land owned by the aristocratic Russell family of the 1st Duke of Bedford.

Streatham

Streatham HillStreatham ValeStreatham, Surrey
The Russells had been given a portion of land in lower Rotherhithe by a wealthy Streatham landowner, John Howland, as part of a wedding dowry for his daughter Elizabeth, granddaughter of Sir Josiah Child – the dictatorial chairman of the East India Company, who married Wriothesley Russell, the Marquis of Tavistock.

Josiah Child

Sir Josiah ChildSir Josiah Child, 1st BaronetChild of Wanstead
The Russells had been given a portion of land in lower Rotherhithe by a wealthy Streatham landowner, John Howland, as part of a wedding dowry for his daughter Elizabeth, granddaughter of Sir Josiah Child – the dictatorial chairman of the East India Company, who married Wriothesley Russell, the Marquis of Tavistock.

East India Company

British East India CompanyHonourable East India CompanyEnglish East India Company
The Russells had been given a portion of land in lower Rotherhithe by a wealthy Streatham landowner, John Howland, as part of a wedding dowry for his daughter Elizabeth, granddaughter of Sir Josiah Child – the dictatorial chairman of the East India Company, who married Wriothesley Russell, the Marquis of Tavistock.

Freight transport

shippingshipmentmaritime
Unlike the later docks, it was not built with cargo traffic in mind; it did not have walls, warehouses or other commercial facilities.