Greenlandic language

GreenlandicKalaallisutGreenlandic InuitWest GreenlandicKalaallisut languageGreenlandic-languageGreenlandishWest Greenlandic EskimoGreelandicGreenland
Greenlandic is an Eskimo–Aleut language spoken by about 56,000 Greenlandic Inuit in Greenland.wikipedia
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Greenlandic Inuit

InuitGreenlandicEskimo
Greenlandic is an Eskimo–Aleut language spoken by about 56,000 Greenlandic Inuit in Greenland.
Most speak Greenlandic (Western Greenlandic, Kalaallisut) and consider themselves ethnically Greenlandic.

Inuit languages

InuitInuit languageInuktitut
It is closely related to the Inuit languages in Canada such as Inuktitut.
In other languages, it is often called Greenlandic or some cognate term.

Greenland

🇬🇱GreenlandicGL
Greenlandic is an Eskimo–Aleut language spoken by about 56,000 Greenlandic Inuit in Greenland.
The name of the country in the indigenous Greenlandic language is Kalaallit Nunaat ("land of the Kalaallit").

Kalaallisut

GreenlandicKalaallisut (West Greenland Inuit)Standard Greenlandic
The main variety, Kalaallisut or West Greenlandic, has been the official language of the Greenlandic autonomous territory since June 2009; this is a move by the Naalakkersuisut (government of Greenland) to strengthen the language in its competition with the colonial language, Danish.
Kalaallisut, or West Greenlandic, is the standard dialect of the Greenlandic language, spoken by the vast majority of the inhabitants of Greenland, as well as by thousands of Greenlandic Inuit in Denmark proper (in total, approximately 50,000 people).

Tunumiit dialect

TunumiitEast GreenlandicTunumiisut
The second variety is Tunumiit oraasiat or East Greenlandic. The eastern dialect (Tunumiit oraasiat), spoken in the vicinity of Ammassalik Island and Ittoqqortoormiit, is the most innovative of the Greenlandic dialects, having assimilated consonant clusters and vowel sequences to a greater extent than West Greenlandic.
Tunumiit oraasiat or East Greenlandic (Kalaallisut: tunumiusut, East Greenlandic: tunumiisut) is a variety of Greenlandic spoken in eastern Greenland by the Tunumiit.

Inuktitut

ikuAivilingmiututike
It is closely related to the Inuit languages in Canada such as Inuktitut. The Thule Inuit of Greenland, Inuktun or Polar Eskimo, is a recent arrival and a dialect of Inuktitut.
Though often thought to be a dialect of Greenlandic, Inuktun or Polar Eskimo is a recent arrival in Greenland from the Eastern Canadian Arctic, arriving perhaps as late as the 18th century.

Ittoqqortoormiit

ScoresbysundIttoqqortoomit (Scoresbysund)
The eastern dialect (Tunumiit oraasiat), spoken in the vicinity of Ammassalik Island and Ittoqqortoormiit, is the most innovative of the Greenlandic dialects, having assimilated consonant clusters and vowel sequences to a greater extent than West Greenlandic.
Ittoqqortoormiit (East Greenlandic) or Illoqqortoormiut (West Greenlandic), formerly known as Scoresbysund, is a settlement in the Sermersooq municipality in eastern Greenland.

Subject (grammar)

subjectsubjectsgrammatical subject
Verbs are inflected for one of the eight moods and for the number and person of its subject and object.
But there are some languages such as Basque or Greenlandic, in which the form of a noun or pronoun when the verb is intransitive (he ran) is different from when the verb is transitive (he broke the window). In these languages, which are known as ergative languages, the concept of 'subject' may not apply at all.

Upernavik

One that is spoken around Upernavik has certain similarities to East Greenlandic, possibly because of a previous migration from eastern Greenland.
Upernavik (Kalaallisut: "Springtime Place" ) is a small town in the Avannaata municipality in northwestern Greenland, located on a small island of the same name.

Samuel Kleinschmidt

The first orthography was developed by Samuel Kleinschmidt in 1851, but within a hundred years already differed substantially from the spoken language because of a number of sound changes.
Samuel Petrus Kleinschmidt (27 February 1814–9 February 1886) was a German/Danish missionary linguist born in Greenland known for having written extensively about the Greenlandic language and having invented the orthography used for writing this language from 1851 to 1973.

Inuktun

Avannarhuarmiutut (North Thule Greenlandic)North GreenlandicPolar Eskimo
The Thule Inuit of Greenland, Inuktun or Polar Eskimo, is a recent arrival and a dialect of Inuktitut.
The language is an Eskimo–Aleut language and dialectologically it is in between the Greenlandic Kalaallisut and the Canadian Inuktitut, Inuvialuktun or Inuinnaqtun.

Nuuk

GodthåbGodthaabDK-3900 Nuuk
The standard language is based on the central Kalaallisut dialect spoken in Sisimiut in the north, around Nuuk and as far south as Maniitsoq.
"Nuuk" is the Kalaallisut word for "cape" (næs).

Danish language

DanishDanish-languageda
The main variety, Kalaallisut or West Greenlandic, has been the official language of the Greenlandic autonomous territory since June 2009; this is a move by the Naalakkersuisut (government of Greenland) to strengthen the language in its competition with the colonial language, Danish.
Until 2009, it had also been one of two official languages of Greenland (alongside Greenlandic).

Narsaq

Southern Kalaallisut is spoken around Narsaq and Qaqortoq in the south.
The name Narsaq is Kalaallisut for "Plain", referring to the shore of Tunulliarfik Fjord where the town is located.

Kalaallit Nunaata Radioa

KNRGreenlandicGrønlands R.
Today Greenlandic has several dedicated news media: the Greenlandic National Radio, Kalaallit Nunaata Radioa, which provides television and radio programming in Greenlandic.
KNR1 is the primary channel and the programmning is mainly in the Greenlandic language (Kalaallisut).

Atuagagdliutit/Grønlandsposten

Atuagagdliutit
The newspaper Sermitsiaq, has been published since 1958, and in 2010 merged with the other newspaper Atuagagdliutit/Grønlandsposten, which was established already in 1861 to form a single large Greenlandic language publishing house.
The newspaper is a merge of a Kalaallisut newspaper (Atuagagdliutit) and a Danish newspaper (Grønlandsposten) and all articles are now printed in both languages.

Sermitsiaq (newspaper)

SermitsiaqSermitisiaq
The newspaper Sermitsiaq, has been published since 1958, and in 2010 merged with the other newspaper Atuagagdliutit/Grønlandsposten, which was established already in 1861 to form a single large Greenlandic language publishing house.
The newspaper was published for the first time May 21, 1958, as a Kalaallisut-language alternative to the Danish-language newspaper Mikken.

Grammatical mood

moodmoodsmode
Verbs are inflected for one of the eight moods and for the number and person of its subject and object.
Most other languages do not have a special mood for asking questions, but exceptions include Welsh, Nenets and Eskimo languages such as Greenlandic.

Transitivity (grammar)

transitivitytransitiveintransitive
Basic word order in transitive clauses is subject–object–verb.
Languages of both branches of the Eskimo–Aleut family; for details from the Eskimo branch, see e.g. Sireniki, Kalaallisut

Dual (grammatical number)

dualdual numberdual form
The language distinguishes four persons (1st, 2nd, 3rd and 4th or 3rd reflexive (see Obviation and switch-reference), two numbers (singular and plural; no dual as in Inuktitut), eight moods (indicative, participial, imperative/optative, interrogative, past subjunctive, future subjunctive and habitual subjunctive) and eight cases (absolutive, ergative, equative, instrumental, locative, allative, ablative and prolative).
Inuktitut and the related Central Alaskan Yup'ik language use dual forms; however, the related Greenlandic language does not (though it used to have them).

Polysynthetic language

polysyntheticpolysynthesispolysynthetic languages
Greenlandic is a polysynthetic language that allows the creation of long words by stringing together roots and suffixes.
An example from Western Greenlandic, an exclusively suffixing polysynthetic language:

Paul Egede

PoulPaul
The missionary Paul Egede wrote the first Greenlandic dictionary in 1750, and the first grammar in 1760.
Egede and an kalaaleq woman named Arnarsaq translated the New Testament into Kalaallisut, the language of the West Greenland Inuit.

Voiceless dental and alveolar lateral fricatives

voiceless alveolar lateral fricativevoiceless lateral fricativeɬ
These assimilations mean that one of the most recognizable Inuktitut words, iglu ("house"), is illu in Greenlandic, where the consonant cluster of Inuktitut is assimilated into a voiceless alveolar lateral fricative.

Interrogative

interrogative sentenceinterrogative moodQuestions
The four independent moods are: indicative, interrogative, imperative, optative.
Languages with some degree of this feature include Irish, Scottish Gaelic, Welsh, Greenlandic, Nenets, Central Alaskan Yup'ik, Turkish, Finnish, Korean and Venetian.

Kra (letter)

ĸkra
This alphabet employed the special character kra which was replaced by q in the 1973 reform.
Kra (Kʼ / ĸ) is a glyph formerly used to write the Kalaallisut language of Greenland and is now only found in Nunatsiavummiutut, a distinct Inuktitut dialect.