Greenwich

East GreenwichGreenwich, LondonManor of East GreenwichNorth GreenwichGMTGreenwich WestMaritime GreenwichCrooms HillDiscover Greenwich Visitor CentreGreenreach
Greenwich is an area of south east London, England, located 5.5 mi east-southeast of Charing Cross.wikipedia
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Greenwich Mean Time

GMTGMT+4UTC±00:00
Greenwich is notable for its maritime history and for giving its name to the Greenwich Meridian (0° longitude) and Greenwich Mean Time.
Greenwich Mean Time (GMT) is the mean solar time at the Royal Observatory in Greenwich, London, reckoned from midnight.

Prime meridian (Greenwich)

Prime MeridianGreenwich meridianGreenwich
Greenwich is notable for its maritime history and for giving its name to the Greenwich Meridian (0° longitude) and Greenwich Mean Time.
A prime meridian, based at the Royal Observatory, Greenwich, in London, England, was established by Sir George Airy in 1851.

National Maritime Museum

NMMNational MaritimeCaird Medal
The maritime connections of Greenwich were celebrated in the 20th century, with the siting of the Cutty Sark and Gipsy Moth IV next to the river front, and the National Maritime Museum in the former buildings of the Royal Hospital School in 1934.
The National Maritime Museum (NMM) in Greenwich, London, is a maritime museum in London.

Palace of Placentia

Greenwich PalaceGreenwichpalace
The town became the site of a royal palace, the Palace of Placentia from the 15th century, and was the birthplace of many Tudors, including Henry VIII and Elizabeth I. It was renamed the Palace of Placentia or Pleasaunce by Henry VI's consort Margaret of Anjou after Humphrey's death.
The Palace of Placentia was an English Royal Palace built by Humphrey, Duke of Gloucester, in 1443, in Greenwich, on the banks of the River Thames, downstream from London.

Cutty Sark

famous clipper ship of the same nameFerreiratea clipper
The maritime connections of Greenwich were celebrated in the 20th century, with the siting of the Cutty Sark and Gipsy Moth IV next to the river front, and the National Maritime Museum in the former buildings of the Royal Hospital School in 1934.
After his death, Cutty Sark was transferred to the Thames Nautical Training College, Greenhithe in 1938 where she became an auxiliary cadet training ship alongside HMS Worcester. By 1954, she had ceased to be useful as a cadet ship and was transferred to permanent dry dock at Greenwich, London, for public display.

University of Greenwich

Woolwich PolytechnicGreenwichThames Polytechnic
The historic rooms within these buildings remain open to the public; other buildings are used by University of Greenwich and Trinity Laban Conservatoire of Music and Dance.
In 2001, the university gave up its historic main campus in the Bathway Quarter in Woolwich, relocating to its current main campus in Greenwich.

Royal Hospital School

Greenwich Hospital SchoolGreenwich SchoolBand of the Royal Hospital School
The maritime connections of Greenwich were celebrated in the 20th century, with the siting of the Cutty Sark and Gipsy Moth IV next to the river front, and the National Maritime Museum in the former buildings of the Royal Hospital School in 1934.
It was originally located at Greenwich Hospital in Greenwich.

Vanbrugh Castle

castle" in Greenwich
The town became a popular resort in the 18th century and many grand houses were built there, such as Vanbrugh Castle (1717) established on Maze Hill, next to the park.
Vanbrugh Castle is a house designed and built by John Vanbrugh for his own family, located on Maze Hill on the eastern edge of Greenwich Park in London, to the north of Blackheath, with views to the west past the Old Royal Naval College at Greenwich down to the Thames reaching as far as the Houses of Parliament.

Greenwich Hospital, London

Greenwich HospitalRoyal Naval HospitalGovernor of Greenwich Hospital
The palace fell into disrepair during the English Civil War and was rebuilt as the Royal Naval Hospital for Sailors by Sir Christopher Wren and his assistant Nicholas Hawksmoor.
Its four main buildings (the "Courts") are bisected north-south by a Grand Square and processional route, and east-west by an internal road from the East Gate (and gate-house) to the West Gate (and gate-house) by Greenwich Market in Greenwich town centre.

Greenwich Park

GreenreachGreenwich Royal Park
Tumuli to the south-west of Flamsteed House, in Greenwich Park, are thought to be early Bronze Age barrows re-used by the Saxons in the 6th century as burial grounds.
Greenwich Park is a former hunting park in Greenwich and one of the largest single green spaces in south-east London.

Greenwich, Connecticut

GreenwichGreenwich, CTConnecticut
Greenwich, Connecticut was also named after Greenwich.
The town is named after Greenwich, a Royal borough of London in the United Kingdom.

East Greenwich, Rhode Island

East GreenwichEastEast Greenwich, R. I.
Places in North America that have taken the name "East Greenwich" include a township in Gloucester County, New Jersey, a hamlet in Washington County, New York, and a town in Kent County, Rhode Island.
Formed as Greenwich in 1677, it was named for Greenwich, England.

Kent

County of KentKent, EnglandCounty Kent
Greenwich formed part of Kent until 1889 when the County of London was created.
These included the towns of Deptford, Greenwich, Woolwich, Lee, Eltham, Charlton, Kidbrooke and Lewisham.

St Alfege Church, Greenwich

St Alfege's ChurchSt Alfege ChurchSt Alfege
The present church on the site west of the town centre is St Alfege's Church, designed by Nicholas Hawksmoor in 1714 and completed in 1718.
St Alfege Church is an Anglican church in the centre of Greenwich, part of the Royal Borough of Greenwich in London.

Blackheath, London

BlackheathBlackheath HillBlackheath Park
Some vestiges of the Danish camps may be traced in the names of Eastcombe and Westcombe, on the borders of nearby Blackheath.
It is located east of Lewisham, and south of Greenwich.

Deptford

Deptford BroadwayDeptford GreenDeptford Bridge
The settlement later became known as East Greenwich to distinguish it from West Greenwich or Deptford Strond, the part of Deptford adjacent to the Thames, but the use of East Greenwich to mean the whole of the town of Greenwich died out in the 19th century.
Deptford borders the areas of Brockley and Lewisham to the south, New Cross to the west and Rotherhithe to the north west; Deptford Creek divides it from Greenwich to the east, and the River Thames separates the area from the Isle of Dogs to the north east; it is contained within the London SE8 post code area.

Queen's House

Queen’s House
In 1616 Anne commissioned Inigo Jones to design and build the surviving Queen's House as the final addition to the palace.
Queen's House is a former royal residence built between 1616 and 1635 in Greenwich, a few miles down-river from the then City of London and now a London Borough.

Mary I of England

Mary IQueen MaryMary
Henry VIII married Catherine of Aragon and Anne of Cleves at Greenwich, and both Mary (18 February 1516) and Elizabeth (7 September 1533) were born at Greenwich.
Mary was born on 18 February 1516 at the Palace of Placentia in Greenwich, England.

Gipsy Moth IV

The maritime connections of Greenwich were celebrated in the 20th century, with the siting of the Cutty Sark and Gipsy Moth IV next to the river front, and the National Maritime Museum in the former buildings of the Royal Hospital School in 1934.
In July 1968, Gipsy Moth IV was put on permanent display at Greenwich in a land-locked purpose-built dry dock next to the Cutty Sark.

Hundred of Blackheath, Kent

BlackheathBlackheath, KentHundred of Blackheath
The name of the hundred was changed to Blackheath when the site of the hundred court was moved there in the 12th century.
The hundred contained the parishes of Charlton, Chislehurst, St Paul and St Nicholas Deptford, Eltham, Greenwich, Kidbrooke, Lee, Lewisham, Woolwich and Mottingham.

Greenwich Theatre

GreenwichCrowder's Music HallGreenwich Theatre, London
In 1864 opposite the railway terminus, theatrical entrepreneur Sefton Parry built the thousand seater New Greenwich Theatre.
Greenwich Theatre is a local theatre located in Croom's Hill close to the centre of Greenwich in south-east London.

Margaret of Anjou

Queen MargaretMargaretQueen
It was renamed the Palace of Placentia or Pleasaunce by Henry VI's consort Margaret of Anjou after Humphrey's death.
After retiring from London to live in lavish state at Greenwich, Margaret was occupied with the care of her young son and did not display any signs of political will until she believed her husband was threatened with deposition by the ambitious Richard of York, 3rd Duke of York, who, to her consternation, had been appointed Lord Protector while Henry was mentally incapacitated from 1453 to 1454.

Royal Borough of Greenwich

GreenwichLondon Borough of GreenwichGreenwich Council
It is located within the Royal Borough of Greenwich, to which it lends its name.
Taking its name from the historic town of Greenwich, the London Borough of Greenwich was formed in 1965 by the amalgamation of the former area of the Metropolitan Borough of Greenwich with part of the Metropolitan Borough of Woolwich to the east.

Nicholas Hawksmoor

HawksmoorHawksmoor.
The palace fell into disrepair during the English Civil War and was rebuilt as the Royal Naval Hospital for Sailors by Sir Christopher Wren and his assistant Nicholas Hawksmoor. The present church on the site west of the town centre is St Alfege's Church, designed by Nicholas Hawksmoor in 1714 and completed in 1718.
Thanks to Wren's influence as Surveyor-General, Hawksmoor was named Clerk of the Works at Kensington Palace (1689) and Deputy Surveyor of Works at Greenwich (1705).

Sefton Henry Parry

Sefton Parry
In 1864 opposite the railway terminus, theatrical entrepreneur Sefton Parry built the thousand seater New Greenwich Theatre.
Returning to England, he set up home in Greenwich, built a theatre there in 1864 and, over the next twenty years, built three more in London and two in the provinces.