Greenwich Village

MacDougal Street in Greenwich Village
453–461 Sixth Avenue in the Historic District
The intersection of West 4th and West 12th Streets
Street signs at intersection of West 10th and West 4th Streets
Map of old Greenwich Village. A section of Bernard Ratzer's map of New York and its suburbs, made ca. 1766 for Henry Moore, royal governor of New York, when Greenwich was more than 2 miles (3 km) from the city.
Gay Street at the corner of Waverly Place; the street's name refers to a colonial family, not the LGBT character of Greenwich Village
Whitney Museum of American Art's original location, at 8–12 West 8th Street, between Fifth Avenue and MacDougal Street; currently home to the New York Studio School of Drawing, Painting and Sculpture.
The Cherry Lane Theatre is located in Greenwich Village.
The annual Greenwich Village Halloween Parade is the world's largest Halloween parade.
The Stonewall Inn, a designated U.S. National Historic Landmark and National Monument, as the site of the June 1969 Stonewall riots and the cradle of the modern gay rights movement.
Blue Note Jazz Club
The Washington Square Arch, an unofficial icon of Greenwich Village and nearby New York University
396-397 West Street at West 10th Street is a former hotel which dates from 1904, and is part of the Weehawken Street Historic District
Washington Mews in Greenwich Village; an NYU building can be seen in the background
Christopher Park, part of the Stonewall National Monument
NYPD 6th Precinct
West Village Post Office
Jefferson Market Library, once a courthouse, now serves as a branch of the New York Public Library.
Robert De Niro
Robert Downey Jr.
Hank Greenberg
Emma Stone
90 Bedford Street, used for establishing shot in Friends

Neighborhood on the west side of Lower Manhattan in New York City, bounded by 14th Street to the north, Broadway to the east, Houston Street to the south, and the Hudson River to the west.

- Greenwich Village

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New York University

Private research university in New York City.

Private research university in New York City.

Albert Gallatin (1761–1849) by Gilbert Stuart
NYU Building in Washington Square, 1850
The University Heights campus, now home to Bronx Community College
Washington Square Park, with its gateway arch, is surrounded largely by NYU buildings and plays an integral role in the university's campus life.
Bobst Library
Bern Dibner Library of Science and Technology on the Brooklyn campus
NYU Langone Health
NYU Abu Dhabi
NYU Shanghai
Washington Square Village, home to NYU faculty and graduate students
A bus system transports students to and from the far ends of campus.
Jack Dorsey, American billionaire and internet entrepreneur, founder and CEO of Twitter and Square, Inc.; CAS (dropped out)
Robert Muller III, American public official; lead director of the Special Counsel investigation, author of the Mueller Report, former Director of the Federal Bureau of Investigation; GSAS '67
Alan Greenspan, American economist and public official; former long-time Chairman of the Federal Reserve; Stern '48, '50, '77
Carol Bellamy, American politician; former executive director of the United Nations Children's Fund (UNICEF); Law '68
Ma Ying-jeou, Taiwanese politician; Former President of the Republic of China; Law '76
Jonas Salk, American biologist; creator of the polio vaccine; founder of the Salk Institute; Medicine '39
Martin Scorsese, American filmmaker, director and actor; AFI Life Achievement Award winner, 20-time Academy Award winner, 23-time BAFTA winner, 11-time Golden Globes winner; CAS '64, Steinhardt '68
Spike Lee, American filmmaker, director and producer; two-time Academy Award winner; two-time Emmy Award winner; Tisch '83
Ang Lee OBS, Taiwanese film director; three-time Academy Award winner; two-time Golden Lion winner; Tisch '83
Alan Menken, American composer, songwriter, and record producer; one of only sixteen people to have won an Oscar, an Emmy, a Grammy, and a Tony; Steinhart '71
Suzanne Collins, American television writer and author; Author of The New York Times best-selling series The Underland Chronicles and The Hunger Games trilogy; Tisch '89
Alec Baldwin, American actor, writer, comedian and philanthropist; three-time Emmy Award winner; three-time Golden Globe winner; Tisch '94
Lady Gaga, American singer, songwriter, and actress; nine-time Grammy Award winner; thirteen-time MTV Video Music Award winner; Tisch (dropped out)
Angelina Jolie, American actress and humanitarian; three-time Golden Globe Award winner; Special Envoy to the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees; Tisch (non-degree seeking)
Mahershala Ali, American actor; two-time Academy Award winner; Golden Globe Award winner; three-time Screen Actors Guild Award winner; Tisch '00
Woody Allen, American director, actor and comedian; four-time Academy Award winner; nine-time BAFTA Award winner; Tisch (dropped out)
Adam Sandler, American actor, director and comedian; five-time MTV Movie & TV Award winner; eight-time People's Choice Award winner; Tisch '88
Donald Glover, American actor, comedian, screenwriter, and singer; two-time Golden Globe Award winner; five-time Grammy Award winner; Tisch '06
Anne Hathaway, American actress; Academy Award and Golden Globe Award winner; Gallatin (dropped out)
Tom Ford, American fashion designer and filmmaker; former creative director at Gucci and Yves Saint Laurent; CAS (dropped out)

The university, in 1833, then moved and has maintained its main campus in Greenwich Village surrounding Washington Square Park.

Lower Manhattan

Southernmost part of Manhattan, the central borough for business, culture, and government in New York City.

Southernmost part of Manhattan, the central borough for business, culture, and government in New York City.

The pre-9/11 Lower Manhattan skyline in May 2001, seen from the Empire State Building. The skyline was dominated by The Twin Towers.
New Amsterdam, centered in the eventual Lower Manhattan, in 1664, the year England took control and renamed it "New York".
The Cooper Union at Astor Place, where Abraham Lincoln gave his famed Cooper Union speech, is one of the area's most storied buildings.
Photo of Lower Manhattan pictured in 1931
Peter Stuyvesant
View of New York harbor, ca. 1770
Norman Friend. Sidney's Map Twelve Miles Around New York, 1849. Chromo lithograph, Brooklyn Museum
View from the Woolworth Building in 1913
View from an airplane in 1981
The Stonewall Inn in Greenwich Village, a designated U.S. National Historic Landmark and National Monument, as the site of the June 1969 Stonewall riots and the cradle of the modern gay rights movement.
United Airlines Flight 175 hits the South Tower of the original World Trade Center on September 11, 2001.
Picture of Lower Manhattan skyline, including the One World Trade Center; taken from Little Island at Pier 55 in November 2021
Chinatown is home to the highest concentration of Chinese people in the Western Hemisphere.
The park and surrounding neighborhood of Union Square, located between 14th and 17th Streets, may be considered a part of either Lower or Midtown Manhattan.
The New York Stock Exchange, by a significant margin the world's largest stock exchange per market capitalization of its listed companies, at US$23.1 trillion as of April 2018. Pictured is the exchange's building on Wall Street.
New York City Hall in Lower Manhattan's Civic Center neighborhood

North of Canal Street and south of 14th Street are the neighborhoods of SoHo, the Meatpacking District, the West Village, Greenwich Village, Little Italy, Nolita, and the East Village.

The "skyscraper alley" of International Style buildings along the avenue looking north from 40th Street to Central Park

Sixth Avenue

Seldom used by New Yorkers – is a major thoroughfare in New York City's borough of Manhattan, on which traffic runs northbound, or "uptown".

Seldom used by New Yorkers – is a major thoroughfare in New York City's borough of Manhattan, on which traffic runs northbound, or "uptown".

The "skyscraper alley" of International Style buildings along the avenue looking north from 40th Street to Central Park
Looking north from 14th Street in 1905, with the Sixth Avenue El on the right
The historic Ladies' Mile shopping district that thrived along Sixth Avenue left behind some of the largest retail spaces in the city. Beginning in the 1990s, the buildings began to be reused after being dormant for decades.
Sixth Avenue in 1922
Sign for Venezuela on Sixth Avenue
Jefferson Market Library in Greenwich Village

From this beginning, Sixth Avenue traverses SoHo and Greenwich Village, roughly divides Chelsea from the Flatiron District and NoMad, passes through the Garment District and skirts the edge of the Theater District while passing through Midtown Manhattan.

Union Square looking north from 14th Street (May 2010)

Union Square, Manhattan

Historic intersection and surrounding neighborhood in Manhattan, New York City, located where Broadway and the former Bowery Road – now Fourth Avenue – came together in the early 19th century.

Historic intersection and surrounding neighborhood in Manhattan, New York City, located where Broadway and the former Bowery Road – now Fourth Avenue – came together in the early 19th century.

Union Square looking north from 14th Street (May 2010)
Union Park New York (East side), New York Public Library
George Washington Statue at Union Square
Union Square in 1908
The renovated pavilion at the north end of the park in February 2011
W New York Union Square; the Everett Building can be seen at left
Mohandas Gandhi
The outdoor Greenmarket Farmers Market, held four days each week
The former Kellogg's cafe at Union Square; the AT&T Wireless store is underneath it and next to the entrance
Spectators watch as a street chess player plays bullet chess with a customer in Union Square.
{{center|Boy selling newspapers in Union Square, July 1910}}
{{center|The square in the blizzard of 2006}}
{{center|14th Street–Union Square station entrance}}
{{center|Metronome by Kristin Jones/Andrew Ginzel (1999)}}
{{center|Metronome revision by Andrew Boyd and Gan Golan (2020)}}
{{center|Union Square West (2011), including the Bank of the Metropolis Building and Decker Building, on the left (downtown) end of the block}}
{{center|Former Germania Life Insurance Company Building, now the W New York Union Square Hotel}}
{{center|Former Union Square Savings Bank, now the Daryl Roth Theatre}}
{{center|Zeckendorf Towers with the renovated north plaza of the park in the foreground, and the Con Ed Building in the background}}

Adjacent neighborhoods are the Flatiron District to the north, Chelsea to the west, Greenwich Village to the southwest, East Village to the southeast, and Gramercy Park to the east.

Lawrence Ferlinghetti

Beat Generation

Literary movement started by a group of authors whose work explored and influenced American culture and politics in the post-war era.

Literary movement started by a group of authors whose work explored and influenced American culture and politics in the post-war era.

Lawrence Ferlinghetti
A section devoted to the beat generation at a bookstore in Stockholm, Sweden

Beat writers and artists flocked to Greenwich Village in New York City in the late 1950s because of low rent and the "small town" element of the scene.

West Village from MacDougal Street

West Village

West Village from MacDougal Street
The Stonewall Inn at 53 Christopher Street, a designated U.S. National Historic Landmark and National Monument, as the site of the 1969 Stonewall Riots.
396-397 West Street at West 10th Street is a former hotel which dates from 1904, and is part of the Weehawken Street Historic District
173 and 176 Perry Street, rare examples of modern architecture in the Far West Village.
Gay Street at the corner of Waverly Place
The Cherry Lane Theatre is located in the West Village.
The annual Greenwich Village Halloween Parade is the world's largest Halloween parade and takes place in the West Village.
Some 18th-century streets, such as Bedford Street (pictured), are narrow.
66 Perry Street was featured in Sex and the City as Carrie Bradshaw's house.
NYPD 6th Precinct
West Village Post Office
Jefferson Market Library, once a courthouse, now serves as a branch of the New York Public Library.
Whitney Museum of American Art under construction in 2013

The West Village is a neighborhood in the western section of the larger Greenwich Village neighborhood of Lower Manhattan, New York City.

Peretz Square, Houston Street on left; 1st Street on right

List of numbered streets in Manhattan

The New York City borough of Manhattan contains 214 numbered east–west streets ranging from 1st to 228th, the majority of them designated in the Commissioners' Plan of 1811.

The New York City borough of Manhattan contains 214 numbered east–west streets ranging from 1st to 228th, the majority of them designated in the Commissioners' Plan of 1811.

Peretz Square, Houston Street on left; 1st Street on right
St. Mark's Place
Little West 12th Street as viewed from the rooftop of The Standard, High Line
14th Street–Union Square station
Irving Place Theatre, from Northeast corner of Irving Place and East 15th Street
The Center for Jewish History at 15 West 16th Street
Bike parking at 17th Street
33 East 17th Street (NRHP)
Gershwin Hotel on East 27th Street
Korea Way in Koreatown, as seen on 32nd Street, with ubiquitous street signage in Hangul (한글)
A view of the Empire State Building from 33rd Street and Park Avenue Subway Station
Shops along Designers' Way
Mount Vernon Hotel Museum on East 61st Street
Archdiocesan Cathedral of the Holy Trinity
120-130 East 80th Street, with three of the four East 80th Street Houses; the Astor House is on the left, the Whitney House on the right, and the Dillon House is between them.
112th Street East of Broadway
Butler Library
Jewish Theological Seminary
The Apollo Theater
Western end
Underneath; unconnected
East end of 181st Street
West 187th Street stairs to Ft. Washington Avenue

Although the numbered streets begin just north of East Houston Street in the East Village, they generally do not extend west into Greenwich Village, which already had established, named streets when the grid plan was laid out by the Commissioners' Plan of 1811.

The only known photograph taken during the first night of riots, by freelance photographer Joseph Ambrosini, shows gay youth scuffling with police.

Stonewall riots

The only known photograph taken during the first night of riots, by freelance photographer Joseph Ambrosini, shows gay youth scuffling with police.
Washington Square Park in Greenwich Village
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Christopher Park, where many of the demonstrators met after the first night of rioting to talk about what had happened, now features a sculpture of four white figures by George Segal that commemorates the milestone.
Gay rights demonstration in Trafalgar Square, London, including members of the Gay Liberation Front (GLF). The GLF in the UK held its first meeting in a basement classroom at the London School of Economics on October 13, 1970. The organization was very informal, instituting marches and other activities, leading to the first British Gay Pride March in 1972.
Banner reading "Stonewall was a riot" pictured during Berlin Pride, 2009
Queer anarchists at Stockholm pride with banner reading "Remember Stonewall"
The Stonewall, a bar in part of the building where the Stonewall Inn was located. The building and the surrounding streets have been declared a National Historic Landmark.
The sign left by police following the raid is now on display just inside the entrance.
A banner hanging from the top of the building the day after President Obama announced creation of the Stonewall National Monument
Stonewall Day logo by Pride Live
Plaque commemorating the Stonewall Riots

The Stonewall riots (also known as the Stonewall uprising, Stonewall rebellion, or simply Stonewall) were a series of spontaneous protests by members of the gay community in response to a police raid that began in the early morning hours of June 28, 1969, at the Stonewall Inn in the Greenwich Village neighborhood of Lower Manhattan in New York City.

Stretch of the Hudson River (in red) between New Jersey and Manhattan anachronistically referred to as the North River

North River (Hudson River)

Alternative name for the southernmost portion of the Hudson River in the vicinity of New York City and northeastern New Jersey in the United States.

Alternative name for the southernmost portion of the Hudson River in the vicinity of New York City and northeastern New Jersey in the United States.

Stretch of the Hudson River (in red) between New Jersey and Manhattan anachronistically referred to as the North River
The Hudson looking south from atop the Hudson Palisades, anachronistically referred to by some as the North River
Flight 1549 landed on the Hudson River in waters referred to by some as the North River.
Revolutionary-era map using both names
North River label of a stretch of the Hudson River between Hudson County, New Jersey, and Lower Manhattan on a 1997 Hagstrom Map of Manhattan
Chelsea Piers, with the Lusitania docked, circa 1910
Rebuilding of Pier 97 in Hudson River Park
Javits Center, behind which is located New York Waterway's Midtown Ferry Terminal at Pier 79. The Weehawken Yards were across the river at the base of the Hudson Palisades.
Railroad and ferry terminals along the North River circa 1900

The term "Christopher Street Pier" usually refers specifically to Pier 45 opposite West 10th Street in Greenwich Village. However, it refers to three other piers as well, between Piers 42–51. Pier 51 houses a water-themed playground, part of Hudson River Park.

14th Street looking west from Fifth Avenue

14th Street (Manhattan)

Major crosstown street in the New York City borough of Manhattan, traveling between Eleventh Avenue on Manhattan's West Side and Avenue C on Manhattan's East Side.

Major crosstown street in the New York City borough of Manhattan, traveling between Eleventh Avenue on Manhattan's West Side and Avenue C on Manhattan's East Side.

14th Street looking west from Fifth Avenue
14th Street–Union Square station

It is also considered the northern boundary of Greenwich Village, Alphabet City, and the East Village, and the southern boundary of Chelsea, Flatiron/Lower Midtown, and Gramercy.