West Village from MacDougal Street
Peretz Square, Houston Street on left; 1st Street on right
MacDougal Street in Greenwich Village
The Stonewall Inn at 53 Christopher Street, a designated U.S. National Historic Landmark and National Monument, as the site of the 1969 Stonewall Riots.
St. Mark's Place
453–461 Sixth Avenue in the Historic District
396-397 West Street at West 10th Street is a former hotel which dates from 1904, and is part of the Weehawken Street Historic District
Little West 12th Street as viewed from the rooftop of The Standard, High Line
The intersection of West 4th and West 12th Streets
173 and 176 Perry Street, rare examples of modern architecture in the Far West Village.
14th Street–Union Square station
Street signs at intersection of West 10th and West 4th Streets
Gay Street at the corner of Waverly Place
Irving Place Theatre, from Northeast corner of Irving Place and East 15th Street
Map of old Greenwich Village. A section of Bernard Ratzer's map of New York and its suburbs, made ca. 1766 for Henry Moore, royal governor of New York, when Greenwich was more than 2 miles (3 km) from the city.
The Cherry Lane Theatre is located in the West Village.
The Center for Jewish History at 15 West 16th Street
Gay Street at the corner of Waverly Place; the street's name refers to a colonial family, not the LGBT character of Greenwich Village
The annual Greenwich Village Halloween Parade is the world's largest Halloween parade and takes place in the West Village.
Bike parking at 17th Street
Whitney Museum of American Art's original location, at 8–12 West 8th Street, between Fifth Avenue and MacDougal Street; currently home to the New York Studio School of Drawing, Painting and Sculpture.
Some 18th-century streets, such as Bedford Street (pictured), are narrow.
33 East 17th Street (NRHP)
The Cherry Lane Theatre is located in Greenwich Village.
66 Perry Street was featured in Sex and the City as Carrie Bradshaw's house.
Gershwin Hotel on East 27th Street
The annual Greenwich Village Halloween Parade is the world's largest Halloween parade.
NYPD 6th Precinct
Korea Way in Koreatown, as seen on 32nd Street, with ubiquitous street signage in Hangul (한글)
The Stonewall Inn, a designated U.S. National Historic Landmark and National Monument, as the site of the June 1969 Stonewall riots and the cradle of the modern gay rights movement.
West Village Post Office
A view of the Empire State Building from 33rd Street and Park Avenue Subway Station
Blue Note Jazz Club
Jefferson Market Library, once a courthouse, now serves as a branch of the New York Public Library.
Shops along Designers' Way
The Washington Square Arch, an unofficial icon of Greenwich Village and nearby New York University
Whitney Museum of American Art under construction in 2013
Mount Vernon Hotel Museum on East 61st Street
396-397 West Street at West 10th Street is a former hotel which dates from 1904, and is part of the Weehawken Street Historic District
Archdiocesan Cathedral of the Holy Trinity
Washington Mews in Greenwich Village; an NYU building can be seen in the background
120-130 East 80th Street, with three of the four East 80th Street Houses; the Astor House is on the left, the Whitney House on the right, and the Dillon House is between them.
Christopher Park, part of the Stonewall National Monument
112th Street East of Broadway
NYPD 6th Precinct
Butler Library
West Village Post Office
Jewish Theological Seminary
Jefferson Market Library, once a courthouse, now serves as a branch of the New York Public Library.
The Apollo Theater
Robert De Niro
Western end
Robert Downey Jr.
Underneath; unconnected
Hank Greenberg
East end of 181st Street
Emma Stone
West 187th Street stairs to Ft. Washington Avenue
90 Bedford Street, used for establishing shot in Friends

The West Village is a neighborhood in the western section of the larger Greenwich Village neighborhood of Lower Manhattan, New York City.

- West Village

Greenwich Village also contains several subsections, including the West Village west of Seventh Avenue and the Meatpacking District in the northwest corner of Greenwich Village.

- Greenwich Village

Although the numbered streets begin just north of East Houston Street in the East Village, they generally do not extend west into Greenwich Village, which already had established, named streets when the grid plan was laid out by the Commissioners' Plan of 1811.

- List of numbered streets in Manhattan

Because West 4th Street turns northward at Sixth Avenue, it intersects 10th, 11th, 12th and 13th Streets in the West Village.

- List of numbered streets in Manhattan

From 1797 until 1829, the bucolic village of Greenwich was the location of New York State's first penitentiary, Newgate Prison, on the Hudson River at what is now West 10th Street, near the Christopher Street pier.

- Greenwich Village

West 4th Street, formerly Asylum Street, crosses West 10th, 11th and 12th Streets, ending at an intersection with West 13th Street.

- West Village

2 related topics with Alpha

Overall

Looking east from Orchard Street

Houston Street

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Major east–west thoroughfare in Lower Manhattan in New York City.

Major east–west thoroughfare in Lower Manhattan in New York City.

Looking east from Orchard Street
Houston Street (1917) by George Luks
East Houston Street between Clinton and Suffolk Streets in the 1920s
Houston Street at Lafayette Street in 1974

Houston Street generally serves as the boundary between neighborhoods on the East Side of Manhattan—Alphabet City, the East Village, NoHo, Greenwich Village, and the West Village to the north, and the Lower East Side, most of the Bowery, Nolita, and SoHo to the south.

The numeric street-naming grid in Manhattan, created as part of the Commissioners' Plan of 1811, begins immediately north of Houston Street with 1st Street at Avenue A.

An 1893 redrawing of the 1807 version of the Commissioners' grid plan for Manhattan, a few years before it was adopted in 1811

Commissioners' Plan of 1811

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The original design for the streets of Manhattan above Houston Street and below 155th Street, which put in place the rectangular grid plan of streets and lots that has defined Manhattan on its march uptown until the current day.

The original design for the streets of Manhattan above Houston Street and below 155th Street, which put in place the rectangular grid plan of streets and lots that has defined Manhattan on its march uptown until the current day.

An 1893 redrawing of the 1807 version of the Commissioners' grid plan for Manhattan, a few years before it was adopted in 1811
The city blocks of Portland, Oregon; Savannah, Georgia; and Manhattan shown at the same scale
"A Portraiture of the City of Philadelphia" (1683) by Thomas Holme, the first map of the city.
A portion of a map of the city from 1776; De Lancey Square and the grid around it can be seen on the right
The Mangin–Goerck Plan of 1803; the "warning label" can be seen at the bottom under "Plan of the City of New York"
The only known image of John Randel Jr., the Commission's chief surveyor, by an unknown artist, probably Ezra Ames.
The park-like grounds of the American Museum of Natural Historycalled "Theodore Roosevelt Park" since 1958, but officially part of Central Parkis the only one of the planned public spaces of the Commissioners' Plan which still exists; it was to be "Manhattan Square".
This one of John Randel's survey bolts marked the location of what would have been Sixth Avenue and 65th Street; the location later became part of Central Park
One of Randel's 92 detailed "Farm Maps", showing how the Manhattan grid would sit on the island's topography and extant farms and homesteads. This one is bounded by West 36th Street, Sixth Avenue, West 15th Street, and the Hudson River.
William M. "Boss" Tweed (1870)
Central Park is by far the largest interruption of the Commissioners' grid, running from Central Park South (59th Street, at the right) to 110th Street (on the left), and from Fifth Avenue (at the top) to Central Park West (Eighth Avenue, at the bottom), and at 843 acre, taking up a little over 6% of the area of Manhattan island.
Andrew Haswell Green, a critic of the Commissioners' Plan, headed the Central Park Commission, which created the street plan for Manhattan above 155th Street
The Knapp map of 1870 shows the progress made in laying out streets above 155th Street as called for in the Central Park Commission's 1868 plan
In 1945, Sixth Avenue was officially renamed "Avenue of the Americas", and was adorned with circular signs for each member country of the Organization of American States, such as this one for Venezuela. The name never caught on with New Yorkers, though, who still insist on calling it "Sixth Avenue". After decades of requiring only one official name, the city at last began to co-sign the avenue with both names. Currently, "Avenue of the Americas" is generally only seen on business stationery and official city documents, or heard from the mouths of tourists.
Frederick Law Olmsted, vociferous critic of the Commissioners' Plan (c.1860)
Clement Clarke Moore objected to the Plan, but made a fortune developing his estate once the Plan's streets were laid down through it. (1897)
Henry James (1910)
Lewis Mumford, a vehement critic of the Commissioners' Plan
Thomas Janvier, an illustration from In Old New York (1894)
Jean-Paul Sartre (c.1950)
Dutch artist Piet Mondrian drew inspiration from the vibrancy of the grid, displaying it in paintings such as Broadway Boogie Woogie (1942).

There were a few interruptions in the grid for public spaces, such as the Grand Parade between 23rd Street and 33rd Street, which was the precursor to Madison Square Park, as well as four squares named Bloomingdale, Hamilton, Manhattan, and Harlem, a wholesale market complex, and a reservoir.

The Bayard streets still exist as the core of SoHo and part of Greenwich Village: Mercer, Greene, and Wooster Streets, LaGuardia Place/West Broadway (originally Laurens Street), and Thompson, Sullivan, MacDougal, and Hancock Streets, although the last has been subsumed by the extension of Sixth Avenue.

Greenwich Village, then independent of New York City, and the current West Village were not part of the area the Commission was to deal with.