The only known photograph taken during the first night of riots, by freelance photographer Joseph Ambrosini, shows gay youth scuffling with police.
MacDougal Street in Greenwich Village
Washington Square Park in Greenwich Village
453–461 Sixth Avenue in the Historic District
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The intersection of West 4th and West 12th Streets
Christopher Park, where many of the demonstrators met after the first night of rioting to talk about what had happened, now features a sculpture of four white figures by George Segal that commemorates the milestone.
Street signs at intersection of West 10th and West 4th Streets
Gay rights demonstration in Trafalgar Square, London, including members of the Gay Liberation Front (GLF). The GLF in the UK held its first meeting in a basement classroom at the London School of Economics on October 13, 1970. The organization was very informal, instituting marches and other activities, leading to the first British Gay Pride March in 1972.
Map of old Greenwich Village. A section of Bernard Ratzer's map of New York and its suburbs, made ca. 1766 for Henry Moore, royal governor of New York, when Greenwich was more than 2 miles (3 km) from the city.
Banner reading "Stonewall was a riot" pictured during Berlin Pride, 2009
Gay Street at the corner of Waverly Place; the street's name refers to a colonial family, not the LGBT character of Greenwich Village
Queer anarchists at Stockholm pride with banner reading "Remember Stonewall"
Whitney Museum of American Art's original location, at 8–12 West 8th Street, between Fifth Avenue and MacDougal Street; currently home to the New York Studio School of Drawing, Painting and Sculpture.
The Stonewall, a bar in part of the building where the Stonewall Inn was located. The building and the surrounding streets have been declared a National Historic Landmark.
The Cherry Lane Theatre is located in Greenwich Village.
The sign left by police following the raid is now on display just inside the entrance.
The annual Greenwich Village Halloween Parade is the world's largest Halloween parade.
A banner hanging from the top of the building the day after President Obama announced creation of the Stonewall National Monument
The Stonewall Inn, a designated U.S. National Historic Landmark and National Monument, as the site of the June 1969 Stonewall riots and the cradle of the modern gay rights movement.
Stonewall Day logo by Pride Live
Blue Note Jazz Club
Plaque commemorating the Stonewall Riots
The Washington Square Arch, an unofficial icon of Greenwich Village and nearby New York University
396-397 West Street at West 10th Street is a former hotel which dates from 1904, and is part of the Weehawken Street Historic District
Washington Mews in Greenwich Village; an NYU building can be seen in the background
Christopher Park, part of the Stonewall National Monument
NYPD 6th Precinct
West Village Post Office
Jefferson Market Library, once a courthouse, now serves as a branch of the New York Public Library.
Robert De Niro
Robert Downey Jr.
Hank Greenberg
Emma Stone
90 Bedford Street, used for establishing shot in Friends

The Stonewall riots (also known as the Stonewall uprising, Stonewall rebellion, or simply Stonewall) were a series of spontaneous protests by members of the gay community in response to a police raid that began in the early morning hours of June 28, 1969, at the Stonewall Inn in the Greenwich Village neighborhood of Lower Manhattan in New York City.

- Stonewall riots

In 1969, enraged members of the gay community, in search for equality, started the Stonewall riots.

- Greenwich Village

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Facade of Stonewall Inn during the 2016 Pride celebrations

Stonewall Inn

Facade of Stonewall Inn during the 2016 Pride celebrations
"Raided Premises" signs were commonly displayed in bars after police raids.
Stonewall Miami Beach before the fire
Plaque commemorating the Stonewall Riots

The Stonewall Inn, often shortened to Stonewall, is a gay bar and recreational tavern in the Greenwich Village neighborhood of Lower Manhattan, New York City, and the site of the Stonewall riots of 1969, which is widely considered to be the single most important event leading to the gay liberation movement and the modern fight for LGBT rights in the United States.

Manhattan

Most densely populated and geographically smallest of the five boroughs of New York City.

Most densely populated and geographically smallest of the five boroughs of New York City.

Peter Minuit, early 1600s
Pieter Schaghen's 1626 letter saying Manhattan was purchased for 60 guilders.
The Castello Plan showing the Dutch city of New Amsterdam in 1660, at the southern tip of Manhattan
Washington's statue in front of Federal Hall on Wall Street, where in 1789 he was sworn in as first U.S. president
Manhattan in 1873. The Brooklyn Bridge was under construction from 1870 until 1883
The "Sanitary & Topographical Map of the City and Island of New York", commonly known as the Viele Map, was created by Egbert Ludovicus Viele in 1865
Manhattan's Little Italy, Lower East Side, circa 1900
Manhattan personified, early 20th century
V-J Day in Times Square in Times Square, 1945
Flooding on Avenue C caused by Hurricane Sandy on October 29, 2012
Satellite image of Manhattan Island, bounded by the Hudson River to the west, the Harlem River to the north, the East River to the east, and New York Harbor to the south, with rectangular Central Park prominently visible. Roosevelt Island, in the East River, belongs to Manhattan.
Location of Manhattan (red) within New York City (remainder yellow)
Manhattan schist outcropping in Central Park
Liberty Island is an exclave of Manhattan, of New York City, and of New York State, that is surrounded by New Jersey waters
The Empire State Building in the foreground looking southward from the top of Rockefeller Center, with One World Trade Center in the background, at sunset. The Midtown South Community Council acts as a civic caretaker for much of the neighborhood between the skyscrapers of Midtown and Lower Manhattan.
Central Park in autumn
The Estonian House, the main center of Estonian culture amongst Estonian Americans
A. T. Stewart in 1870, 9th Street, Manhattan
Many tall buildings have setbacks on their facade due to the 1916 Zoning Resolution. This is exemplified at Park Avenue and 57th Street in Midtown Manhattan.
The New York Stock Exchange, by a significant margin the world's largest stock exchange per market capitalization of its listed companies, at US$23.1 trillion as of April 2018.
The Financial District of Lower Manhattan, seen from Brooklyn
The Flatiron District is the center and birthplace of Silicon Alley
Times Square is the hub of the Broadway theater district and a major cultural venue in Manhattan, it also has one of the highest annual attendance rates of any tourist attraction in the world, estimated at 50 million
The New York Times headquarters, 620 Eighth Avenue
Butler Library at Columbia University, with its notable architectural design
Stuyvesant High School, in Tribeca
New York Public Library Main Branch at 42nd Street and Fifth Avenue
Lincoln Center for the Performing Arts
The scene at Manhattan's 2015 LGBT Pride March. The annual event rivals the sister São Paulo event as the world's largest pride parade, attracting tens of thousands of participants and millions of sidewalk spectators each June.
The Metropolitan Museum of Art
Madison Square Garden is home to the Rangers and Knicks, and hosts some Liberty games
The Skating Pond in Central Park, 1862
Manhattan Municipal Building
James Farley Post Office
A slum tour through the Five Points in an 1885 sketch
Tenement houses in 1936
At the time of its construction, London Terrace in Chelsea was the largest apartment building in the world
Grand Central Terminal is a National Historic Landmark.
Ferries departing Battery Park City and helicopters flying above Manhattan
The Staten Island Ferry, seen from the Battery, crosses Upper New York Bay, providing free public transportation between Staten Island and Manhattan.
The Brooklyn Bridge to the right and the Manhattan Bridge towards the left, are two of the three bridges that connect Lower Manhattan with Brooklyn over the East River.
Eighth Avenue, looking northward ("Uptown"), in the rain; most streets and avenues in Manhattan's grid plan incorporate a one-way traffic configuration
Tourists looking westward at sunset to observe the July 12, 2016 Manhattanhenge
Ferry service departing Battery Park City towards New Jersey, see from Paulus Hook

Chinatown incorporates the highest concentration of Chinese people in the Western Hemisphere, and the Stonewall Inn in Greenwich Village, part of the Stonewall National Monument, is considered the birthplace of the modern gay rights movement.

Lower Manhattan

Southernmost part of Manhattan, the central borough for business, culture, and government in New York City.

Southernmost part of Manhattan, the central borough for business, culture, and government in New York City.

The pre-9/11 Lower Manhattan skyline in May 2001, seen from the Empire State Building. The skyline was dominated by The Twin Towers.
New Amsterdam, centered in the eventual Lower Manhattan, in 1664, the year England took control and renamed it "New York".
The Cooper Union at Astor Place, where Abraham Lincoln gave his famed Cooper Union speech, is one of the area's most storied buildings.
Photo of Lower Manhattan pictured in 1931
Peter Stuyvesant
View of New York harbor, ca. 1770
Norman Friend. Sidney's Map Twelve Miles Around New York, 1849. Chromo lithograph, Brooklyn Museum
View from the Woolworth Building in 1913
View from an airplane in 1981
The Stonewall Inn in Greenwich Village, a designated U.S. National Historic Landmark and National Monument, as the site of the June 1969 Stonewall riots and the cradle of the modern gay rights movement.
United Airlines Flight 175 hits the South Tower of the original World Trade Center on September 11, 2001.
Picture of Lower Manhattan skyline, including the One World Trade Center; taken from Little Island at Pier 55 in November 2021
Chinatown is home to the highest concentration of Chinese people in the Western Hemisphere.
The park and surrounding neighborhood of Union Square, located between 14th and 17th Streets, may be considered a part of either Lower or Midtown Manhattan.
The New York Stock Exchange, by a significant margin the world's largest stock exchange per market capitalization of its listed companies, at US$23.1 trillion as of April 2018. Pictured is the exchange's building on Wall Street.
New York City Hall in Lower Manhattan's Civic Center neighborhood

North of Canal Street and south of 14th Street are the neighborhoods of SoHo, the Meatpacking District, the West Village, Greenwich Village, Little Italy, Nolita, and the East Village.

The Stonewall riots were a series of spontaneous, violent demonstrations by members of the gay community against a police raid that took place in the early morning hours of June 28, 1969, at the Stonewall Inn in the Greenwich Village neighborhood of Lower Manhattan.

Gay liberation demonstration in 1970

Gay liberation

Social and political movement of the late 1960s through the mid-1980s that urged lesbians and gay men to engage in radical direct action, and to counter societal shame with gay pride.

Social and political movement of the late 1960s through the mid-1980s that urged lesbians and gay men to engage in radical direct action, and to counter societal shame with gay pride.

Gay liberation demonstration in 1970
Lower-case lambda, first used in 1970 as a symbol representing gay rights
Members of the Gay Liberation Front (GLF) during one of its street theatre performances in London
Two members of the anticapitalist Homosexual Liberation Front (Spanish: Frente de Liberación Homosexual, FLH) from Buenos Aires, Argentina, in 1971

The Stonewall Inn in the gay village of Greenwich Village, Manhattan, New York City, was the site of the June 1969 Stonewall riots, and became the cradle of the modern LGBT rights movement, and the subsequent gay liberation movement.

Stonewall Inn the day after President Obama's dedication on June 24, 2016

Stonewall National Monument

Stonewall Inn the day after President Obama's dedication on June 24, 2016
Christopher Park entrance
Stonewall National Monument sign at the entrance to Christopher Park

Stonewall National Monument is a 7.7 acre U.S. National Monument in the West Village neighborhood of Greenwich Village in Lower Manhattan, New York City.

The designated area includes the 0.19 acre Christopher Park and the block of Christopher Street bordering the park, which is directly across the street from the Stonewall Inn—the site of the Stonewall riots of June 28, 1969, widely regarded as the start of the modern LGBT rights movement in the United States.

The Village Voice

American news and culture paper, known for being the country's first alternative newsweekly.

American news and culture paper, known for being the country's first alternative newsweekly.

The Cooper Square offices of the paper
Cover of the October 1955 issue

The Village Voice was launched by Ed Fancher, Dan Wolf, and Norman Mailer on October 26, 1955, from a two-bedroom apartment in Greenwich Village; that was its initial coverage area, which expanded to other parts of the city by the 1960s.

While reporting on the Stonewall riots of 1969, the newspaper referred to the riots as "The Great Faggot Rebellion".

Dave Van Ronk performs at the 1968 Philadelphia Folk Festival.

Dave Van Ronk

American folk singer.

American folk singer.

Dave Van Ronk performs at the 1968 Philadelphia Folk Festival.

An important figure in the American folk music revival and New York City's Greenwich Village scene in the 1960s, he was nicknamed the "Mayor of MacDougal Street".

Van Ronk was among 13 people arrested at the Stonewall Inn June 28, 1969—the night of the Stonewall Riots, which is widely credited as the start of the gay rights movement.

Underwater atomic test "Baker", Bikini Atoll, Pacific Ocean, 1946

Counterculture of the 1960s

Anti-establishment cultural phenomenon that developed throughout much of the Western world between the mid-1960s and the mid-1970s.

Anti-establishment cultural phenomenon that developed throughout much of the Western world between the mid-1960s and the mid-1970s.

Underwater atomic test "Baker", Bikini Atoll, Pacific Ocean, 1946
Free Speech activist Mario Savio on the steps of Sproul Hall, University of California, Berkeley, 1966
King's "I Have a Dream" speech, given in front of the Lincoln Memorial during the 1963 March on Washington
A family watches television, c. 1958
Anti-war protesters
Carnaby Street, London, 1966
Oz number 31 cover
Three radical icons of the sixties. Encounter between Simone de Beauvoir, Jean-Paul Sartre and Ernesto "Che" Guevara in Cuba, in 1960
Yellow Power activist Richard Aoki at a Black Panther Party rally.
Herbert Marcuse, associated with the Frankfurt School of critical theory, was an influential libertarian socialist thinker on the radical student movements of the era and philosopher of the New Left
Eugene McCarthy, anti-war candidate for the Democratic nomination for the US presidency in 1968
A sign pointing to an old fallout shelter in New York City
The cover of an early Whole Earth Catalog shows the Earth as seen by astronauts traveling back from the Moon
Frisbee and alternative 1960s disc sports icon Ken Westerfield
A small part of the crowd of 400,000, after the rain, Woodstock, United States, August 1969
The Jimi Hendrix Experience performs for the Dutch television show Fenklup in March 1967
The Doors performing for Danish television in 1968
Recording "Give Peace a Chance". Left to right: Rosemary Leary (face not visible), Tommy Smothers (with back to camera), John Lennon, Timothy Leary, Yoko Ono, Judy Marcioni and Paul Williams, June 1, 1969.
The plaque honoring the victims of the August 1970 Sterling Hall bombing, University of Wisconsin, Madison.
A small segment of the "Wall" at the Vietnam Veterans Memorial listing the names of the nearly 60,000 American war dead
Jerry Rubin, University at Buffalo, March 10, 1970

The Stonewall riots were a series of spontaneous, violent demonstrations against a police raid that took place in the early morning hours of June 28, 1969, at the Stonewall Inn, a gay bar in the Greenwich Village neighborhood of New York City.