Greenwich Village

MacDougal Street in Greenwich Village
453–461 Sixth Avenue in the Historic District
The intersection of West 4th and West 12th Streets
Street signs at intersection of West 10th and West 4th Streets
Map of old Greenwich Village. A section of Bernard Ratzer's map of New York and its suburbs, made ca. 1766 for Henry Moore, royal governor of New York, when Greenwich was more than 2 miles (3 km) from the city.
Gay Street at the corner of Waverly Place; the street's name refers to a colonial family, not the LGBT character of Greenwich Village
Whitney Museum of American Art's original location, at 8–12 West 8th Street, between Fifth Avenue and MacDougal Street; currently home to the New York Studio School of Drawing, Painting and Sculpture.
The Cherry Lane Theatre is located in Greenwich Village.
The annual Greenwich Village Halloween Parade is the world's largest Halloween parade.
The Stonewall Inn, a designated U.S. National Historic Landmark and National Monument, as the site of the June 1969 Stonewall riots and the cradle of the modern gay rights movement.
Blue Note Jazz Club
The Washington Square Arch, an unofficial icon of Greenwich Village and nearby New York University
396-397 West Street at West 10th Street is a former hotel which dates from 1904, and is part of the Weehawken Street Historic District
Washington Mews in Greenwich Village; an NYU building can be seen in the background
Christopher Park, part of the Stonewall National Monument
NYPD 6th Precinct
West Village Post Office
Jefferson Market Library, once a courthouse, now serves as a branch of the New York Public Library.
Robert De Niro
Robert Downey Jr.
Hank Greenberg
Emma Stone
90 Bedford Street, used for establishing shot in Friends

Neighborhood on the west side of Lower Manhattan in New York City, bounded by 14th Street to the north, Broadway to the east, Houston Street to the south, and the Hudson River to the west.

- Greenwich Village

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New York University

Private research university in New York City.

Private research university in New York City.

Albert Gallatin (1761–1849) by Gilbert Stuart
NYU Building in Washington Square, 1850
The University Heights campus, now home to Bronx Community College
Washington Square Park, with its gateway arch, is surrounded largely by NYU buildings and plays an integral role in the university's campus life.
Bobst Library
Bern Dibner Library of Science and Technology on the Brooklyn campus
NYU Langone Health
NYU Abu Dhabi
NYU Shanghai
Washington Square Village, home to NYU faculty and graduate students
A bus system transports students to and from the far ends of campus.
Jack Dorsey, American billionaire and internet entrepreneur, founder and CEO of Twitter and Square, Inc.; CAS (dropped out)
Robert Muller III, American public official; lead director of the Special Counsel investigation, author of the Mueller Report, former Director of the Federal Bureau of Investigation; GSAS '67
Alan Greenspan, American economist and public official; former long-time Chairman of the Federal Reserve; Stern '48, '50, '77
Carol Bellamy, American politician; former executive director of the United Nations Children's Fund (UNICEF); Law '68
Ma Ying-jeou, Taiwanese politician; Former President of the Republic of China; Law '76
Jonas Salk, American biologist; creator of the polio vaccine; founder of the Salk Institute; Medicine '39
Martin Scorsese, American filmmaker, director and actor; AFI Life Achievement Award winner, 20-time Academy Award winner, 23-time BAFTA winner, 11-time Golden Globes winner; CAS '64, Steinhardt '68
Spike Lee, American filmmaker, director and producer; two-time Academy Award winner; two-time Emmy Award winner; Tisch '83
Ang Lee OBS, Taiwanese film director; three-time Academy Award winner; two-time Golden Lion winner; Tisch '83
Alan Menken, American composer, songwriter, and record producer; one of only sixteen people to have won an Oscar, an Emmy, a Grammy, and a Tony; Steinhart '71
Suzanne Collins, American television writer and author; Author of The New York Times best-selling series The Underland Chronicles and The Hunger Games trilogy; Tisch '89
Alec Baldwin, American actor, writer, comedian and philanthropist; three-time Emmy Award winner; three-time Golden Globe winner; Tisch '94
Lady Gaga, American singer, songwriter, and actress; nine-time Grammy Award winner; thirteen-time MTV Video Music Award winner; Tisch (dropped out)
Angelina Jolie, American actress and humanitarian; three-time Golden Globe Award winner; Special Envoy to the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees; Tisch (non-degree seeking)
Mahershala Ali, American actor; two-time Academy Award winner; Golden Globe Award winner; three-time Screen Actors Guild Award winner; Tisch '00
Woody Allen, American director, actor and comedian; four-time Academy Award winner; nine-time BAFTA Award winner; Tisch (dropped out)
Adam Sandler, American actor, director and comedian; five-time MTV Movie & TV Award winner; eight-time People's Choice Award winner; Tisch '88
Donald Glover, American actor, comedian, screenwriter, and singer; two-time Golden Globe Award winner; five-time Grammy Award winner; Tisch '06
Anne Hathaway, American actress; Academy Award and Golden Globe Award winner; Gallatin (dropped out)
Tom Ford, American fashion designer and filmmaker; former creative director at Gucci and Yves Saint Laurent; CAS (dropped out)

The university, in 1833, then moved and has maintained its main campus in Greenwich Village surrounding Washington Square Park.

Underwater atomic test "Baker", Bikini Atoll, Pacific Ocean, 1946

Counterculture of the 1960s

Anti-establishment cultural phenomenon that developed throughout much of the Western world between the mid-1960s and the mid-1970s.

Anti-establishment cultural phenomenon that developed throughout much of the Western world between the mid-1960s and the mid-1970s.

Underwater atomic test "Baker", Bikini Atoll, Pacific Ocean, 1946
Free Speech activist Mario Savio on the steps of Sproul Hall, University of California, Berkeley, 1966
King's "I Have a Dream" speech, given in front of the Lincoln Memorial during the 1963 March on Washington
A family watches television, c. 1958
Anti-war protesters
Carnaby Street, London, 1966
Oz number 31 cover
Three radical icons of the sixties. Encounter between Simone de Beauvoir, Jean-Paul Sartre and Ernesto "Che" Guevara in Cuba, in 1960
Yellow Power activist Richard Aoki at a Black Panther Party rally.
Herbert Marcuse, associated with the Frankfurt School of critical theory, was an influential libertarian socialist thinker on the radical student movements of the era and philosopher of the New Left
Eugene McCarthy, anti-war candidate for the Democratic nomination for the US presidency in 1968
A sign pointing to an old fallout shelter in New York City
The cover of an early Whole Earth Catalog shows the Earth as seen by astronauts traveling back from the Moon
Frisbee and alternative 1960s disc sports icon Ken Westerfield
A small part of the crowd of 400,000, after the rain, Woodstock, United States, August 1969
The Jimi Hendrix Experience performs for the Dutch television show Fenklup in March 1967
The Doors performing for Danish television in 1968
Recording "Give Peace a Chance". Left to right: Rosemary Leary (face not visible), Tommy Smothers (with back to camera), John Lennon, Timothy Leary, Yoko Ono, Judy Marcioni and Paul Williams, June 1, 1969.
The plaque honoring the victims of the August 1970 Sterling Hall bombing, University of Wisconsin, Madison.
A small segment of the "Wall" at the Vietnam Veterans Memorial listing the names of the nearly 60,000 American war dead
Jerry Rubin, University at Buffalo, March 10, 1970

The Stonewall riots were a series of spontaneous, violent demonstrations against a police raid that took place in the early morning hours of June 28, 1969, at the Stonewall Inn, a gay bar in the Greenwich Village neighborhood of New York City.

The only known photograph taken during the first night of riots, by freelance photographer Joseph Ambrosini, shows gay youth scuffling with police.

Stonewall riots

The only known photograph taken during the first night of riots, by freelance photographer Joseph Ambrosini, shows gay youth scuffling with police.
Washington Square Park in Greenwich Village
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Christopher Park, where many of the demonstrators met after the first night of rioting to talk about what had happened, now features a sculpture of four white figures by George Segal that commemorates the milestone.
Gay rights demonstration in Trafalgar Square, London, including members of the Gay Liberation Front (GLF). The GLF in the UK held its first meeting in a basement classroom at the London School of Economics on October 13, 1970. The organization was very informal, instituting marches and other activities, leading to the first British Gay Pride March in 1972.
Banner reading "Stonewall was a riot" pictured during Berlin Pride, 2009
Queer anarchists at Stockholm pride with banner reading "Remember Stonewall"
The Stonewall, a bar in part of the building where the Stonewall Inn was located. The building and the surrounding streets have been declared a National Historic Landmark.
The sign left by police following the raid is now on display just inside the entrance.
A banner hanging from the top of the building the day after President Obama announced creation of the Stonewall National Monument
Stonewall Day logo by Pride Live
Plaque commemorating the Stonewall Riots

The Stonewall riots (also known as the Stonewall uprising, Stonewall rebellion, or simply Stonewall) were a series of spontaneous protests by members of the gay community in response to a police raid that began in the early morning hours of June 28, 1969, at the Stonewall Inn in the Greenwich Village neighborhood of Lower Manhattan in New York City.

East Village, Manhattan

Neighborhood on the East Side of Lower Manhattan in New York City.

Neighborhood on the East Side of Lower Manhattan in New York City.

Stuyvesant Street, one of the neighborhood's oldest streets, in front of St. Mark's Church in-the-Bowery. This street served as the boundary between boweries 1 and 2, owned by Peter Stuyvesant.
Former German-American Shooting Society Clubhouse at 12 St Mark's Place (1885), part of Little Germany
The Village East Cinema/Louis N. Jaffe Theater was originally a Jewish theater
St. Nicholas Kirche at East 2nd Street, just west of Avenue A. The church and almost all buildings on the street were demolished in 1960 and replaced with parking lots for the Village View Houses
The Phyllis Anderson Theater, one of several theaters that were originally Yiddish theaters
A wall in the East Village in 1998, featuring a mural of two men
"Extra Place", an obscure side street off of East 1st Street, just east of the Bowery
East 5th Street between Second Avenue and Cooper Square is a typical side street in the heart of the East Village
Once synonymous with "Bowery Bums", the Bowery area has become a magnet for luxury condominiums as the East Village neighborhood's rapid gentrification continues
Taras Shevchenko Place, with St. George's Church on the north side, and St. George Academy on the south side.
1st Avenue, looking north at 10th Street
The Nuyorican Poets Café has been located off Avenue C and East 3rd Street since its founding in 1973.
The Bowery Poetry Club
Sherry Vine and Joey Arias during the 2009 HOWL! Festival
Tompkins Square Park is the recreational and geographic heart of the East Village. It has historically been a part of counterculture, protest and riots
A production of John Reed's All the World's a Grave in the New York Marble Cemetery, which does not contain headstones
Ladder Co. 3/Battalion 6
USPS Cooper Station post office
New York Public Library, Ottendorfer branch
Punk rock icon and writer Richard Hell still lives in the same apartment in Alphabet City that he has had since the 1970s
Miss Understood stops a bus in front of the Lucky Cheng's restaurant at 2nd Street on First Avenue.
Lotti Golden, Lower East Side, 1968
First Houses
Webster Hall
128 East 13th Street

In the 1950s and 1960s, the migration of Beatniks into the neighborhood later attracted hippies, musicians, writers, and artists who had been priced out of the rapidly gentrifying Greenwich Village.

Singer-songwriter Woody Guthrie emerged from the dust bowl of Oklahoma and the Great Depression in the mid-20th century, with lyrics that embraced his views on ecology, poverty, and unionization, paired with melody reflecting the many genres of American folk music.

American folk music revival

The American folk music revival began during the 1940s and peaked in popularity in the mid-1960s.

The American folk music revival began during the 1940s and peaked in popularity in the mid-1960s.

Singer-songwriter Woody Guthrie emerged from the dust bowl of Oklahoma and the Great Depression in the mid-20th century, with lyrics that embraced his views on ecology, poverty, and unionization, paired with melody reflecting the many genres of American folk music.
Pete Seeger entertaining Eleanor Roosevelt, honored guest at a racially integrated Valentine's Day party marking the opening of a canteen for the United Federal Workers of America, a trade union representing federal employees, in then-segregated Washington, D.C. Photographed by Joseph Horne for the Office of War Information, 1944.
The Kingston Trio in 1958
Woody Guthrie in 1943
Burl Ives in 1955
Pete Seeger in 1955
Josh White, Café Society (Downtown), New York, N.Y., c. June 1946
Harry Belafonte speaking at the 1963 Civil Rights March on Washington, D.C
Odetta, 1961
Joan Baez playing at the March on Washington in August 1963
Joan Baez and Bob Dylan at the March on Washington, 1963
Bob Dylan in November 1963
Peter, Paul and Mary
Judy Collins performing on The Smothers Brothers Comedy Hour, 1967
The Smothers Brothers in 1967

Barred from mainstream outlets, artists like Seeger were restricted to performing in schools and summer camps, and the folk-music scene became a phenomenon associated with vaguely rebellious bohemianism in places like New York (especially Greenwich Village) and San Francisco's North Beach, and in the college and university districts of cities like Chicago, Boston, Denver, and elsewhere.

Baez in 2016

Joan Baez

American singer, songwriter, musician, and activist.

American singer, songwriter, musician, and activist.

Baez in 2016
Baez playing at the March on Washington in August 1963
Baez at the Frankfurt Easter March 1966
Baez in 1966
Baez in 1966 at Amsterdam airport
Baez playing in Hamburg, 1973
Bob Dylan, Baez, and Carlos Santana, performing in 1984
Hardly Strictly Bluegrass Festival 2005 at Golden Gate Park
Joan Baez concert in Dresden, Germany, July 2008
Baez in 2003
Baez with Bob Dylan at the civil rights March on Washington, 1963

Baez first met Dylan in April 1961 at Gerde's Folk City in New York City's Greenwich Village.

Looking east from Orchard Street

Houston Street

Major east–west thoroughfare in Lower Manhattan in New York City.

Major east–west thoroughfare in Lower Manhattan in New York City.

Looking east from Orchard Street
Houston Street (1917) by George Luks
East Houston Street between Clinton and Suffolk Streets in the 1920s
Houston Street at Lafayette Street in 1974

Houston Street generally serves as the boundary between neighborhoods on the East Side of Manhattan—Alphabet City, the East Village, NoHo, Greenwich Village, and the West Village to the north, and the Lower East Side, most of the Bowery, Nolita, and SoHo to the south.

The front of the Museum (2019)

Whitney Museum

Art museum in the Meatpacking District and West Village neighborhoods of Manhattan in New York City.

Art museum in the Meatpacking District and West Village neighborhoods of Manhattan in New York City.

The front of the Museum (2019)
The front of the Museum (2019)
The Whitney's original location, at 8–12 West 8th Street, between Fifth Avenue and MacDougal Street in Greenwich Village
The Whitney Museum of American Art's former (1966–2014) home on Madison Avenue; the Marcel Breuer-designed building has seen numerous subsequent uses.
Entrance to the Whitney via the High Line
The Whitney Museum, New York City in 2016: The building was designed by Renzo Piano.
Gertrude Vanderbilt Whitney by Robert Henri (1916)
Banners from April 5, 2019, protest by Decolonize This Place at the Whitney Museum, New York NY, over board vice chair Warren Kanders' ownership of Safariland, a manufacturer of tear gas and other weapons
Theodore Robinson, Etude, (1890)
Maurice Prendergast, Central Park, 1900, (1900)
Robert Henri, Laughing Child, (1907)
Oscar Florianus Bluemner, Old Canal Port, (1914)
Thomas Hart Benton, House in Cubist Landscape, (c. 1915–1920)
George Luks, Armistice Night, (1918)
Edward Hopper, New York Interior, c. 1921
George Bellows, Dempsey and Firpo, (1924)

The Whitney Museum of American Art was founded in 1930; at this time architect Noel L. Miller was converting three row houses on West 8th Street in Greenwich Village—one of which, 8 West 8th Street had been the location of the Studio Club—to be the museum's home, as well as a residence for Whitney.

Lawrence Ferlinghetti

Beat Generation

Literary movement started by a group of authors whose work explored and influenced American culture and politics in the post-war era.

Literary movement started by a group of authors whose work explored and influenced American culture and politics in the post-war era.

Lawrence Ferlinghetti
A section devoted to the beat generation at a bookstore in Stockholm, Sweden

Beat writers and artists flocked to Greenwich Village in New York City in the late 1950s because of low rent and the "small town" element of the scene.

Union Square looking north from 14th Street (May 2010)

Union Square, Manhattan

Historic intersection and surrounding neighborhood in Manhattan, New York City, located where Broadway and the former Bowery Road – now Fourth Avenue – came together in the early 19th century.

Historic intersection and surrounding neighborhood in Manhattan, New York City, located where Broadway and the former Bowery Road – now Fourth Avenue – came together in the early 19th century.

Union Square looking north from 14th Street (May 2010)
Union Park New York (East side), New York Public Library
George Washington Statue at Union Square
Union Square in 1908
The renovated pavilion at the north end of the park in February 2011
W New York Union Square; the Everett Building can be seen at left
Mohandas Gandhi
The outdoor Greenmarket Farmers Market, held four days each week
The former Kellogg's cafe at Union Square; the AT&T Wireless store is underneath it and next to the entrance
Spectators watch as a street chess player plays bullet chess with a customer in Union Square.
{{center|Boy selling newspapers in Union Square, July 1910}}
{{center|The square in the blizzard of 2006}}
{{center|14th Street–Union Square station entrance}}
{{center|Metronome by Kristin Jones/Andrew Ginzel (1999)}}
{{center|Metronome revision by Andrew Boyd and Gan Golan (2020)}}
{{center|Union Square West (2011), including the Bank of the Metropolis Building and Decker Building, on the left (downtown) end of the block}}
{{center|Former Germania Life Insurance Company Building, now the W New York Union Square Hotel}}
{{center|Former Union Square Savings Bank, now the Daryl Roth Theatre}}
{{center|Zeckendorf Towers with the renovated north plaza of the park in the foreground, and the Con Ed Building in the background}}

Adjacent neighborhoods are the Flatiron District to the north, Chelsea to the west, Greenwich Village to the southwest, East Village to the southeast, and Gramercy Park to the east.