A report on Greenwich Village

MacDougal Street in Greenwich Village
453–461 Sixth Avenue in the Historic District
The intersection of West 4th and West 12th Streets
Street signs at intersection of West 10th and West 4th Streets
Map of old Greenwich Village. A section of Bernard Ratzer's map of New York and its suburbs, made ca. 1766 for Henry Moore, royal governor of New York, when Greenwich was more than 2 miles (3 km) from the city.
Gay Street at the corner of Waverly Place; the street's name refers to a colonial family, not the LGBT character of Greenwich Village
Whitney Museum of American Art's original location, at 8–12 West 8th Street, between Fifth Avenue and MacDougal Street; currently home to the New York Studio School of Drawing, Painting and Sculpture.
The Cherry Lane Theatre is located in Greenwich Village.
The annual Greenwich Village Halloween Parade is the world's largest Halloween parade.
The Stonewall Inn, a designated U.S. National Historic Landmark and National Monument, as the site of the June 1969 Stonewall riots and the cradle of the modern gay rights movement.
Blue Note Jazz Club
The Washington Square Arch, an unofficial icon of Greenwich Village and nearby New York University
396-397 West Street at West 10th Street is a former hotel which dates from 1904, and is part of the Weehawken Street Historic District
Washington Mews in Greenwich Village; an NYU building can be seen in the background
Christopher Park, part of the Stonewall National Monument
NYPD 6th Precinct
West Village Post Office
Jefferson Market Library, once a courthouse, now serves as a branch of the New York Public Library.
Robert De Niro
Robert Downey Jr.
Hank Greenberg
Emma Stone
90 Bedford Street, used for establishing shot in Friends

Neighborhood on the west side of Lower Manhattan in New York City, bounded by 14th Street to the north, Broadway to the east, Houston Street to the south, and the Hudson River to the west.

- Greenwich Village

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Union Square looking north from 14th Street (May 2010)

Union Square, Manhattan

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Historic intersection and surrounding neighborhood in Manhattan, New York City, located where Broadway and the former Bowery Road – now Fourth Avenue – came together in the early 19th century.

Historic intersection and surrounding neighborhood in Manhattan, New York City, located where Broadway and the former Bowery Road – now Fourth Avenue – came together in the early 19th century.

Union Square looking north from 14th Street (May 2010)
Union Park New York (East side), New York Public Library
George Washington Statue at Union Square
Union Square in 1908
The renovated pavilion at the north end of the park in February 2011
W New York Union Square; the Everett Building can be seen at left
Mohandas Gandhi
The outdoor Greenmarket Farmers Market, held four days each week
The former Kellogg's cafe at Union Square; the AT&T Wireless store is underneath it and next to the entrance
Spectators watch as a street chess player plays bullet chess with a customer in Union Square.
{{center|Boy selling newspapers in Union Square, July 1910}}
{{center|The square in the blizzard of 2006}}
{{center|14th Street–Union Square station entrance}}
{{center|Metronome by Kristin Jones/Andrew Ginzel (1999)}}
{{center|Metronome revision by Andrew Boyd and Gan Golan (2020)}}
{{center|Union Square West (2011), including the Bank of the Metropolis Building and Decker Building, on the left (downtown) end of the block}}
{{center|Former Germania Life Insurance Company Building, now the W New York Union Square Hotel}}
{{center|Former Union Square Savings Bank, now the Daryl Roth Theatre}}
{{center|Zeckendorf Towers with the renovated north plaza of the park in the foreground, and the Con Ed Building in the background}}

Adjacent neighborhoods are the Flatiron District to the north, Chelsea to the west, Greenwich Village to the southwest, East Village to the southeast, and Gramercy Park to the east.

Singer-songwriter Woody Guthrie emerged from the dust bowl of Oklahoma and the Great Depression in the mid-20th century, with lyrics that embraced his views on ecology, poverty, and unionization, paired with melody reflecting the many genres of American folk music.

American folk music revival

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The American folk music revival began during the 1940s and peaked in popularity in the mid-1960s.

The American folk music revival began during the 1940s and peaked in popularity in the mid-1960s.

Singer-songwriter Woody Guthrie emerged from the dust bowl of Oklahoma and the Great Depression in the mid-20th century, with lyrics that embraced his views on ecology, poverty, and unionization, paired with melody reflecting the many genres of American folk music.
Pete Seeger entertaining Eleanor Roosevelt, honored guest at a racially integrated Valentine's Day party marking the opening of a canteen for the United Federal Workers of America, a trade union representing federal employees, in then-segregated Washington, D.C. Photographed by Joseph Horne for the Office of War Information, 1944.
The Kingston Trio in 1958
Woody Guthrie in 1943
Burl Ives in 1955
Pete Seeger in 1955
Josh White, Café Society (Downtown), New York, N.Y., c. June 1946
Harry Belafonte speaking at the 1963 Civil Rights March on Washington, D.C
Odetta, 1961
Joan Baez playing at the March on Washington in August 1963
Joan Baez and Bob Dylan at the March on Washington, 1963
Bob Dylan in November 1963
Peter, Paul and Mary
Judy Collins performing on The Smothers Brothers Comedy Hour, 1967
The Smothers Brothers in 1967

Barred from mainstream outlets, artists like Seeger were restricted to performing in schools and summer camps, and the folk-music scene became a phenomenon associated with vaguely rebellious bohemianism in places like New York (especially Greenwich Village) and San Francisco's North Beach, and in the college and university districts of cities like Chicago, Boston, Denver, and elsewhere.

Gerde's Folk City

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Gerdes Folk City, sometimes spelled Gerde's Folk City, was a music venue in the West Village, part of Greenwich Village, Manhattan, in New York City.

The front of the Museum (2019)

Whitney Museum

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Art museum in the Meatpacking District and West Village neighborhoods of Manhattan in New York City.

Art museum in the Meatpacking District and West Village neighborhoods of Manhattan in New York City.

The front of the Museum (2019)
The front of the Museum (2019)
The Whitney's original location, at 8–12 West 8th Street, between Fifth Avenue and MacDougal Street in Greenwich Village
The Whitney Museum of American Art's former (1966–2014) home on Madison Avenue; the Marcel Breuer-designed building has seen numerous subsequent uses.
Entrance to the Whitney via the High Line
The Whitney Museum, New York City in 2016: The building was designed by Renzo Piano.
Gertrude Vanderbilt Whitney by Robert Henri (1916)
Banners from April 5, 2019, protest by Decolonize This Place at the Whitney Museum, New York NY, over board vice chair Warren Kanders' ownership of Safariland, a manufacturer of tear gas and other weapons
Theodore Robinson, Etude, (1890)
Maurice Prendergast, Central Park, 1900, (1900)
Robert Henri, Laughing Child, (1907)
Oscar Florianus Bluemner, Old Canal Port, (1914)
Thomas Hart Benton, House in Cubist Landscape, (c. 1915–1920)
George Luks, Armistice Night, (1918)
Edward Hopper, New York Interior, c. 1921
George Bellows, Dempsey and Firpo, (1924)

The Whitney Museum of American Art was founded in 1930; at this time architect Noel L. Miller was converting three row houses on West 8th Street in Greenwich Village—one of which, 8 West 8th Street had been the location of the Studio Club—to be the museum's home, as well as a residence for Whitney.

Looking south from near North Moore Street

Greenwich Street

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North–south street in the New York City borough of Manhattan.

North–south street in the New York City borough of Manhattan.

Looking south from near North Moore Street
753-57 Greenwich Street at West 11th Street
The corner of Greenwich and Barclay, facing East, near the destroyed World Trade Center after the September 11 attacks in 2001
Pacific Hotel, Greenwich Street, 1836

At that time it was called 'Road to Greenwich', as it was the only continuous road from Lower Manhattan to Greenwich Village other than Broadway.

Facade of Stonewall Inn during the 2016 Pride celebrations

Stonewall Inn

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Facade of Stonewall Inn during the 2016 Pride celebrations
"Raided Premises" signs were commonly displayed in bars after police raids.
Stonewall Miami Beach before the fire
Plaque commemorating the Stonewall Riots

The Stonewall Inn, often shortened to Stonewall, is a gay bar and recreational tavern in the Greenwich Village neighborhood of Lower Manhattan, New York City, and the site of the Stonewall riots of 1969, which is widely considered to be the single most important event leading to the gay liberation movement and the modern fight for LGBT rights in the United States.

Dave Van Ronk performs at the 1968 Philadelphia Folk Festival.

Dave Van Ronk

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American folk singer.

American folk singer.

Dave Van Ronk performs at the 1968 Philadelphia Folk Festival.

An important figure in the American folk music revival and New York City's Greenwich Village scene in the 1960s, he was nicknamed the "Mayor of MacDougal Street".

Judson Memorial Church

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The Judson Memorial Church is located on Washington Square South between Thompson Street and Sullivan Street, near Gould Plaza, opposite Washington Square Park, in the Greenwich Village neighborhood of the New York City borough of Manhattan.

Shops on east side of Greenwich Avenue

Greenwich Avenue

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Shops on east side of Greenwich Avenue
One Jackson Square at 122 Greenwich Avenue

Greenwich Avenue, formerly Greenwich Lane, is a southeast-northwest avenue located in the Greenwich Village neighborhood of Manhattan, New York City.

Paxton in 2000 (Washington, D.C.)

Tom Paxton

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American folk singer-songwriter who has had a music career spanning more than fifty years.

American folk singer-songwriter who has had a music career spanning more than fifty years.

Paxton in 2000 (Washington, D.C.)
Tom Paxton with Ralph McTell (left) in the Palace of Westminster in 2007

While attending the Clerk Typist School in Fort Dix, New Jersey, he began writing songs on his typewriter and spent almost every weekend visiting Greenwich Village in New York City during the emerging early 1960s folk revival.