Greenwich Village

MacDougal Street in Greenwich Village
453–461 Sixth Avenue in the Historic District
The intersection of West 4th and West 12th Streets
Street signs at intersection of West 10th and West 4th Streets
Map of old Greenwich Village. A section of Bernard Ratzer's map of New York and its suburbs, made ca. 1766 for Henry Moore, royal governor of New York, when Greenwich was more than 2 miles (3 km) from the city.
Gay Street at the corner of Waverly Place; the street's name refers to a colonial family, not the LGBT character of Greenwich Village
Whitney Museum of American Art's original location, at 8–12 West 8th Street, between Fifth Avenue and MacDougal Street; currently home to the New York Studio School of Drawing, Painting and Sculpture.
The Cherry Lane Theatre is located in Greenwich Village.
The annual Greenwich Village Halloween Parade is the world's largest Halloween parade.
The Stonewall Inn, a designated U.S. National Historic Landmark and National Monument, as the site of the June 1969 Stonewall riots and the cradle of the modern gay rights movement.
Blue Note Jazz Club
The Washington Square Arch, an unofficial icon of Greenwich Village and nearby New York University
396-397 West Street at West 10th Street is a former hotel which dates from 1904, and is part of the Weehawken Street Historic District
Washington Mews in Greenwich Village; an NYU building can be seen in the background
Christopher Park, part of the Stonewall National Monument
NYPD 6th Precinct
West Village Post Office
Jefferson Market Library, once a courthouse, now serves as a branch of the New York Public Library.
Robert De Niro
Robert Downey Jr.
Hank Greenberg
Emma Stone
90 Bedford Street, used for establishing shot in Friends

Neighborhood on the west side of Lower Manhattan in New York City, bounded by 14th Street to the north, Broadway to the east, Houston Street to the south, and the Hudson River to the west.

- Greenwich Village

213 related topics

Alpha

Financial District, Manhattan

Neighborhood located on the southern tip of Manhattan island in New York City.

Neighborhood located on the southern tip of Manhattan island in New York City.

Aerial view of the Financial District in 2009
1847 map showing the street layout and ferry routes for lower Manhattan
The Chamber of Commerce Building at 65 Liberty Street, one of many historical buildings in the district
The original city map of New Amsterdam, called the Castello Plan, from 1660 (the bottom left corner is approximately south, while the top right corner is approximately north) The fort eventually gave the name to The Battery, the large street leading from the fort later became known as Broadway, and the city wall (right) possibly gave the name to Wall Street.
The Twin Towers in March 2001
The Financial District area from Brooklyn. The South Street Seaport is at the lower middle, slightly to the right. Circa 2006
Leadership and Public Service High School
The Broad Street facade of the New York Stock Exchange
The Federal Reserve Bank of New York Building
The former House of Morgan building at 23 Wall Street
Federal Hall, once the U.S. Custom House, now a museum, with the towers of Wall Street behind it
One Liberty Plaza, one of the many modern skyscrapers in the area

As of 2017, the median household income in Community Districts 1 and 2 (including Greenwich Village and SoHo) was $144,878, though the median income in the Financial District individually was $125,565.

Pete Seeger entertaining Eleanor Roosevelt (center), at a racially integrated Valentine's Day party.

Folk rock

Hybrid music genre that combines the elements of folk and rock music, which arose in the United States, Canada, and the United Kingdom in the mid-1960s.

Hybrid music genre that combines the elements of folk and rock music, which arose in the United States, Canada, and the United Kingdom in the mid-1960s.

Pete Seeger entertaining Eleanor Roosevelt (center), at a racially integrated Valentine's Day party.
Bob Dylan was the most influential of all the urban folk-protest songwriters.
Bob Dylan in 1963.
Folk rock musicians Simon & Garfunkel performing in Dublin
Simon Nicol and Ric Sanders of Fairport Convention performing at Fairport's Cropredy Convention 2005
Merle Haggard and others influenced the sound of artists such as Bob Dylan, Ian and Sylvia, and the Byrds who adopted the sound of country music in the late 1960s.
John Renbourn in 2005

While this urban folk revival flourished in many cities, New York City, with its burgeoning Greenwich Village coffeehouse scene and population of topical folk singers, was widely regarded as the centre of the movement.

Facade of Stonewall Inn during the 2016 Pride celebrations

Stonewall Inn

Facade of Stonewall Inn during the 2016 Pride celebrations
"Raided Premises" signs were commonly displayed in bars after police raids.
Stonewall Miami Beach before the fire
Plaque commemorating the Stonewall Riots

The Stonewall Inn, often shortened to Stonewall, is a gay bar and recreational tavern in the Greenwich Village neighborhood of Lower Manhattan, New York City, and the site of the Stonewall riots of 1969, which is widely considered to be the single most important event leading to the gay liberation movement and the modern fight for LGBT rights in the United States.

West Fourth Street–Washington Square station

Tile caption below trim line
Street stair

The West Fourth Street–Washington Square station is an express station and transfer stop on the IND Sixth Avenue and IND Eighth Avenue Lines of the New York City Subway, located at the intersection of West Fourth Street and Sixth Avenue (Avenue of the Americas) in Greenwich Village, Manhattan.

West Village from MacDougal Street

Gerde's Folk City

West Village from MacDougal Street

Gerdes Folk City, sometimes spelled Gerde's Folk City, was a music venue in the West Village, part of Greenwich Village, Manhattan, in New York City.

Edna St. Vincent Millay, photographed by Carl Van Vechten, 1933

Edna St. Vincent Millay

American lyrical poet and playwright.

American lyrical poet and playwright.

Edna St. Vincent Millay, photographed by Carl Van Vechten, 1933
Edna St. Vincent Millay in Mamaroneck, New York, 1914, by Arnold Genthe.
Edna St. Vincent Millay's home in 1923–24 at 75 1⁄2 Bedford Street, Greenwich Village (2013 photo)
Main house at Steepletop, where Millay spent the last 25 years of her life
Edna St. Vincent Millay's (and her husband's) gravestone at Steepletop
Edna St. Vincent Millay by pond, 1914, by Arnold Genthe.
Undated Edna St. Vincent Millay Portrait

Millay was a prominent social figure of New York City's Greenwich Village just as it was becoming known as a bohemian writer's colony, and she was noted for her uninhibited lifestyle, forming many passing relationships with both men and women.

Hendrix performing on the Dutch television show Hoepla in 1967

Jimi Hendrix

American guitarist, singer, and songwriter.

American guitarist, singer, and songwriter.

Hendrix performing on the Dutch television show Hoepla in 1967
Hendrix's paternal grandparents, Ross and Nora Hendrix, pre-1912
Hendrix in the US Army, 1961
The Experience in 1968
Hendrix on stage at Gröna Lund in Stockholm, Sweden in June 1967
Hendrix on May 10, 1968
Author Michael Heatley wrote: "The iconic image by Ed Caraeff of Hendrix summoning the flames higher with his fingers will forever conjure up memories of Monterey for those who were there and the majority of us who weren't."
The white building (left) is 23 Brook Street; the building on the right is the Handel House Museum.
Hendrix flashed a peace sign at the start of his performance of "The Star-Spangled Banner" at Woodstock, August 18, 1969.
The Samarkand Hotel, where Hendrix spent his final hours
A 1968 King Vox-Wah wah-wah pedal similar to the one owned by Hendrix
Hendrix statue outside Dimbola Lodge, Isle of Wight

Feeling restricted by his experiences as an R&B sideman, Hendrix moved in 1966 to New York City's Greenwich Village, which had a vibrant and diverse music scene.

Young people near the Woodstock music festival in August 1969

Hippie

Someone associated with the counterculture of the 1960s, originally a youth movement that began in the United States during the mid-1960s and spread to other countries around the world.

Someone associated with the counterculture of the 1960s, originally a youth movement that began in the United States during the mid-1960s and spread to other countries around the world.

Young people near the Woodstock music festival in August 1969
Contemporary hippie at the Rainbow Gathering in Russia, 2005
A hippie-painted Volkswagen Beetle
American tourists in Thailand, the early 1970s
– Grateful Dead, lyrics from "That's It for the Other One"
Junction of Haight and Ashbury Streets, San Francisco, celebrated as the central location of the Summer of Love
Swami Satchidananda giving the opening talk at the Woodstock Festival of 1969
A group of hippies in Tallinn, 1989
Couple attending Snoqualmie Moondance Festival, August 1993
Tie-dyed clothes, associated with hippie culture
A 1967 VW Kombi bus decorated with hand-painting
Monument to the hippie era. Tamil Nadu, India
Oz number 28, also known as the "Schoolkids issue of Oz", which was the main cause of a 1971 high-profile obscenity case in the United Kingdom. Oz was a UK underground publication with a general hippie / counter-cultural point of view.
Hand-crafted Hippie Truck, 1968
Hippie Truck interior
Timothy Leary, family and band on a lecture tour at State University of New York at Buffalo in 1969
An anti-war demonstrator offers a flower to a Military Police officer during the National Mobilization Committee to End the War in Vietnam's 1967 March on the Pentagon
Tahquitz Canyon, Palm Springs, California, 1969, sharing a joint
As a hippie, Ken Westerfield helped to popularize the alternative sport of Frisbee in the 1960s–70s, that has become today's disc sports
Hippies at the Nambassa 1981 Festival in New Zealand
Goa Gil, original 1960s hippie who later became a pioneering electronic dance music DJ and party organizer, here appearing in the 2001 film Last Hippie Standing

The word hippie came from hipster and was used to describe beatniks who moved into New York City's Greenwich Village, San Francisco's Haight-Ashbury district, and Chicago's Old Town community.

Pierre-Auguste Renoir, The Bohemian (or Lise the Bohemian), 1868, oil on canvas, Berlin, Germany: Alte Nationalgalerie

Bohemianism

Practice of an unconventional lifestyle, often in the company of like-minded people and with few permanent ties.

Practice of an unconventional lifestyle, often in the company of like-minded people and with few permanent ties.

Pierre-Auguste Renoir, The Bohemian (or Lise the Bohemian), 1868, oil on canvas, Berlin, Germany: Alte Nationalgalerie
Bohemian Grove during the summer Hi-Jinks, circa 1911–1916
Gelett Burgess drew this fanciful "Map of Bohemia" for The Lark, March 1, 1896 (see also )
An illustration from Henri Murger's 1899 book Bohemian Life.
Former brewery turned artist center in Prenzlauer Berg

Maxwell Bodenheim, an American poet and novelist, was known as the king of Greenwich Village Bohemians during the 1920s and his writing brought him international fame during the Jazz Age.

Lewis Wharf, first home of the Provincetown Players in 1915

Provincetown Players

Collective of artists, writers, intellectuals, and amateur theater enthusiasts.

Collective of artists, writers, intellectuals, and amateur theater enthusiasts.

Lewis Wharf, first home of the Provincetown Players in 1915
Setting up the stage for Bound East for Cardiff, Fall 1916. Photo shows O'Neill on the ladder, Cook to the far right.
Scene in All God's Chillun Got Wings in which Paul Robeson kissed Mary Blair's hand, attracting national interest.
Susan Glaspell, playwright and one of the founders of the Provincetown Players.

Provincetown, Massachusetts had become a popular summer outpost for numerous artists and writers, bohemian residents from Greenwich Village, New York.