A report on Greenwich Village

MacDougal Street in Greenwich Village
453–461 Sixth Avenue in the Historic District
The intersection of West 4th and West 12th Streets
Street signs at intersection of West 10th and West 4th Streets
Map of old Greenwich Village. A section of Bernard Ratzer's map of New York and its suburbs, made ca. 1766 for Henry Moore, royal governor of New York, when Greenwich was more than 2 miles (3 km) from the city.
Gay Street at the corner of Waverly Place; the street's name refers to a colonial family, not the LGBT character of Greenwich Village
Whitney Museum of American Art's original location, at 8–12 West 8th Street, between Fifth Avenue and MacDougal Street; currently home to the New York Studio School of Drawing, Painting and Sculpture.
The Cherry Lane Theatre is located in Greenwich Village.
The annual Greenwich Village Halloween Parade is the world's largest Halloween parade.
The Stonewall Inn, a designated U.S. National Historic Landmark and National Monument, as the site of the June 1969 Stonewall riots and the cradle of the modern gay rights movement.
Blue Note Jazz Club
The Washington Square Arch, an unofficial icon of Greenwich Village and nearby New York University
396-397 West Street at West 10th Street is a former hotel which dates from 1904, and is part of the Weehawken Street Historic District
Washington Mews in Greenwich Village; an NYU building can be seen in the background
Christopher Park, part of the Stonewall National Monument
NYPD 6th Precinct
West Village Post Office
Jefferson Market Library, once a courthouse, now serves as a branch of the New York Public Library.
Robert De Niro
Robert Downey Jr.
Hank Greenberg
Emma Stone
90 Bedford Street, used for establishing shot in Friends

Neighborhood on the west side of Lower Manhattan in New York City, bounded by 14th Street to the north, Broadway to the east, Houston Street to the south, and the Hudson River to the west.

- Greenwich Village

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Stonewall Inn the day after President Obama's dedication on June 24, 2016

Stonewall National Monument

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Stonewall Inn the day after President Obama's dedication on June 24, 2016
Stonewall Inn the day after President Obama's dedication on June 24, 2016
Christopher Park entrance
Stonewall National Monument sign at the entrance to Christopher Park

Stonewall National Monument is a 7.7 acre U.S. National Monument in the West Village neighborhood of Greenwich Village in Lower Manhattan, New York City.

West Fourth Street–Washington Square station

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Tile caption below trim line
Street stair

The West Fourth Street–Washington Square station is an express station and transfer stop on the IND Sixth Avenue and IND Eighth Avenue Lines of the New York City Subway, located at the intersection of West Fourth Street and Sixth Avenue (Avenue of the Americas) in Greenwich Village, Manhattan.

The Gaslight Cafe

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The Gaslight Cafe was a coffeehouse in the Greenwich Village neighborhood of Manhattan, New York.

Cotton Club (125th Street in New York City in December 2013) helped inspire Josephson's Café Society.

Barney Josephson

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Cotton Club (125th Street in New York City in December 2013) helped inspire Josephson's Café Society.
Billie Holiday (circa 1947) at the Downbeat club, New York (February 1947) debuted "Strange Fruit" at Café Society in 1939
William Gropper's cover for the first-ever issue of the New Masses
Nellie Lutcher (1950) performed at Café Society
Zero Mostel (in Fiddler on the Roof 1964) got his start with Josephson as a comedian at Café Society
Big Joe Turner (here, performing in Hamburg in 1973) performed in Josephson's establishments for decades

Barney Josephson (1902–1988) was the founder of Café Society in Greenwich Village, New York's first integrated nightclub.

Bleecker Street near the corner of Sullivan Street

Bleecker Street

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East–west street in the New York City borough of Manhattan.

East–west street in the New York City borough of Manhattan.

Bleecker Street near the corner of Sullivan Street
LeRoy Place, south side of Bleecker Street, drawn in 1831. After 1852, the economic status of the area declined and these aristocratic buildings were all demolished by 1875.
The Bayard–Condict Building at 65 Bleecker Street
Our Lady of Pompeii Church
The James Roosevelt House at 58 Bleecker Street
The Village Gate at Thompson and Bleecker Streets
Margaret Sanger Square, at the intersection of Mott Street and Bleecker Street in Manhattan
Florence Crittenton Mission, 21 Bleecker Street, 1893
177 Bleecker Street. In Marvel Comics, 177A Bleecker Street is the location of Doctor Strange's Sanctum Sanctorum.

It is most famous today as a Greenwich Village nightclub district.

The church in 2015

Church of St. Luke in the Fields

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Episcopal church located at 487 Hudson Street between Christopher and Barrow Streets at the intersection of Grove Street in the West Village neighborhood of Manhattan, New York City.

Episcopal church located at 487 Hudson Street between Christopher and Barrow Streets at the intersection of Grove Street in the West Village neighborhood of Manhattan, New York City.

The church in 2015
Historic American Buildings Survey photo of the Chapel of St. Luke in the Fields (1934)
A close-up of the tower

Both are located within the Greenwich Village Historic District, designated in 1969.

Jacobs as chair of a Greenwich Village civic group at a 1961 press conference

Jane Jacobs

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American-Canadian journalist, author, theorist, and activist who influenced urban studies, sociology, and economics.

American-Canadian journalist, author, theorist, and activist who influenced urban studies, sociology, and economics.

Jacobs as chair of a Greenwich Village civic group at a 1961 press conference
Cover of The Death and Life of Great American Cities
Jacobs fought to prevent Washington Square Park, pictured, from being demolished for a highway
Jacobs lived at 69 Albany Avenue (white porch) in Toronto's Annex for 35 years
Jacobs with Ecotrust foreman Spencer Beebe in Portland, Oregon, 2004
A "Jane's Walk" group pauses at Fort York National Historic Site in Toronto

Jacobs organized grassroots efforts to protect neighborhoods from urban renewal and slum clearance – in particular plans by Robert Moses to overhaul her own Greenwich Village neighborhood.

Financial District, Manhattan

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Neighborhood located on the southern tip of Manhattan island in New York City.

Neighborhood located on the southern tip of Manhattan island in New York City.

Aerial view of the Financial District in 2009
1847 map showing the street layout and ferry routes for lower Manhattan
The Chamber of Commerce Building at 65 Liberty Street, one of many historical buildings in the district
The original city map of New Amsterdam, called the Castello Plan, from 1660 (the bottom left corner is approximately south, while the top right corner is approximately north) The fort eventually gave the name to The Battery, the large street leading from the fort later became known as Broadway, and the city wall (right) possibly gave the name to Wall Street.
The Twin Towers in March 2001
The Financial District area from Brooklyn. The South Street Seaport is at the lower middle, slightly to the right. Circa 2006
Leadership and Public Service High School
The Broad Street facade of the New York Stock Exchange
The Federal Reserve Bank of New York Building
The former House of Morgan building at 23 Wall Street
Federal Hall, once the U.S. Custom House, now a museum, with the towers of Wall Street behind it
One Liberty Plaza, one of the many modern skyscrapers in the area

As of 2017, the median household income in Community Districts 1 and 2 (including Greenwich Village and SoHo) was $144,878, though the median income in the Financial District individually was $125,565.

The Village Voice

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American news and culture paper, known for being the country's first alternative newsweekly.

American news and culture paper, known for being the country's first alternative newsweekly.

The Cooper Square offices of the paper
Cover of the October 1955 issue

The Village Voice was launched by Ed Fancher, Dan Wolf, and Norman Mailer on October 26, 1955, from a two-bedroom apartment in Greenwich Village; that was its initial coverage area, which expanded to other parts of the city by the 1960s.

Land of the Blacks (Manhattan)

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Village settled by people of African descent north of the wall of New Amsterdam from about 1643 to 1716.

Village settled by people of African descent north of the wall of New Amsterdam from about 1643 to 1716.

There were about 30 African-owned farms over about 130 acres centered in the modern neighborhoods of Greenwich Village and SoHo, including all of the area surrounding Washington Square Park.