A report on Greenwich Village

MacDougal Street in Greenwich Village
453–461 Sixth Avenue in the Historic District
The intersection of West 4th and West 12th Streets
Street signs at intersection of West 10th and West 4th Streets
Map of old Greenwich Village. A section of Bernard Ratzer's map of New York and its suburbs, made ca. 1766 for Henry Moore, royal governor of New York, when Greenwich was more than 2 miles (3 km) from the city.
Gay Street at the corner of Waverly Place; the street's name refers to a colonial family, not the LGBT character of Greenwich Village
Whitney Museum of American Art's original location, at 8–12 West 8th Street, between Fifth Avenue and MacDougal Street; currently home to the New York Studio School of Drawing, Painting and Sculpture.
The Cherry Lane Theatre is located in Greenwich Village.
The annual Greenwich Village Halloween Parade is the world's largest Halloween parade.
The Stonewall Inn, a designated U.S. National Historic Landmark and National Monument, as the site of the June 1969 Stonewall riots and the cradle of the modern gay rights movement.
Blue Note Jazz Club
The Washington Square Arch, an unofficial icon of Greenwich Village and nearby New York University
396-397 West Street at West 10th Street is a former hotel which dates from 1904, and is part of the Weehawken Street Historic District
Washington Mews in Greenwich Village; an NYU building can be seen in the background
Christopher Park, part of the Stonewall National Monument
NYPD 6th Precinct
West Village Post Office
Jefferson Market Library, once a courthouse, now serves as a branch of the New York Public Library.
Robert De Niro
Robert Downey Jr.
Hank Greenberg
Emma Stone
90 Bedford Street, used for establishing shot in Friends

Neighborhood on the west side of Lower Manhattan in New York City, bounded by 14th Street to the north, Broadway to the east, Houston Street to the south, and the Hudson River to the west.

- Greenwich Village

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Portrait of O'Neill by Alice Boughton

Eugene O'Neill

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American playwright and Nobel laureate in literature.

American playwright and Nobel laureate in literature.

Portrait of O'Neill by Alice Boughton
Portrait of O'Neill as a child, c. 1893
Birthplace plaque (1500 Broadway, northeast corner of 43rd and Broadway, New York City), presented by Circle in the Square.
O'Neill's first play, Bound East for Cardiff, premiered at this theatre on a wharf in Provincetown, Massachusetts.
Time Cover, March 17, 1924
O'Neill in the mid-1930s. He received the Nobel Prize in Literature in 1936
The Chaplins and six of their eight children in 1961. From left to right: Geraldine, Eugene, Victoria, Chaplin, Oona O'Neill, Annette, Josephine and Michael.
Grave of Eugene O'Neill
O'Neill stamp issued in 1967
Statue of O'Neil as a boy, sitting and writing, overlooking the harbor of New London, Connecticut

During the 1910s O'Neill was a regular on the Greenwich Village literary scene, where he also befriended many radicals, most notably Communist Labor Party of America founder John Reed.

Richard Barone at Carnegie Hall, New York City, October 1, 2008

Richard Barone

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American rock musician who first gained attention as frontman for the Bongos.

American rock musician who first gained attention as frontman for the Bongos.

Richard Barone at Carnegie Hall, New York City, October 1, 2008
Tony Visconti and Richard Barone in the studio, circa 2000.
Richard Barone (right) with Moby in the studio mixing the Bongos in 2006. Photo by Brian T. Silak.
Matthew Billy and Richard Barone on the set of the "Hey, Can I Sleep On Your Futon?" video in April 2012.
Al Jardine and Richard Barone recording Pete Seeger's "If I Had A Hammer (The Hammer Song)" in June 2013.
Richard Barone advocates for the Music Modernization Act (MMA), speaking here with Senator Patrick Leahy in April 2018, Washington D.C.

It was Tiny Tim who first suggested to Barone that he should live in Greenwich Village, where Tim himself had gotten his start.

The Tank, an off-off-Broadway theater in Manhattan

Off-off-Broadway

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Off-off-Broadway theaters are smaller New York City theaters than Broadway and off-Broadway theaters, and usually have fewer than 100 seats.

Off-off-Broadway theaters are smaller New York City theaters than Broadway and off-Broadway theaters, and usually have fewer than 100 seats.

The Tank, an off-off-Broadway theater in Manhattan

Among the first venues for what would soon be called "off-off-Broadway" theatre were coffeehouses in Greenwich Village, particularly the Caffe Cino at 31 Cornelia Street, operated by the eccentric Joe Cino, who early on took a liking to actors and playwrights and agreed to let them stage plays there without bothering to read the plays first, or to even find out much about the content.

The south face of the arch

Washington Square Arch

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The south face of the arch
The north face of the Washington Square Arch
South face of the Washington Arch at night
George Washington as Commander-in-Chief (1914–1916) by Hermon A. MacNeil
George Washington as President (1917–1918) by Alexander Stirling Calder

The Washington Square Arch, officially the Washington Arch, is a marble memorial arch in Washington Square Park, in the Greenwich Village neighborhood of Lower Manhattan, New York City.

Elizabeth Seton Building at 151-167 West 11th St

Saint Vincent's Catholic Medical Centers

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Healthcare system, anchored by its flagship hospital, St. Vincent's Hospital Manhattan, locally referred to as "St. Vincent's".

Healthcare system, anchored by its flagship hospital, St. Vincent's Hospital Manhattan, locally referred to as "St. Vincent's".

Elizabeth Seton Building at 151-167 West 11th St
Elizabeth Seton Building at 151-167 West 11th St
The Manhattan complex in 1979
Main Entrance of St. Vincent's Hospital (1900), Greenwich Village, New York City

St. Vincent's was founded in 1849 and was a major teaching hospital in the Greenwich Village neighborhood of Manhattan, New York City.

The Lovin' Spoonful in 1965. Clockwise from below: John Sebastian, Zal Yanovsky, Joe Butler and Steve Boone

The Lovin' Spoonful

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American rock band popular during the mid- to late-1960s.

American rock band popular during the mid- to late-1960s.

The Lovin' Spoonful in 1965. Clockwise from below: John Sebastian, Zal Yanovsky, Joe Butler and Steve Boone

The band had its roots in the folk music scene based in the Greenwich Village section of lower Manhattan during the early 1960s.

Burroughs in the 1980s

William S. Burroughs

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American writer and visual artist, widely considered a primary figure of the Beat Generation and a major postmodern author who influenced popular culture and literature.

American writer and visual artist, widely considered a primary figure of the Beat Generation and a major postmodern author who influenced popular culture and literature.

Burroughs in the 1980s
William S. Burroughs' childhood home on Pershing Place in St. Louis
William S. Burroughs and James Grauerholz in the alley behind the Jazzhaus in Lawrence, Kansas (1996)
Burroughs and David Woodard with Brion Gysin Dreamachine, 1997

He visited lesbian dives, piano bars, and the Harlem and Greenwich Village homosexual underground with Richard Stern, a wealthy friend from Kansas City.

circa 1909

Gertrude Vanderbilt Whitney

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American sculptor, art patron and collector, and founder in 1931 of the Whitney Museum of American Art in New York City.

American sculptor, art patron and collector, and founder in 1931 of the Whitney Museum of American Art in New York City.

circa 1909
Gertrude, 13 years of age. (John Everett Millais, 1888)
Gertrude Vanderbilt Whitney in her studio, ca. 1920
Mrs. Cornelius Vanderbilt, II and her daughters, Gladys and Gertrude, having tea in the library at the Breakers Newport, Rhode Island, William Bruce Ellis Ranken, 1932
Robert Henri, Gertrude Vanderbilt Whitney, 1916
Gertrude Vanderbilt Whitney, in Vogue magazine, by Adolf de Meyer, January 15, 1917
Chateau Thierry
His Last Charge
Found
Engineers
John
Salome
Gwendolyn
Mother and Child
Untitled
Sketch
Victory Arch, one of two bronze reliefs, New York City
Washington Heights-Inwood War Memorial (World War I), New York City
Titanic Memorial, Washington, D.C.
Buffalo Bill - The Scout, Cody, Wyoming
Monument to the Discovery Faith, Huelva, Spain
The Three Graces, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec, Canada
The Founders of the Daughters of the American Revolution, Washington, D.C.
A.E.F. Memorial, Saint-Nazaire, France
Peter Stuyvesant, New York City
Aztec fountain, Pan American Union Building, Washington, D.C.
Fountain of El Dorado, detail, 1915 Panama-Pacific Exposition

In 1907, Whitney established an apartment and studio in Greenwich Village.

The Village Gate Sign still adorns the corner of Thompson and Bleecker Streets.

Village Gate

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The Village Gate Sign still adorns the corner of Thompson and Bleecker Streets.

The Village Gate was a nightclub at the corner of Thompson and Bleecker Streets in Greenwich Village, New York.

Left to right: Paul Stookey, Peter Yarrow, and Mary Travers, c. 1968

Peter, Paul and Mary

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American folk group formed in New York City in 1961, during the American folk music revival phenomenon.

American folk group formed in New York City in 1961, during the American folk music revival phenomenon.

Left to right: Paul Stookey, Peter Yarrow, and Mary Travers, c. 1968
The trio performing at the 1963 Civil Rights March on Washington, D.C.
Peter, Paul and Mary in 2006

After rehearsing Yarrow, Stookey and Travers out of town in Boston and Miami, Grossman booked them into The Bitter End, a coffee house, nightclub and popular folk music venue in New York City's Greenwich Village.