Grenadier Guards

1st Foot Guards1st Regiment of Foot GuardsGrenadierFirst Regiment of Foot Guards1st GuardsFirst Foot Guards1st1st Battalion, Grenadier Guards1st Regiment of Footguards1st Foot Guard
The Grenadier Guards (GREN GDS) is an infantry regiment of the British Army.wikipedia
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Honourable Artillery Company

HAC11th Regiment, Royal Horse Artillery (Honourable Artillery Company)13th Regiment, Royal Horse Artillery (Honourable Artillery Company)
The Grenadier Guards trace their lineage back to 1656, when Lord Wentworth's Regiment was raised in Bruges, in the Spanish Netherlands (present-day Flanders), from gentlemen of the Honourable Artillery Company by the then heir to the throne, Prince Charles (later King Charles II) where it formed a part of exiled King's bodyguard.
In the 17th century, its members played a significant part in the formation of both the Royal Marines and the Grenadier Guards.

Coldstream Guards

2nd Foot GuardsColdstreamColdstream Regiment of Foot Guards
Although the Coldstream Guards were formed before the Grenadier Guards, the regiment is ranked after the Grenadiers in seniority as, having been a regiment of the New Model Army, the Coldstream Guards served the Crown for four fewer years than the Grenadiers (the Grenadiers having formed as a Royalist regiment in exile in 1656 and the Coldstream Guards having sworn allegiance to the Crown upon the Restoration in 1660). The 1st and 2nd Battalions were serving in the 7th Guards Brigade, which also included the 1st Battalion, Coldstream Guards, and were part of the 3rd Infantry Division, led by Major General Bernard Montgomery.
The regiment was placed as the second senior regiment of Household Troops, as it entered the service of the Crown after the 1st Regiment of Foot Guards, but it answered to that by adopting the motto Nulli Secundus (Second to None), due to the fact that the regiment is older than the senior regiment.

Infantry

infantry regimentinfantrymanP.
The Grenadier Guards (GREN GDS) is an infantry regiment of the British Army.
These names can persist long after the weapon speciality; examples of infantry units that retained such names are the Royal Irish Fusiliers and the Grenadier Guards.

British Army order of precedence

order of precedenceseniorBritish Army's order of precedence
It is the most senior regiment of the Guards Division and, as such, is the most senior regiment of infantry.

Honi soit qui mal y pense

Hony soit qui maly pence
Grenadier Guards' buttons are equally spaced and embossed with the Royal Cypher reversed and interlaced surrounded by the Royal Garter bearing the royal motto Honi soit qui mal y pense (May he be shamed who thinks badly of it).
British Army: the Royal Horse Artillery; Household Cavalry Regiment; Life Guards (motto appears in the Garter Star representation worn on Life Guard officer's helmets rather than in the unit badge); Blues and Royals; Grenadier Guards*; Coldstream Guards; Princess of Wales's Royal Regiment; Royal Regiment of Fusiliers; Royal Engineers; and the Royal Logistic Corps (which in April 1993 became an amalgamation of the trades of five corps, which included the Royal Corps of Transport the Royal Army Ordnance Corps, The Royal Pioneer Corps, the Army Catering Corps and the Postal and Courier Services of the Royal Engineers, all of these forming Corps used the motto inscribed garter in their badge).

Battle of Belmont (1899)

BelmontBattle of BelmontBelmont and Graspan
During the Second Boer War, the 2nd and 3rd Battalions were deployed to South Africa where they took part in a number of battles including the Battle of Modder River and the Battle of Belmont, as well as a number of smaller actions.
Methuen sent the Guards Brigade on a night march to outflank the Boers, but due to faulty maps the Grenadier Guards found themselves in front of the Boer position instead.

1st Infantry Division (United Kingdom)

1st Division1st Infantry DivisionBritish 1st Infantry Division
The 3rd Battalion was in the 1st Guards Brigade attached to the 1st Infantry Division, commanded by Major General Harold Alexander.
1/1st Foot Guards

Guards Division

GuardsGuards RegimentFoot Guards
It is the most senior regiment of the Guards Division and, as such, is the most senior regiment of infantry.
1st and 2nd Battalions, Grenadier Guards

Guards Armoured Division

British Guards Armoured DivisionGuardsGuards Armoured
The 1st and 2nd (Armoured) Battalions were part of the 5th Guards Armoured Brigade, attached to the Guards Armoured Division, and the 4th Battalion was part of the 6th Guards Tank Brigade Group.
The division was created in the United Kingdom on 17 June 1941 during World War II from elements of the Guards units, the Grenadier Guards, Coldstream Guards, Scots Guards, Irish Guards.

Anglo-Egyptian War

1882 Anglo-Egyptian WarEgyptian WarEgypt 1882
Following this they were involved in the fighting at Battle of Tel el-Kebir during the Anglo-Egyptian War in 1882, and then the Mahdist War in Sudan, where its main involvement came at the Battle of Omdurman.
2nd Battalion, Grenadier Guards

William Sidney, 1st Viscount De L'Isle

William SidneyLord De L'IsleViscount De L'Isle
They were Lance Corporal Harry Nicholls of the 3rd Battalion, during the Battle of Dunkirk, and Major William Sidney of the 5th Battalion during the Battle of Anzio in March 1944.
During the Second World War, Sidney served with the Grenadier Guards in France and Italy; he was awarded the Victoria Cross in 1944 for his actions in the Battle of Anzio.

Welsh Guards

1st Battalion, Welsh Guards1 WGBritish Army
In February 1915, a fifth Guards regiment was raised, known as The Welsh Guards.
It will alternate this role with the Grenadier Guards.

Harry Nicholls

They were Lance Corporal Harry Nicholls of the 3rd Battalion, during the Battle of Dunkirk, and Major William Sidney of the 5th Battalion during the Battle of Anzio in March 1944.
He was born on 21 April 1915 and was 25 years old, and a lance-corporal in the 3rd Battalion, Grenadier Guards, British Army during the Second World War when the following deed took place during the Battle of France for which he was awarded the VC.

Grenade

hand grenadegrenadeshand grenades
Modern Grenadier Guardsmen wear a cap badge of a "grenade fired proper" with seventeen flames.
The British Grenadier Guards took their name and cap badge of a burning grenade from repelling an attack of French Grenadiers at Waterloo.

Guards Division (United Kingdom)

Guards DivisionGuardsUK Guards Division
A short time later, permission was received for the formation of the Guards Division, the brainchild of Lord Kitchener, and on 18 August 1915, the division came into existence, consisting of three brigades, each with four battalions.
4th Battalion, Grenadier Guards from the 3rd Guards Brigade.

Battle of Anzio

AnzioAnzio beachheadAnzio landings
They were Lance Corporal Harry Nicholls of the 3rd Battalion, during the Battle of Dunkirk, and Major William Sidney of the 5th Battalion during the Battle of Anzio in March 1944. The battalions took part in the Italian Campaign at Salerno, Monte Camino, Anzio, Monte Cassino, and along the Gothic Line.
5th Battalion, Grenadier Guards

1st Armoured Infantry Brigade (United Kingdom)

1st Guards Brigade1st (Guards) Brigade1st Armoured Infantry Brigade
The 3rd Battalion was in the 1st Guards Brigade attached to the 1st Infantry Division, commanded by Major General Harold Alexander.
3rd Battalion, Grenadier Guards

3rd Division (United Kingdom)

3rd Division3rd Infantry Division3rd Armoured Division
The 1st and 2nd Battalions were serving in the 7th Guards Brigade, which also included the 1st Battalion, Coldstream Guards, and were part of the 3rd Infantry Division, led by Major General Bernard Montgomery.

22nd Guards Brigade

201st Guards Brigade201st Guards Motor Brigade200th Guards Brigade
The 6th Battalion served with the 22nd Guards Brigade, later redesignated 201st Guards Motor Brigade, until late 1944 when the battalion was disbanded due to an acute shortage of Guards replacements.
The brigade was reformed, as the 201st Guards Brigade, under the command of Brigadier Julian Gascoigne in Egypt on 14 August 1942 and spent the next few months training there, before being sent to Syria in September where it trained as a motorised infantry brigade, with each of the battalions (the 6th Grenadier Guards, fresh from England, and 3rd Coldstream Guards and 2nd Scots Guards, both veterans) composed of only three rifle companies.

Battle of Dunkirk

Dunkirkretreat to DunkirkSt Omer-La Bassée
They were Lance Corporal Harry Nicholls of the 3rd Battalion, during the Battle of Dunkirk, and Major William Sidney of the 5th Battalion during the Battle of Anzio in March 1944. As the BEF was pushed back by the German blitzkrieg during the battles of France and Dunkirk, these battalions played a considerable role in maintaining the British Army's reputation during the withdrawal phase of the campaign before being themselves evacuated from Dunkirk.
This was to be spearheaded by two battalions, the 3rd Grenadier Guards and 2nd North Staffordshire Regiment, both of Major-General Harold Alexander's 1st Division.

Lord Wentworth's Regiment

English foot regimentKing's Royal Regiment of GuardsRoyal Regiment of Guards
The Grenadier Guards trace their lineage back to 1656, when Lord Wentworth's Regiment was raised in Bruges, in the Spanish Netherlands (present-day Flanders), from gentlemen of the Honourable Artillery Company by the then heir to the throne, Prince Charles (later King Charles II) where it formed a part of exiled King's bodyguard.
In 1665, the regiment was amalgamated with John Russell's Regiment of Guards to form the 1st Regiment of Foot Guards.

24th Infantry Brigade (United Kingdom)

24th Guards Brigade24th Airmobile Brigade24th Brigade
The 5th Battalion was part of 24th Guards Brigade and served with the 1st Division during the Battle of Anzio.
5th Battalion, Grenadier Guards (from 5 June 1942 until 28 March 1945)

John Russell's Regiment of Guards

King's Royal Regt of GuardsLife Guard of Foot
A few years later, a similar regiment known as John Russell's Regiment of Guards was formed.
Upon the death of Lord Wentworth in 1665, the two regiments were amalgamated into the 1st Regiment of Foot Guards.

British Expeditionary Force (World War II)

British Expeditionary ForceBEFExpeditionary Force
The Grenadier Guards' first involvement in the war came in the early stages of the fighting when all three regular battalions were sent to France in late 1939 as part of the British Expeditionary Force (BEF).
Brooke ordered a counter-attack led by the 3rd Battalion, Grenadier Guards and the 2nd Battalion, North Staffordshire Regiment of the 1st Division.

7th Infantry Brigade and Headquarters East

7th Infantry Brigade7th Brigade7th Guards Brigade
The 1st and 2nd Battalions were serving in the 7th Guards Brigade, which also included the 1st Battalion, Coldstream Guards, and were part of the 3rd Infantry Division, led by Major General Bernard Montgomery.
1st Battalion, Grenadier Guards