Grimoire

grimoiresblack bookbook of spellsspell bookbooks of arcane literatureGramaryeGrimmeriegrimoiricinstructions about magicinstructions on how to summon demons
A grimoire (also known as a “book of spells”) is a textbook of magic, typically including instructions on how to create magical objects like talismans and amulets, how to perform magical spells, charms and divination, and how to summon or invoke supernatural entities such as angels, spirits, deities and demons.wikipedia
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Evocation

conjurationconjurersummon
A grimoire (also known as a “book of spells”) is a textbook of magic, typically including instructions on how to create magical objects like talismans and amulets, how to perform magical spells, charms and divination, and how to summon or invoke supernatural entities such as angels, spirits, deities and demons.
In contemporary western esotericism, the magic of the grimoires is frequently seen as the classical example of this idea.

Ceremonial magic

ritual magicmagicianceremonial magician
While the term grimoire is originally European and many Europeans throughout history, particularly ceremonial magicians and cunning folk, have used grimoires, the historian Owen Davies noted that similar books can be found all across the world, ranging from Jamaica to Sumatra.
Popularized by the Hermetic Order of the Golden Dawn, it draws on such schools of philosophical and occult thought as Hermetic Qabalah, Enochian magic, Thelema, and the magic of various grimoires.

Cunning folk

cunning womancunning mancunning women
While the term grimoire is originally European and many Europeans throughout history, particularly ceremonial magicians and cunning folk, have used grimoires, the historian Owen Davies noted that similar books can be found all across the world, ranging from Jamaica to Sumatra.
Many Norwegian and Danish practitioners of folk magic and medicine would have a copy of the "Svartebok" (or "black book"), a tome that, according to some, was written by Cyprianus, that is, the Saint of Necromancers, Cyprian of Antioch, and by others to have been the Sixth and Seventh books of the Bible (or "Books of Moses" as the Pentateuch is known in Denmark and Norway) that were left out of the official Old Testament by the learned so that the common folk would not learn the knowledge held within the text.

Magic (supernatural)

magicsorcerymagical
A grimoire (also known as a “book of spells”) is a textbook of magic, typically including instructions on how to create magical objects like talismans and amulets, how to perform magical spells, charms and divination, and how to summon or invoke supernatural entities such as angels, spirits, deities and demons.
Medieval Europe also saw magic come to be associated with the Old Testament figure of Solomon; various grimoires, or books outlining magical practices, were written that claimed to have been written by Solomon, most notably the Key of Solomon.

Sefer Raziel HaMalakh

Book of RazielSefer RazielBook of Raziel (Sefer Raziel HaMalakh)
Another was the Hebrew Sefer Raziel Ha-Malakh, translated in Europe as the Liber Razielis Archangeli.
Sefer Raziel HaMalakh, (Hebrew,ספר רזיאל המלאך, "the book of Raziel the angel"), is a grimoire of Practical Kabbalah from the Middle Ages written primarily in Hebrew and Aramaic.

Magical Treatise of Solomon

A later book also claiming to have been written by Solomon was originally written in Greek during the 15th century, where it was known as the Magical Treatise of Solomon or the Little Key of the Whole Art of Hygromancy, Found by Several Craftsmen and by the Holy Prophet Solomon.
The Magical Treatise of Solomon, sometimes known as Hygromanteia or Hygromancy of Solomon, the Solomonikê, or even Little Key of the Whole Art of Hygromancy, Found by Several Craftsmen and by the Holy Prophet Solomon, refers to a group of similar late Byzantine-era grimoires purporting to contain Solomon's instructions to his son Rehoboam on various magical techniques and tools to summon and control different spirits, those spirits' powers, astrological beliefs, select charms, different means of divination, and the magical uses of herbs.

The Sworn Book of Honorius

Liber JuratusGrimoire of HonoriusSworn Book of Honorius
The 13th-century Sworn Book of Honorius, for instance, was (like the ancient Testament of Solomon before it) largely based on the supposed teachings of the Biblical king Solomon and included ideas such as prayers and a ritual circle, with the mystical purpose of having visions of God, Hell, and Purgatory and gaining much wisdom and knowledge as a result.
The Sworn Book of Honorius, or Liber Juratus Honorii in Latin (also Liber Sacer/Sacratus/Consecratus, often confused with the Grimoire of Pope Honorius), is a medieval grimoire purportedly written by Honorius of Thebes.

Key of Solomon

The Key of SolomonClavicula SalomonisThe Greater Key of Solomon
In the 16th century, this work had been translated into Latin and Italian, being renamed the Clavicula Salomonis, or the Key of Solomon. In the late 19th century, several of these texts (including The Book of Abramelin and the Key of Solomon) were reclaimed by para-Masonic magical organisations, such as the Hermetic Order of the Golden Dawn and the Ordo Templi Orientis.
The Key of Solomon (Latin: Clavicula Salomonis, Hebrew: Mafteah Shelomoh [מפתח שלמה]) is a pseudepigraphical grimoire (also known as a book of spells) attributed to King Solomon.

Magic circle

casting a Circlesacred circlea ritual area
The 13th-century Sworn Book of Honorius, for instance, was (like the ancient Testament of Solomon before it) largely based on the supposed teachings of the Biblical king Solomon and included ideas such as prayers and a ritual circle, with the mystical purpose of having visions of God, Hell, and Purgatory and gaining much wisdom and knowledge as a result.
Circles may or may not be physically marked out on the ground, and a variety of elaborate patterns for circle markings can be found in grimoires and magical manuals, often involving angelic and divine names.

Pseudomonarchia Daemonum

De praestigiis daemonum
The idea of demonology had remained strong in the Renaissance, and several demonological grimoires were published, including The Fourth Book of Occult Philosophy, which falsely claimed to having been authored by Agrippa, and the Pseudomonarchia Daemonum, which listed 69 demons.
An abridgement of a grimoire similar in nature to the Ars Goetia, the first book of The Lesser Key of Solomon, it contains a list of demons, and the appropriate hours and rituals to conjure them.

Solomon

King SolomonSalomonSchlomo
The 13th-century Sworn Book of Honorius, for instance, was (like the ancient Testament of Solomon before it) largely based on the supposed teachings of the Biblical king Solomon and included ideas such as prayers and a ritual circle, with the mystical purpose of having visions of God, Hell, and Purgatory and gaining much wisdom and knowledge as a result. Israelite King Solomon was a Biblical figure associated with magic and sorcery in the ancient world.
The former appears in the title of the Lesser Key of Solomon, a grimoire whose framing story is Solomon capturing demons using his ring, and forcing them to explain themselves to him.

Petit Albert

Many grimoires published through this circulated among an ever-growing percentage of the populace, in particular the Grand Albert, the Petit Albert (1782), the Grimoire du Pape Honorius and the Enchiridion Leonis Papae.
Petit Albert (English: Lesser Albert) is an 18th-century grimoire of natural and cabalistic magic.

Demon

demonsevil spiritevil spirits
A grimoire (also known as a “book of spells”) is a textbook of magic, typically including instructions on how to create magical objects like talismans and amulets, how to perform magical spells, charms and divination, and how to summon or invoke supernatural entities such as angels, spirits, deities and demons.
The ceremonial magician usually consults a grimoire, which gives the names and abilities of demons as well as detailed instructions for conjuring and controlling them.

Grand Grimoire

The Grand GrimoireThe Red Dragon
In the late 18th and early 19th centuries, following the French Revolution of 1789, a hugely influential grimoire was published under the title of the Grand Grimoire, which was considered particularly powerful, because it involved conjuring and making a pact with the devil's chief minister, Lucifugé Rofocale, to gain wealth from him.
The Grand Grimoire is a black magic grimoire.

Black Pullet

black hen
Similar books published in France at the time included the Black Pullet and the Grimoirium Verum.
The Black Pullet (original French: La poule noire) also known in French as “la poule aux œufs d’or” (the hen that lays golden eggs) is a grimoire that proposes to teach the "science of magical talismans and rings", including the art of necromancy and Kabbalah.

Grimorium Verum

Grimoirium Verum
Similar books published in France at the time included the Black Pullet and the Grimoirium Verum.
The Grimorium Verum (Latin for True Grimoire) is an 18th-century grimoire attributed to one "Alibeck the Egyptian" of Memphis, who purportedly wrote in 1517.

Grimoire of Pope Leo

Enchiridion Leonis Papae
Many grimoires published through this circulated among an ever-growing percentage of the populace, in particular the Grand Albert, the Petit Albert (1782), the Grimoire du Pape Honorius and the Enchiridion Leonis Papae.
The Grimoire of Pope Leo or Enchiridion of Pope Leo is a French grimoire (a textbook of magic) that is falsely attributed to Pope Leo III.

Sixth and Seventh Books of Moses

Another scholar of the time interested in grimoires, the antiquarian bookseller Johann Scheible, first published the Sixth and Seventh Books of Moses, two influential magical texts that claimed to have been written by the ancient Jewish figure Moses.
Self-described as "the wonderful arts of the old Hebrews, taken from the Mosaic books of the cabala and the Talmud," it is actually a grimoire, or text of magical incantations and seals, that purports to instruct the reader in the spells used to create some of the miracles portrayed in the Bible as well as to grant other forms of good fortune and good health.

Cyprianus

black books
The Sixth and Seventh Books of Moses were among the works that later spread to the countries of Scandinavia, where, in Danish and Swedish, grimoires were known as black books and were commonly found among members of the army.
Cyprianus is a name given in Scandinavian traditions of folk magic to the "black book" ("Svarteboken"): a grimoire or manuscript collection of spells; and by extension to the magical tradition that these spells form a part of.

Demonology

demonologistdemonologistsdemonological
The idea of demonology had remained strong in the Renaissance, and several demonological grimoires were published, including The Fourth Book of Occult Philosophy, which falsely claimed to having been authored by Agrippa, and the Pseudomonarchia Daemonum, which listed 69 demons. These grimoires dealt in such topics as necromancy, divination and demonology.
Some texts such as the Lesser Key of Solomon or The Grimoire of Pope Honorius (although these, the earliest manuscripts, were from well after these individuals had died) are written with instructions on how to summon demons in the name of God and often were claimed to have been written by individuals respected within the Church.

Simon Necronomicon

NecronomiconSimonSimon ''Necronomicon
A modern grimoire, the Simon Necronomicon, takes its name from a fictional book of magic in the stories of H. P. Lovecraft, inspired by Babylonian mythology and by the "Ars Goetia", a section in the Lesser Key of Solomon that concerns the summoning of demons.
The Simon Necronomicon is a purported grimoire written by an unknown author, with an introduction by a man identified only as "Simon".

Lesser Key of Solomon

The Lesser Key of SolomonArs GoetiaLemegeton
A modern grimoire, the Simon Necronomicon, takes its name from a fictional book of magic in the stories of H. P. Lovecraft, inspired by Babylonian mythology and by the "Ars Goetia", a section in the Lesser Key of Solomon that concerns the summoning of demons.
The Lesser Key of Solomon, also known as Clavicula Salomonis Regis or Lemegeton, is an anonymous grimoire (or spell book) on demonology.

Necronomicon

Necronomicon Ex-MortisThe NecronomiconAl-Azif
The most famous fictional grimoire is the Necronomicon, a creation of H. P. Lovecraft.
The Necronomicon is a fictional grimoire (textbook of magic) appearing in stories by the horror writer H. P. Lovecraft and his followers.

The Book of Abramelin

The Book of the Sacred Magic of Abramelin the MageAbramelinThe Book of the Sacred Magic of Abra-Melin the Mage
In the late 19th century, several of these texts (including The Book of Abramelin and the Key of Solomon) were reclaimed by para-Masonic magical organisations, such as the Hermetic Order of the Golden Dawn and the Ordo Templi Orientis.
The grimoire is framed as a sort of epistolary novel or autobiography in which Abraham of Worms describes his journey from Germany to Egypt and reveals Abramelin's magical and Kabbalistic secrets to his son Lamech.

Johann Georg Faust

FaustJohann FaustDoctor Johann Faust
A third such individual was Johann Georg Faust, upon whom several pieces of later literature were written, such as Christopher Marlowe's Doctor Faustus, that portrayed him as consulting with demons.
There are several prints of grimoires or magical texts attributed to Faust.