Groundwater recharge

rechargegroundwater replenishmentaquifer rechargepercolationdeep drainagedeep percolationaquifer recharge areasartificially rechargeddrainedGroundwater is recharged
Groundwater recharge or deep drainage or deep percolation is a hydrologic process where water moves downward from surface water to groundwater.wikipedia
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Groundwater

ground waterunderground waterground
Groundwater recharge or deep drainage or deep percolation is a hydrologic process where water moves downward from surface water to groundwater. Tree roots increase water saturation into groundwater reducing water runoff.
Groundwater is recharged from and eventually flows to the surface naturally; natural discharge often occurs at springs and seeps, and can form oases or wetlands.

Reclaimed water

recycled waterwater reclamationwater recycling
Recharge occurs both naturally (through the water cycle) and through anthropogenic processes (i.e., "artificial groundwater recharge"), where rainwater and or reclaimed water is routed to the subsurface.
Reuse may include irrigation of gardens and agricultural fields or replenishing surface water and groundwater (i.e., groundwater recharge).

Overdrafting

groundwater depletionwater exploitationgroundwater extraction
Artificial groundwater recharge is becoming increasingly important in India, where over-pumping of groundwater by farmers has led to underground resources becoming depleted.
Since every groundwater basin recharges at a different rate depending upon precipitation, vegetative cover and soil conservation practises, the quantity of groundwater that can be safely pumped varies greatly among regions of the world and even within provinces.

Aquifer

aquifersaquitardunconfined aquifer
Recharge is the primary method through which water enters an aquifer.
Aquifers in surface irrigated areas in semi-arid zones with reuse of the unavoidable irrigation water losses percolating down into the underground by supplemental irrigation from wells run the risk of salination.

Vadose zone

vadoseunsaturated zonesaturated
This process usually occurs in the vadose zone below plant roots and is often expressed as a flux to the water table surface.
Groundwater recharge, which is an important process that refills aquifers, generally occurs through the vadose zone from precipitation.

Soil

dirtsoilssoil moisture
Tree roots increase water saturation into groundwater reducing water runoff.
Flooding temporarily increases soil permeability in river beds, helping to recharge aquifers.

Wetland

wetlandscoastal wetlandwetland habitat
Wetlands help maintain the level of the water table and exert control on the hydraulic head (O'Brien 1988; Winter 1988).
Wetland systems that are made of permeable sediments like limestone or occur in areas with highly variable and fluctuating water tables especially have a role in groundwater replenishment or water recharge.

Water table

watertablegroundwater tableperched lake
This process usually occurs in the vadose zone below plant roots and is often expressed as a flux to the water table surface.
Groundwater recharge

Prairie Pothole Region

prairie potholeprairie potholespothole
Groundwater recharge is typical in small wetlands such as prairie potholes, which can contribute significantly to recharge of regional groundwater resources (Weller 1981).
Shorter-duration wetlands fed only by precipitation typically are sources of groundwater recharge.

Retention basin

retention pondflood retention basinretention
However, where and when water tables are high this affects appropriate design of detention ponds, retention ponds and rain gardens.
Wet ponds are frequently used for water quality improvement, groundwater recharge, flood protection, aesthetic improvement or any combination of these.

Aquifer storage and recovery

aquifer storageASRrecharge projects
In 2007, on the recommendations of the International Water Management Institute, the Indian government allocated to fund dug-well recharge projects (a dug-well is a wide, shallow well, often lined with concrete) in 100 districts within seven states where water stored in hard-rock aquifers had been over-exploited.
Groundwater recharge

Evapotranspiration

potential evapotranspirationevaporationevapotranspired
Rates of groundwater recharge are difficult to quantify since other related processes, such as evaporation, transpiration (or evapotranspiration) and infiltration processes must first be measured or estimated to determine the balance.
The input is precipitation (P) and the outgoes are evapotranspiration (which is to be estimated), streamflow (Q), and groundwater recharge (D). If the change in storage, precipitation, streamflow, and groundwater recharge are all estimated, the missing flux, ET, can be estimated by rearranging the above equation as follows:

Rainwater harvesting

water harvestingrain water harvestingrainwater collection
Rainwater harvesting
Its uses include water for gardens, livestock, irrigation, domestic use with proper treatment, indoor heating for houses, etc. The harvested water can also be used as drinking water, longer-term storage, and for other purposes such as groundwater recharge.

Impervious surface

impervious surfacesimperviousimpermeable surfaces
Impervious surfaces
The pavement materials seal the soil surface, eliminating rainwater infiltration and natural groundwater recharge. From a recent article in the Seattle Times: "While urban areas cover only 3 percent of the U.S., it is estimated that their runoff is the primary source of pollution in 13 percent of rivers, 18 percent of lakes and 32 percent of estuaries."

Rain garden

rain gardensraingardenraingardens
However, where and when water tables are high this affects appropriate design of detention ponds, retention ponds and rain gardens.
Depression-focused recharge of polluted water into wells poses a serious threat and should be avoided.

Groundwater model

groundwater modelingComputer modelsgroundwater salinity models
Groundwater model
The soil acts to partition hydrological inputs such as rainfall or snowmelt into surface runoff, soil moisture, evapotranspiration and groundwater recharge.

Infiltration (hydrology)

infiltrationinfiltrateinfiltration capacity
Rates of groundwater recharge are difficult to quantify since other related processes, such as evaporation, transpiration (or evapotranspiration) and infiltration processes must first be measured or estimated to determine the balance.
Groundwater recharge

Hydrology (agriculture)

water balanceagricultural hydrologyagricultural water balance
Hydrology (agriculture)
2) Per – Percolation of water from the unsaturated root zone into the transition zone

Drainage

draineddraindrainage channel
Drainage
Deep drainage

Hydrology

hydrologicalhydrologisthydrologic
Groundwater recharge or deep drainage or deep percolation is a hydrologic process where water moves downward from surface water to groundwater.

Water

H 2 Oliquid wateraqueous
Groundwater recharge or deep drainage or deep percolation is a hydrologic process where water moves downward from surface water to groundwater.

Surface water

surfacewaterbodies of water
Groundwater recharge or deep drainage or deep percolation is a hydrologic process where water moves downward from surface water to groundwater.

Root

adventitious rootsrootsplant roots
This process usually occurs in the vadose zone below plant roots and is often expressed as a flux to the water table surface.

Flux

flux densityfluxesion flux
This process usually occurs in the vadose zone below plant roots and is often expressed as a flux to the water table surface.