Group cohesiveness

social cohesiongroup cohesioncohesionsocial cohesivenesscohesivecohesivenessgroup solidaritySocialCohesion (social policy)bonding
Group cohesiveness (also called group cohesion and social cohesion) arises when bonds link members of a social group to one another and to the group as a whole.wikipedia
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Social group

groupsocial groupsgroups
Group cohesiveness (also called group cohesion and social cohesion) arises when bonds link members of a social group to one another and to the group as a whole.
A social group exhibits some degree of social cohesion and is more than a simple collection or aggregate of individuals, such as people waiting at a bus stop, or people waiting in a line.

Self-categorization theory

meta-theoretical debatepsychologically identifiessalient group memberships
Hogg explains how group cohesiveness develops from social attraction with self-categorization theory according to which individuals when looking at others' similarities and differences, mentally categorize themselves and others as part of a group, in-group members, or as not part of a group, out-group members.
It was first applied to the topics of social influence, group cohesion, group polarization, and collective action.

Dunbar's number

Dunbar’s numbersolving social problems100 to 150 people
In primatology and anthropology, the limits to group size are theorized to accord with Dunbar's number.
Proponents assert that numbers larger than this generally require more restrictive rules, laws, and enforced norms to maintain a stable, cohesive group.

Groupthink

group thinkgroup-thinkgroup mind
The theory of groupthink suggests that the pressures hinder the group from critically thinking about the decisions it is making.
Antecedent factors such as group cohesiveness, faulty group structure, and situational context (e.g., community panic) play into the likelihood of whether or not groupthink will impact the decision-making process.

Unit cohesion

cohesionmilitary units
These groups include sports teams, work groups, military units, fraternity groups, and social groups.
Other research has, however, concluded that there is value in distinguishing the components of social cohesion and "[t]ask cohesion ... the commitment to working together on a shared goal", since some studies conclude that unit effectiveness correlates strongly with task cohesion, not with social cohesion.

Solidarity

social solidaritySolidarity movementtogetherness
* Definition: it is social cohesion based upon the dependence which individuals have on each other in more advanced societies.

Structural cohesion

social cohesionsocial cohesivenesscohesion
Structural cohesion is the sociological conception of a useful formal definition and measure of cohesion in social groups.

Ouseley Report

Ouseley
"If there has been a key word added to the Runnymede lexicon in 2002, it is cohesion. A year from publication of the report of the Commission on the Future of Multi-Ethnic Britain, the Cantle, Denham, Clarke, Ouseley and Ritchie reports moved cohesion to the forefront of the UK race debate."

Social network

networknetworkingnetworks
Subset level research may focus on distance and reachability, cliques, cohesive subgroups, or other group actions or behavior.

2001 Oldham riots

Oldham Riots2001 Oldham race riotsOldham
"If there has been a key word added to the Runnymede lexicon in 2002, it is cohesion. A year from publication of the report of the Commission on the Future of Multi-Ethnic Britain, the Cantle, Denham, Clarke, Ouseley and Ritchie reports moved cohesion to the forefront of the UK race debate." Social cohesion has become an important theme in British social policy in the period since the disturbances in Britain's Northern mill towns (Oldham, Bradford and Burnley) in the summer of 2001 (see Oldham riots, Bradford riots, Burnley riots).

Social integration

integrationreintegrationintegrate
Social integration is focused on the need to move toward a safe, stable and just society by mending conditions of social disintegration, social exclusion, social fragmentation, exclusion and polarization, and by expanding and strengthening conditions of social integration towards peaceful social relations of coexistence, collaboration and cohesion.

Teamwork

Team workteam playerTeam play
Some have suggested that cohesiveness among group members develops from a heightened sense of belonging, teamwork, and interpersonal and group-level attraction.

Interpersonal attraction

attractionattractedChemistry
Lott and Lott (1965) argued that interpersonal attraction within the group is sufficient to account for group cohesion.

Social identity theory

social identityidentity theorysocial identities
Later theorists (1992) wrote that attraction to the group as a whole causes group cohesion, a concept reminiscent of the social identity theory.

In-group and out-group

ingroupin-groupoutgroup
Hogg explains how group cohesiveness develops from social attraction with self-categorization theory according to which individuals when looking at others' similarities and differences, mentally categorize themselves and others as part of a group, in-group members, or as not part of a group, out-group members.

Depersonalization

depersonalisationdepersonalizeddepersonalised
This process is known as depersonalization of self-perception.

Self-perception theory

self-perceptioninferencesperceive themselves
This process is known as depersonalization of self-perception.

Systems theory

systems thinkinginterdependencegeneral systems theory
Members of task-oriented groups typically exhibit great interdependence and often possess feelings of responsibility for the group's outcomes.

Elliot Aronson

Aronson
As shown in dissonance studies conducted by Aronson and Mills (1959) and confirmed by Gerard and Mathewson (1966), this effect can be due to dissonance reduction (see cognitive dissonance).

Cognitive dissonance

cognitive dissonance theorydissonancecognitive consistency
As shown in dissonance studies conducted by Aronson and Mills (1959) and confirmed by Gerard and Mathewson (1966), this effect can be due to dissonance reduction (see cognitive dissonance).

Social loafing

discriminationfree-ridingsucker effect
This is often caused by social loafing, a theory that says individual members of a group will actually put in less effort, because they believe other members will make up for the slack.

Primatology

primatologistprimatologistsprimate
In primatology and anthropology, the limits to group size are theorized to accord with Dunbar's number.

Anthropology

anthropologistanthropologicalanthropologists
In primatology and anthropology, the limits to group size are theorized to accord with Dunbar's number.

Motivation

intrinsic motivationmotivationalmotives
Cohesion and motivation of team members are key factors that contribute to a company's performance.

Attachment theory

attachmentattachment styleattachment styles
Attachment theory has also asserted that adolescents with behavioral problems do not have close interpersonal relationships or have superficial ones.