Grumman F-14 Tomcat

F-14 TomcatF-14F-14A TomcatGrumman F-14A TomcatF-14DF-14 TomcatsF-14AF-14BF-14sGrumman F-14B Tomcat
The Grumman F-14 Tomcat is an American supersonic, twin-engine, two-seat, twin-tail, variable-sweep wing fighter aircraft.wikipedia
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Fighter aircraft

fighterfightersjet fighter
The Grumman F-14 Tomcat is an American supersonic, twin-engine, two-seat, twin-tail, variable-sweep wing fighter aircraft.
Some of the most expensive fighters such as the US Grumman F-14 Tomcat, McDonnell Douglas F-15 Eagle, Lockheed Martin F-22 Raptor and Russian Sukhoi Su-27 were employed as all-weather interceptors as well as air superiority fighter aircraft, while commonly developing air-to-ground roles late in their careers.

Boeing F/A-18E/F Super Hornet

F/A-18E/F Super HornetF/A-18E Super HornetF/A-18F Super Hornet
The Tomcat was retired from the U.S. Navy's active fleet on 22 September 2006, having been supplanted by the Boeing F/A-18E/F Super Hornet.
The Super Hornet entered service with the United States Navy in 2001, replacing the Grumman F-14 Tomcat, which was retired in 2006; the Super Hornet serves alongside the original Hornet.

Islamic Republic of Iran Air Force

Iranian Air ForceAir ForceIRIAF
In the 1980s, F-14s were used as land-based interceptors by the Islamic Republic of Iran Air Force during the Iran–Iraq War, where they saw combat against Iraqi warplanes.
Simultaneously, Iran began construction of two domestically produced fighters, upgraded using technology from the F-14 Tomcat and the F-5 Tiger II.

AIM-54 Phoenix

AIM-54Phoenix missilePhoenix
The VFX's air-to-air missiles would be either six AIM-54 Phoenix or a combination of six AIM-7 Sparrow and four AIM-9 Sidewinder missiles.
The AIM-54 Phoenix is a radar-guided, long-range air-to-air missile (AAM), carried in clusters of up to six missiles on the Grumman F-14 Tomcat, its only operational launch platform.

Iran–Iraq War

Iran-Iraq warTanker WarIraq-Iran War
In the 1980s, F-14s were used as land-based interceptors by the Islamic Republic of Iran Air Force during the Iran–Iraq War, where they saw combat against Iraqi warplanes.
Meanwhile, Iraqi air attacks on Iran were repelled by Iran's F-14 Tomcat interceptor fighter jets, using Phoenix missiles, which downed a dozen of Iraq's Soviet-built fighters in the first two days of battle.

Tactical Airborne Reconnaissance Pod System

TARPSATARSTactical Air Reconnaissance Pod System (TARPS)
The Tactical Airborne Reconnaissance Pod System (TARPS) was developed in the late 1970s for the F-14.
The Tactical Airborne Reconnaissance Pod System (TARPS) was a large and sophisticated camera pod carried by the Grumman F-14 Tomcat.

Thomas F. Connolly

Thomas Connolly
Vice Admiral Thomas F. Connolly, Deputy Chief of Naval Operations for Air Warfare, flew the developmental F-111A variant on a flight and discovered that it had difficulty going supersonic and had poor carrier landing characteristics.
Connolly was instrumental in the development of the Grumman F-14 Tomcat.

Grumman A-6 Intruder

A-6 IntruderA-6E IntruderGrumman A-6E Intruder
In the 1990s, with the pending retirement of the A-6 Intruder, the F-14 air-to-ground program was resurrected.
When the A-6E was scheduled for retirement, its precision strike mission was taken over by the Grumman F-14 Tomcat equipped with a LANTIRN pod.

VFAX

FX (Fighter Experimental)
The Navy studied the need for VFAX, an additional fighter that was more agile than the F-4 Phantom for air-combat and ground-attack roles.
This role was dropped in favor of the VFX aircraft, which emerged as the F-14 Tomcat.

McDonnell Douglas F/A-18 Hornet

F/A-18 HornetF/A-18F-18
During Operation Desert Storm of the Gulf War, most air-to-ground missions were left to A-7, A-6 Intruder and F/A-18 Hornet squadrons, while the F-14s focused on air defense operations.
Its versatility and reliability have proven it to be a valuable carrier asset, though it has been criticized for its lack of range and payload compared to its earlier contemporaries, such as the Grumman F-14 Tomcat in the fighter and strike fighter role, and the Grumman A-6 Intruder and LTV A-7 Corsair II in the attack role.

Pratt & Whitney TF30

TF30TF-30Pratt & Whitney/SNECMA TF106
Grumman's design reused the TF30 engines from the F-111B, though the Navy planned on replacing them with the Pratt & Whitney F401-400 engines under development for the Navy, along with the related Pratt & Whitney F100 for the USAF. The F-14 was initially equipped with two Pratt & Whitney TF30 (or JTF10A) augmented turbofan engines, each rated at 20,900 lb (93 kN) of thrust, which enabled the aircraft to attain a maximum speed of Mach 2.34.
It was later adapted with an afterburner for supersonic designs, and in this form it was the world's first production afterburning turbofan, going on to power the F-111 and the F-14A Tomcat, as well seeing use in early versions of the A-7 Corsair II without an afterburner.

VF-124

Fighter Squadron 124 (VF-124)Fighter Squadron 124Fighter Squadron 53 (VF-53)
The United States Marine Corps was initially interested in the F-14 as an F-4 Phantom II replacement; going so far as to send officers to Fighter Squadron One Twenty-Four (VF-124) to train as instructors.
The squadron's task as an FRS was the training of pilots for the F-8 Crusader, and later the training of pilots and radar intercept officers for the F-14 Tomcat.

LTV A-7 Corsair II

A-7 Corsair IIA-7D Corsair IIA-7
During Operation Desert Storm of the Gulf War, most air-to-ground missions were left to A-7, A-6 Intruder and F/A-18 Hornet squadrons, while the F-14s focused on air defense operations.
To achieve the required range, the A-7 was powered by a Pratt & Whitney TF30-P-6 turbofan producing 11,345 lbf (50.5 kN) of thrust, the same innovative combat turbofan produced for the General Dynamics F-111 Aardvark and early Grumman F-14 Tomcats, but without the afterburner needed for supersonic speeds.

General Dynamics

General Dynamics CorporationGeneral Dynamics Corp.Saco Defense
The F-111 manufacturer General Dynamics partnered with Grumman on the Navy F-111B.
Grumman went on to use many of the innovations of the F-111 in the highly successful F-14 Tomcat, an aircraft designed solely as a carrier-borne fighter.

General Dynamics F-111 Aardvark

F-111General Dynamics F-111F-111 Aardvark
The Navy was directed to participate in the Tactical Fighter Experimental (TFX) program with the U.S. Air Force by Secretary of Defense Robert McNamara.
The U.S. Navy's role intended for the F-111B was instead filled by another variable-geometry design, the Grumman F-14 Tomcat.

Air superiority fighter

air superiorityAir Defenceair-superiority
The F-14 served as the U.S. Navy's primary maritime air superiority fighter, fleet defense interceptor, and tactical aerial reconnaissance platform into the 2000s.
After lessons learned from combat experiences involving modern military air capacity, the U.S. Navy's VFAX/VFX and U.S. Air Force's F-X (Fighter Experimental) reassessed their tactical direction which resulted in the U.S. Navy's F-14 Tomcat and US Air Force's F-15 Eagle.

LANTIRN

Low Altitude Navigation and Targeting Infrared for NightAN/AAQ-14AN/AAQ-13
The Low Altitude Navigation and Targeting Infrared for Night (LANTIRN) pod system were added in the 1990s and the Tomcat began performing precision ground-attack missions.
Until the early 1990s, the F-14 Tomcat didn't have clearance to drop bombs even though all Tomcats were built with a Stores Management System (SMS) that included air-to-ground options as well as rudimentary software in the AWG-9.

Turbofan

high-bypass turbofanturbofan engineturbofans
The F-14 was initially equipped with two Pratt & Whitney TF30 (or JTF10A) augmented turbofan engines, each rated at 20,900 lb (93 kN) of thrust, which enabled the aircraft to attain a maximum speed of Mach 2.34.
The first production afterburning turbofan engine was the Pratt & Whitney TF30, which initially powered the F-111 Aardvark and F-14 Tomcat.

Interceptor aircraft

interceptorinterceptorsfighter-interceptor
The F-14 served as the U.S. Navy's primary maritime air superiority fighter, fleet defense interceptor, and tactical aerial reconnaissance platform into the 2000s.
Through the 1960s and 1970s, the rapid improvements in design led to most air-superiority and multirole fighters, such as the Grumman F-14 Tomcat and McDonnell Douglas F-15 Eagle, having the performance to take on the point defense interception role, and the strategic threat moved from bombers to intercontinental ballistic missiles (ICBMs).

Calverton, New York

CalvertonCalverton, NYCalverton, Long Island
Upon winning the contract for the F-14, Grumman greatly expanded its Calverton, Long Island, New York facility for evaluating the aircraft.
A 10000 ft runway was built, and most of Grumman's F-14 Tomcat and E-2C Hawkeye aircraft were to pass through the plant.

Pratt & Whitney F100

F100F100-PW-200F100-PW-229
Grumman's design reused the TF30 engines from the F-111B, though the Navy planned on replacing them with the Pratt & Whitney F401-400 engines under development for the Navy, along with the related Pratt & Whitney F100 for the USAF.
In 1967, the United States Navy and United States Air Force issued a joint engine Request for Proposals (RFP) for the F-14 Tomcat and the FX.

General Dynamics–Grumman F-111B

F-111BGeneral Dynamics-Grumman F-111BGeneral Dynamics/Grumman F-111B
The Tomcat was developed for the United States Navy's Naval Fighter Experimental (VFX) program after the collapse of the F-111B project.
The F-111B would be replaced by the smaller and lighter Grumman F-14 Tomcat, which carried over the engines, AWG-9/Phoenix weapons system, and similar swing-wing configuration.

Avionics

aviation electronicsavionic systemsaerospace
The aircraft's large nose contains a two-person crew and several bulky avionics systems.
Aircraft like the F‑15E and the now retired F‑14 have roughly 20 percent of their budget spent on avionics.

Teen Series

The next generation
The F-14 was the first of the American Teen Series fighters, which were designed incorporating air combat experience against MiG fighters during the Vietnam War.
The term typically includes the F-14 Tomcat, F-15 Eagle, F-16 Fighting Falcon, and F/A-18 Hornet.

1989 air battle near Tobruk

Gulf of Sidra incidentGulf of Sidra incident (1989)1989
U.S. Navy F-14s once again were pitted against Libyan aircraft on 4 January 1989, when two F-14s from VF-32 shot down two Libyan MiG-23 "Floggers" over the Gulf of Sidra in a second Gulf of Sidra incident.
On 4 January 1989, two Grumman F-14 Tomcats of the United States Navy shot down two Libyan-operated Mikoyan-Gurevich MiG-23s which the Americans believed were attempting to engage them, as had happened eight years prior during the Gulf of Sidra incident, in 1981.