Grumman F6F Hellcat

F6F HellcatGrumman HellcatHellcatF6F-5 HellcatF6FGrumman F6F-5 HellcatF6F HellcatsF6FsGrumman F6F-3 HellcatF6F-3 Hellcat
The Grumman F6F Hellcat is an American carrier-based fighter aircraft of World War II. Designed to replace the earlier F4F Wildcat and to counter the Japanese Mitsubishi A6M Zero, it was the United States Navy's dominant fighter in the second half of the Pacific War, outdueling the faster Vought F4U Corsair, which had problems with carrier landings.wikipedia
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Grumman F4F Wildcat

F4F WildcatGrumman MartletGrumman Wildcat
Designed to replace the earlier F4F Wildcat and to counter the Japanese Mitsubishi A6M Zero, it was the United States Navy's dominant fighter in the second half of the Pacific War, outdueling the faster Vought F4U Corsair, which had problems with carrier landings.
Lessons learned from the Wildcat were later applied to the faster F6F Hellcat.

Vought F4U Corsair

F4U CorsairCorsairF4U Corsairs
Designed to replace the earlier F4F Wildcat and to counter the Japanese Mitsubishi A6M Zero, it was the United States Navy's dominant fighter in the second half of the Pacific War, outdueling the faster Vought F4U Corsair, which had problems with carrier landings.
Yet early problems with carrier landings and logistics allowed it to be eclipsed as the dominant carrier-based fighter by the Grumman F6F Hellcat, powered by the same Double Wasp engine first flown on the Corsair's first prototype in 1940.

Republic P-47 Thunderbolt

P-47 ThunderboltP-47P-47 Thunderbolts
Powered by a Pratt & Whitney R-2800 Double Wasp, the same powerplant used for both the Corsair and the United States Army Air Forces (USAAF) Republic P-47 Thunderbolt fighters, the F6F was an entirely new design, but it still resembled the Wildcat in many ways.
The P-47 was designed around the powerful Pratt & Whitney R-2800 Double Wasp engine, which was also used by two U.S. Navy/U.S. Marine Corps fighters, the Grumman F6F Hellcat and the Vought F4U Corsair.

Grumman TBF Avenger

Grumman AvengerTBM AvengerGrumman TBM Avenger
The aircraft was originally designed to use the Wright R-2600 Twin Cyclone two-row, 14-cylinder radial engine of (the same engine used with Grumman's then-new torpedo bomber under development), driving a three-bladed Curtiss Electric propeller.
To ease carrier storage concerns, simultaneously with the F4F-4 model of its Wildcat carrier fighter, Grumman designed the Avenger to also use the new Sto-Wing patented "compound angle" wing-folding mechanism, intended to maximize storage space on an aircraft carrier; the Wildcat's replacement the F6F Hellcat also employed this mechanism.

Pratt & Whitney R-2800 Double Wasp

Pratt & Whitney R-2800Double WaspPratt & Whitney Double Wasp
Powered by a Pratt & Whitney R-2800 Double Wasp, the same powerplant used for both the Corsair and the United States Army Air Forces (USAAF) Republic P-47 Thunderbolt fighters, the F6F was an entirely new design, but it still resembled the Wildcat in many ways.
The R-2800 also powered the Corsair's naval rival, the Grumman F6F Hellcat, the U.S. Army Air Forces' Republic P-47 Thunderbolt (which uniquely, for single-engined aircraft, used a General Electric turbocharger), the twin-engine Martin B-26 Marauder and Douglas A-26 Invader, as well as the first purpose-built twin-engine radar-equipped night fighter, the Northrop P-61 Black Widow.

Edward O'Hare

Edward "Butch" O'HareButch O'HareEdward H. "Butch" O'Hare
On 22 April 1942, Lieutenant Commander Butch O'Hare toured the Grumman Aircraft company and spoke with Grumman engineers, analyzing the performance of the F4F Wildcat against the Mitsubishi A6M Zero in aerial combat.
During this encounter with a group of Japanese torpedo bombers, O'Hare's Grumman F6F Hellcat was shot down; his aircraft was never found.

Wright R-2600 Twin Cyclone

Wright R-2600Twin CycloneWright ''Twin Cyclone
The aircraft was originally designed to use the Wright R-2600 Twin Cyclone two-row, 14-cylinder radial engine of (the same engine used with Grumman's then-new torpedo bomber under development), driving a three-bladed Curtiss Electric propeller.
It was also the original engine choice for the F6F Hellcat; a running change (one which would not stop production) for the CW-20A, and one in late April 1942 for the second XF6F-1, led to the adoption of the 2,000 hp Pratt & Whitney R-2800 Double Wasp in the R-2600's place for both designs.

Fighter aircraft

fighterfightersjet fighter
The Grumman F6F Hellcat is an American carrier-based fighter aircraft of World War II.
First, second-generation Allied fighters such as the Hellcat and the P-38, and later the Corsair, the P-47 and the P-51, began arriving in numbers.

M2 Browning

.50 cal (12.7 mm)M2 Browning machine gun0.5 in
Standard armament on the F6F-3 consisted of six .50 in (12.7 mm) M2/AN Browning air-cooled machine guns with 400 rounds per gun.
Some famous examples being the P-40, P-47 and P-51 for the USAAF and the F4F, F6F and the F4U for the US Navy.

Landing gear

undercarriagemonowheelmonowheel gear
Instead of the Wildcat's narrow-track, hand-cranked main landing gear retracting into the fuselage that it had inherited, little changed in design from the 1931-debuted Grumman FF-1 fighter biplane, the Hellcat had wide-set, hydraulically actuated landing gear struts that rotated through 90° while retracting backwards into the wings, but with full wheel doors fitted to the struts that covered the entire strut and the upper half of the main wheel when retracted, and twisted with the main gear struts through 90º during retraction.
Examples are the Curtiss P-40, Vought F4U Corsair, Grumman F6F Hellcat, Messerschmitt Me 210 and Junkers Ju 88.

David McCampbell

David S. McCampbellCapt. David S. McCampbellMcCampbell
The U.S. Navy's all-time leading ace, Captain David McCampbell, scored all his 34 victories in the Hellcat.
McCampbell is the United States Navy's all-time leading flying ace and top F6F Hellcat ace with 34 aerial victories.

Air supremacy

air superiorityairaerial superiority
The F6F made its combat debut in September 1943, and was best known for its role as a rugged, well-designed carrier fighter, which was able to outperform the A6M Zero and help secure air superiority over the Pacific theater.
In the Pacific Theater, the A6M Zero gave Japan air superiority for much of the early part of the war, but suffered against newer naval fighters such as the F6F Hellcat and F4U Corsair which exceeded the Zero in performance and durability.

Kawanishi N1K

Kawanishi N1K-JN1K-JKawanishi N1K-J Shiden
A formidable opponent for the Hellcat was the Kawanishi N1K, but it was produced too late and in insufficient numbers to affect the outcome of the war.
Unlike the Mitsubishi A6M Zero, the Shiden Kai could compete against the best late-war Allied fighters, such as the F6F Hellcat, F4U Corsair, and P-51 Mustang.

Night fighter

night-fighternight fightersnightfighter
Postwar, the Hellcat was phased out of front-line service, but remained in service as late as 1954 as a night fighter.
To counter these raids, the Navy fitted microwave-band, compact radar sets to the wings of its single-engined Grumman F6F Hellcat and Vought F4U Corsair fighters by the close of the war, operating them successfully in the Pacific.

High Velocity Aircraft Rocket

HVARHoly Moses (rocket)5-inch HVAR
Six high-velocity aircraft rockets (HVARs) could be carried – three under each wing on "zero-length" launchers.
Other single-engine delivery aircraft included the Vought F4U Corsair, Grumman F6F Hellcat, Grumman TBF/TBM Avenger, and Curtiss SB2C Helldiver.

VF-9

Fighting Squadron (VF) 9Fighting Squadron 9
The first production F6F-3, powered by an R-2800-10, flew on 3 October 1942, with the type reaching operational readiness with VF-9 on in February 1943.
VF-9 became the first Navy squadron to receive the F6F-3 Hellcat in February 1943.

Leroy Grumman

Leroy Randle GrummanRoy GrummanGrumman
Throughout early 1942, Leroy Grumman, along with his chief designers Jake Swirbul and Bill Schwendler, worked closely with the U.S. Navy's Bureau of Aeronautics (BuAer) and experienced F4F pilots, to develop the new fighter in such a way that it could counter the Zero's strengths and help gain air command in the Pacific Theater of Operations.
Beginning with the Wildcat and then with the F6F Hellcat fighters, Grumman and Swirbul remained the key figures in the design office.

United States Navy

U.S. NavyUS NavyNavy
Designed to replace the earlier F4F Wildcat and to counter the Japanese Mitsubishi A6M Zero, it was the United States Navy's dominant fighter in the second half of the Pacific War, outdueling the faster Vought F4U Corsair, which had problems with carrier landings.
Leading navy aircraft in World War II included the Grumman F4F Wildcat, the Grumman F6F Hellcat, the Chance Vought F4U Corsair, the Douglas SBD Dauntless, and the Grumman TBF Avenger.

Grumman F8F Bearcat

F8F BearcatF8F-1 BearcatGrumman F8F-1 Bearcat
After the war, the Hellcat was succeeded by the F8F Bearcat, which was smaller, more powerful (powered by uprated Double Wasp radials) and more maneuverable, but entered service too late to see combat in World War II.
Another goal was that the G-58 (Grumman's design designation for the aircraft) should be able to operate from escort carriers, which were then limited to the obsolescent F4F Wildcat as the Grumman F6F Hellcat was too large and heavy.

Mitsubishi A6M Zero

A6M ZeroMitsubishi A6MZero
Designed to replace the earlier F4F Wildcat and to counter the Japanese Mitsubishi A6M Zero, it was the United States Navy's dominant fighter in the second half of the Pacific War, outdueling the faster Vought F4U Corsair, which had problems with carrier landings.
When the powerfully armed Lockheed P-38 Lightning, armed with four "light barrel" AN/M2 .50 cal. Browning machine guns and one 20 mm autocannon, and the Grumman F6F Hellcat and Vought F4U Corsair, each with six AN/M2 heavy calibre Browning guns, appeared in the Pacific theater, the A6M, with its low-powered engine and lighter armament, was hard-pressed to remain competitive.

AN/APS-4

APS-4ASV Mark IXPS-18/A
Two night fighter subvariants of the F6F-3 were developed; the 18 F6F-3E's were converted from standard-3s and featured the AN/APS-4 10 GHz frequency radar in a pod mounted on a rack beneath the right wing, with a small radar scope fitted in the middle of the main instrument panel and radar operating controls installed on the port side of the cockpit.
In American service it was used on many aircraft, including the Douglas C-47 Skytrain Douglas C-117 North American P-82D/F/H Twin Mustang Vought F4U-4E Corsair Grumman F6F-3E/5E Hellcat Curtiss SB2C-5 Helldiver and Grumman TBF-3 and TBM-3S Avenger.

Blue Angels

U.S. Navy Blue AngelsThe Blue AngelsU.S. Navy Flight Demonstration Squadron, The Blue Angels
The F6F-5 subtype also gained fame as the first aircraft used by the U.S. Navy's Blue Angels official flight demonstration team at its formation in 1946.
The current shades of blue and yellow were adopted when the first demonstration aircraft were transitioned from the Grumman F6F-5 Hellcat to the Grumman F8F-1 Bearcat in August 1946; the aircraft were an all-yellow scheme with blue markings during the 1949 show season.

British Pacific Fleet

PacificPacific FleetPacific Fleets
1844 Naval Air Squadron, on board of the British Pacific Fleet was the highest scoring unit, with 32.5 kills.

Yanks Air Museum

Rare types on display from World War II include the P-51A Mustang, Curtiss P-40 Warhawk, Lockheed P-38 Lightning, P-47M Thunderbolt, North American B-25 Mitchell, Douglas SBD Dauntless, Curtiss SB2C Helldiver and Grumman F6F Hellcat.

Mitsubishi J2M

Mitsubishi J2M RaidenJ2MMitsubishi J2M ''Raiden
Even so, the aircraft performed well against the best Japanese opponents with a claimed 13:1 kill ratio against the A6M Zero, 9.5:1 against the Nakajima Ki-84, and 3.7:1 against the Mitsubishi J2M during the last year of the war.
J2Ms took part in one of the final aerial combats of the Second World War when four Raidens, accompanied by eight Mitsubishi A6M Zeros, all belonging to the 302nd Kokutai, intercepted a formation of US Navy F6F Hellcats from the aircraft-carrier USS Yorktown (CV-10) during the morning of 15 August 1945 over the Kanto Plain.