Guadalquivir

Guadalquivir RiverRiver GuadalquivirBaetisGuadalquivir ValleyBajo GuadalquivirBetisBetis RiverGuadalquiverPort of SevilleRio Guadalquivir
The Guadalquivir (, also,, ) is the fifth longest river in the Iberian Peninsula and the second longest river with its entire length in Spain.wikipedia
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Spain

SpanishESPKingdom of Spain
The Guadalquivir (, also,, ) is the fifth longest river in the Iberian Peninsula and the second longest river with its entire length in Spain.
Over time, large Moorish populations became established, especially in the Guadalquivir River valley, the coastal plain of Valencia, the Ebro River valley and (towards the end of this period) in the mountainous region of Granada.

Gulf of Cádiz

Gulf of CadizGolfo de Cádiz
Currently it is navigable from the Gulf of Cádiz to Seville, but in Roman times it was navigable to Córdoba.
Two major rivers, the Guadalquivir and the Guadiana, as well as smaller rivers, like the Odiel, the Tinto, and the Guadalete, reach the ocean here.

Córdoba, Spain

CórdobaCordobaCórdoba, Andalusia
Currently it is navigable from the Gulf of Cádiz to Seville, but in Roman times it was navigable to Córdoba.
Pre-urban settlements around the mouth of the Guadalquivir river are known to have existed from the 8th century BC.

Sanlúcar de Barrameda

SanlúcarSanlucar de BarramedaSan Lucar
It begins at Cañada de las Fuentes (village of Quesada) in the Cazorla mountain range (Jaén), passes through Córdoba and Seville and ends at the fishing village of Bonanza, in Sanlúcar de Barrameda, flowing into the Gulf of Cádiz, in the Atlantic Ocean.
Sanlúcar is located on the left bank at the mouth of the Guadalquivir River opposite the Doñana National Park, 52 km from the provincial capital Cádiz and 119 km from Sevilla capital of the autonomous region Andalucía.

Guadalquivir Marshes

Las MarismasLacus LigustinusLigustine Lake
The marshy lowlands at the river's end are known as "Las Marismas".
The Guadalquivir Marshes (in Marismas del Guadalquivir or simply Las Marismas) are a natural region of marshy lowlands on the lower Guadalquivir River.

Doñana National Park

DoñanaCoto de DoñanaCoto Doñana
The river borders Doñana National Park reserve.
The park is an area of marshes, shallow streams, and sand dunes in Las Marismas, the delta where the Guadalquivir River flows into the Atlantic Ocean.

Tartessos

TartessianTartessusTartessians
According to Titus Livius (Livy), The History of Rome, Book 28, the native people of Tartessians or Turdetanians called the river by two names: Kertis/Certis and Rerkēs .
Tartessos or Tartessus, was a semi-mythical harbor city and the surrounding culture on the south coast of the Iberian Peninsula (in modern Andalusia, Spain), at the mouth of the Guadalquivir River.

Turdetani

TudretaniTourdētanoiTurdetanians
According to Titus Livius (Livy), The History of Rome, Book 28, the native people of Tartessians or Turdetanians called the river by two names: Kertis/Certis and Rerkēs .
The Turdetani were an ancient pre-Roman peoples of the Iberian Peninsula (the Roman Hispania), living in the valley of the Guadalquivir (the river that the Turdetani called by two names: Kertis and Pérkēs; Romans would call the river by the name Baetis), in what was to become the Roman Province of Hispania Baetica (modern Andalusia, Spain).

Seville

Seville, SpainSevillaSevilla, Spain
Currently it is navigable from the Gulf of Cádiz to Seville, but in Roman times it was navigable to Córdoba.
It is situated on the lower reaches of the River Guadalquivir, in the southwest of the Iberian Peninsula.

Iberian Peninsula

IberiaIberianPeninsula
The Guadalquivir (, also,, ) is the fifth longest river in the Iberian Peninsula and the second longest river with its entire length in Spain.
These are the Ebro, Douro, Tagus, Guadiana and Guadalquivir.

Hispania Baetica

BaeticaBeticaRoman
The Romans called it by the name Baetis (that was the basis for name of the province of Hispania Baetica).
In Latin, Baetica is an adjectival form of Baetis, the Roman name for the Guadalquivir River, whose fertile valley formed one of the most important parts of the province.

Wadi

wadisouedwādī
The modern name of Guadalquivir comes from the Arabic al-wādī l-kabīr, meaning "the great river".
Some Spanish toponyms are derived from Andalusian Arabic where was used to mean a permanent river, for example: Guadalcanal from wādī al-qanāl (وَادِي الْقَنَال, "river of refreshment stalls"), Guadalajara from wādī al-ḥijārah (وَادِي الْحِجَارَة, "river of stones"), or Guadalquivir, from al-wādī al-kabīr (اَلْوَادِي الْكَبِير, "the great river").

Cádiz

CadizCadiz, SpainGades
As navigation of the Guadalquivir River became increasingly difficult Seville's trade monopoly was transferred to Cádiz.
The Phoenician settlement traded with Tartessos, a city-state whose exact location remains unknown but is thought to have been somewhere near the mouth of the Guadalquivir River.

Torre del Oro

Golden TowerTorre de Oro
Ships sailed to Rome with various products: minerals, salt, fish, etc. During Arab rule between 712 and 1248, the Moors left a stone dock and the Torre del Oro (Tower of Gold), to reinforce the port defences.
It was erected by the Almohad Caliphate in order to control access to Seville via the Guadalquivir river.

Alamillo Bridge

Puente del Alamillo1992 designSeville, Spain
Significant bridges at Seville include the Puente del Alamillo (1992), Puente de Isabel II or Puente de Triana (1852), and Puente del V Centenario (1972).
The Alamillo Bridge (Puente del Alamillo) is a structure in Seville, Andalucia (Spain), which spans the Canal de Alfonso XIII, allowing access to La Cartuja, a peninsula between the canal and the Guadalquivir River.

Roman bridge of Córdoba

Roman Bridgeof CórdobaPuente Romano
Of the numerous bridges spanning the Guadalquivir, one of the oldest is the Roman bridge of Córdoba.
The Roman bridge of Córdoba is a bridge in the Historic centre of Córdoba, Andalusia, southern Spain, originally built in the early 1st century BC across the Guadalquivir river, though it has been reconstructed at various times since.

El Tranco de Beas Dam

Embalse de El Tranco de Beas
The El Tranco de Beas Dam at the head of the river was built between 1929 and 1944 as a hydroelectricity project of the Franco regime.
El Tranco de Beas Dam, also known as Pantano del Tranco is a reservoir across the high Guadalquivir in the Sierra de Segura range, Andalusia, Spain.

Andalusia

AndaluciaAndalucíaAndalusian
To the south the geographic subregion of Upper Andalusia lies mostly within the Baetic System, while Lower Andalusia is in the Baetic Depression of the valley of the Guadalquivir.

Bonanza, Spain

BonanzaPort of Barrameda
It begins at Cañada de las Fuentes (village of Quesada) in the Cazorla mountain range (Jaén), passes through Córdoba and Seville and ends at the fishing village of Bonanza, in Sanlúcar de Barrameda, flowing into the Gulf of Cádiz, in the Atlantic Ocean.
Neal Stephenson named half of his novel The Confusion after the port, and had a character describe it as functioning as a chief treasure port of Spain until 1686, and as losing to Cádiz most of what would earlier have been part of its trade, due to the combined effects of increasing vessel draft and of sedimentation at the mouth the river Guadalquivir.

Quesada, Spain

QuesadaQuesada, Jaén
It begins at Cañada de las Fuentes (village of Quesada) in the Cazorla mountain range (Jaén), passes through Córdoba and Seville and ends at the fishing village of Bonanza, in Sanlúcar de Barrameda, flowing into the Gulf of Cádiz, in the Atlantic Ocean.
It is located in the Alto Guadalquivir region and its inhabitants are called quesadenses or quesadeños.

Province of Seville

SevilleSevillaSeville Province
In April 1998 a holding dam burst at the Los Frailes mine, near Aznalcóllar, Seville Province, releasing 4 to 5 e6m3 of mine tailings.
Located on the southern bank of the Guadalquivir river, the city of Seville is the largest one in Andalusia.

Genil

Genil RiverRio GenilRiver Genil
The Genil River is the main (left) tributary of the river Guadalquivir in Andalusia, Spain.

List of rivers of Spain

Adajariver of Spainrivers in Spain
* List of rivers of Spain

Guadaíra

GuadairaGuadaíra River
Its name contains the same guad root as the much larger Rio Guadalquivir, coming from the Arabic word wadi, meaning "river valley".