Map showing the Neolithic Austronesian migrations into the islands of the Indo-Pacific
Reception of the Manila galleon by the Chamorro in the Ladrones Islands, c. 1590. From Boxer Codex.
Reception of the Manila Galleon by the Chamoru in the Ladrones Islands, ca. 1590 Boxer Codex
Colonial tower, a vestige of the former Spanish colony
Main street of Hagåtña, ca. 1899-1900
Saipan under the administration of Japan
U.S. Marines walk through the ruins of Hagåtña, July 1944
Marine infantrymen in Garapan, Saipan
Photograph of Guam from space captured by NASA's now decommissioned Earth observation satellite, Earth Observing-1 (EO-1), on December 30, 2011
The island of Saipan
Guam National Wildlife Refuge beach at Ritidian Point
Map showing the Northern Mariana Islands and its exclusive economic zone (left) in the United States
Previously extensively dredged, Tumon Bay is now a marine preserve.
Saipan seen from the International Space Station
The introduction of the brown tree snake nearly eradicated the native bird population
Map of the Northern Mariana Islands
The Guam Museum in Hagåtña opened in 2016
Ralph Torres, the governor of the Northern Mariana Islands
Youth performance of traditional dance at Micronesia Mall, 2012
Map showing the four municipalities of the Northern Mariana Islands, with Guam shown for context and indicating which islands have airports.
Outrigger canoe team at Tumon
Saipan sunset
Beaches at the tourist center of Tumon
Long Beach, Tinian
A proportional representation of Guam exports, 2019
TTPI High Court judges (some time between 1968 and 1978)
Terminal at Antonio B. Won Pat International Airport. The airport hosts a hub of United Airlines, Guam's largest private-sector employer.
Pagan Island
Map of U.S. military lands on Guam, 2010
A proportional representation of Northern Mariana Islands exports, 2019
Incumbent governor Lou Leon Guerrero
Our Lady of Mount Carmel Cathedral, Chalan Kanoa
Michael San Nicolas is the Delegate for Guam's at-large congressional district.
Chamorro people
Hagåtña from Fort Santa Agueda
Francisco M. Palacios Baseball Field
Guam Highway 8 route marker
Construction at the Port of Guam, 2014
The Umatac Outdoor Library, built in 1933, was the first library in southern Guam.

The CNMI includes the 14 northernmost islands in the Mariana Archipelago; the southernmost island, Guam, is a separate U.S. territory.

- Northern Mariana Islands

These original settlers of Guam and the Northern Mariana Islands evolved into the Chamoru people, historically known as Chamorros after first contact with the Spaniards.

- Guam

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Tropical dry forest on Saipan

Mariana Islands

The Mariana Islands (also the Marianas; in Chamorro: Manislan Mariånas) are a crescent-shaped archipelago comprising the summits of fifteen mostly dormant volcanic mountains in the western North Pacific Ocean, between the 12th and 21st parallels north and along the 145th meridian east.

The Mariana Islands (also the Marianas; in Chamorro: Manislan Mariånas) are a crescent-shaped archipelago comprising the summits of fifteen mostly dormant volcanic mountains in the western North Pacific Ocean, between the 12th and 21st parallels north and along the 145th meridian east.

Tropical dry forest on Saipan
Geology of the west Pacific in the area of the Mariana Islands. The Mariana Islands are at map-right, east of the Philippine Sea and just west of the Mariana Trench in the ocean floor.
Map showing the Neolithic Austronesian migrations into the islands of the Indo-Pacific
Ruins of Guma Taga on Tinian. The pillars/columns are called latte (pronounced læ'di) stones, a common architectural element of prehistoric structures in the Mariana Islands, upon which elevated buildings were built. Earthquakes had toppled the other latte at this site by the time this photo was taken; an earthquake in 1902 toppled the one seen on the left, and today only the one on the right remains standing.
Reception of the Manila Galleon by the Chamorro in the Ladrones Islands, ca. 1590 Boxer Codex
A stamp from the Marianas' late Spanish colonial period, 1898–1899
A 1901 stamp from the German-era Marianas
A U.S. Marine talks a terrified Chamorro woman and her children into abandoning their refuge. Battle of Saipan, 1944.
Chamorro red rice

They are found in the northern part of the western Oceanic sub-region of Micronesia, and are politically divided into two jurisdictions of the United States: the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands and, at the southern end of the chain, the territory of Guam.

Representation of all political parties as percentage in House of Representatives over time

United States House of Representatives

Lower house of the United States Congress, with the Senate being the upper house.

Lower house of the United States Congress, with the Senate being the upper house.

Representation of all political parties as percentage in House of Representatives over time
Historical graph of party control of the Senate and House as well as the presidency
Republican speaker of the House Thomas Brackett Reed (1895–1899)
All 435 voting seats of the current House shown grouped by state, largest to smallest (From 2015)
Population per U.S. representative allocated to each of the 50 states and D.C., ranked by population. Since D.C. (ranked 49th) receives no voting seats in the House, its bar is absent.

The District of Columbia and the territories of Puerto Rico, American Samoa, Guam, the Northern Mariana Islands, and the U.S. Virgin Islands are each represented by one non-voting delegate.

American Samoa

Unincorporated territory of the United States located in the South Pacific Ocean, southeast of the independent state of Samoa.

Unincorporated territory of the United States located in the South Pacific Ocean, southeast of the independent state of Samoa.

Samoa Islands
German, British and American warships in Apia Harbor, Samoa, 1899
1896 map of the Samoa Islands
Tuimanua Elisala Alalamua, the last official titleholder of Tui Manuʻa (1899–1909)
Rear Admiral Benjamin Franklin Tilley, the first Governor of American Samoa (1900–1901)
Commander John Martin Poyer served as the 12th Governor of American Samoa (1915–1919).
Locations of Pacific Ocean splashdowns of American spacecraft
Death of Fleuriot de Langle in 1787
English author W. Somerset Maugham stayed at Sadie Thompson Inn during his six-week visit to Pago Pago in 1916.
Pago Pago Harbor today and inter-island dock area
The Samoan Clipper
Tonga Trench south of the Samoa Islands and north of New Zealand
Lemanu Peleti Mauga, the 58th and incumbent Governor of American Samoa (2021–present)
Map of American Samoa
Cockscomb Point on Pola Island is seen jutting into the ocean.
A view of American Samoa's Ofu Beach on Ofu Island in the Manuʻa Islands
Coastline of American Samoa (in Vatia)
A proportional representation of American Samoa exports, 2019
Tuna boats in the port of Pago Pago
Mascot "Charlie the Tuna" at the StarKist cannery in Atuʻu
The current territorial license plate design, introduced in 2011
American Samoa Route Marker – Main Road
Zion Church in Leone
One of many churches in Samoa
American Samoa Community College
Leone High School
Jean P. Haydon Museum in Pago Pago
American Samoa at the South Pacific Games
High school football game
Pola Island
Aunuʻu Island
National Natural Landmarks
Matafao Peak National Natural Landmark
The Samoa flying fox is only found in Fiji and the Samoan Islands.
The Blue-crowned lorikeet is the only parrot found in American Samoa.

Unlike all other permanently inhabited U.S. jurisdictions (states, District of Columbia, Puerto Rico, U.S. Virgin Islands, Guam and Northern Mariana Islands), American Samoa is not considered a U.S. state for the purposes of the U.S. Immigration and Nationality Act.

Territories of the United States

Territories of the United States are sub-national administrative divisions overseen by the U.S. federal government.

Territories of the United States are sub-national administrative divisions overseen by the U.S. federal government.

The American Samoa Fono
Building where the Supreme Court of Guam is located
San Juan, Puerto Rico
Protestant Cay in Christiansted, U.S. Virgin Islands
Tumon Beach in Guam
Mount Tapochau in the Northern Mariana Islands
Ofu Beach on Ofu Island in American Samoa
Wake Island lagoon
Red-footed booby at Palmyra Atoll
Navy memorial and albatross monument with Laysan albatross chicks at Midway Atoll
The United States from 1868 to 1876, including nine organized and two unorganized (at the time) territories
View of El Yunque National Forest in Puerto Rico
Hand-drawn map, 2018
alt=Official photo, with American flag|Amata Coleman Radewagen (R), (American Samoa)
alt=Official photo|Michael San Nicolas (D), (Guam)
alt=Official photo|Gregorio Sablan (D), (Northern Mariana Islands)
alt=Official photo|Jenniffer González (R), (Puerto Rico)
alt=Official photo|Stacey Plaskett (D), (U.S. Virgin Islands)
alt=Lemanu Peleti Mauga|Lemanu Peleti Mauga (NP-D), (American Samoa)
alt=Lou Leon Guerrero|Lou Leon Guerrero (D), (Guam)
alt=A smiling Ralph Torres|Ralph Torres (R), (Northern Mariana Islands)
alt=Pedro Pierluisi|Pedro Pierluisi (PNP-D), (Puerto Rico)
alt=Albert Bryan|Albert Bryan (D), (U.S. Virgin Islands)
Tutuila and Aunu'u (American Samoa)
Guam
Saipan (Northern Mariana Islands)
Puerto Rico
U.S. Virgin Islands
alt=Satellite photo|Baker Island
alt=Satellite photo|Howland Island
alt=Satellite photo|Jarvis Island
alt=Satellite photo|Johnston Atoll
alt=Satellite photo|Kingman Reef
alt=Satellite photo|Midway Atoll
alt=Satellite photo|Navassa Island
alt=Satellite photo|Palmyra Atoll
alt=Satellite photo|Wake Island
American Samoa
Guam
Northern Mariana Islands
Puerto Rico
U.S. Virgin Islands
U.S. exclusive economic zone

Five territories (American Samoa, Guam, the Northern Mariana Islands, Puerto Rico, and the U.S. Virgin Islands) are permanently inhabited, unincorporated territories; the other nine are small islands, atolls, and reefs with no native (or permanent) population.

Chamorro people (1915)

Chamorro people

Chamorro people (1915)
Reception of the Manila Galleon by the Chamorro in the Ladrones Islands, ca. 1590 Boxer Codex
Reconstruction of how latte stone structures may have appeared
Chamorros fishing, 1819
Village scene depicting caste differences, 1819
Taotaomona are believed to live near Latte stones
Chamorro girls in the 1930s
Group of Chamorros on Guam in the mid-1940s
Chamorros at church in Inarajan, Guam in the mid-1940s
Peter Gumataotao is the first Chamorro two-star flag officer in the United States military
Chamorro red rice
Chamorro performers at the Pacific Islander Festival Association in San Diego
Pop singer Pia Mia is of mixed Chamorro ancestry

The Chamorro people ( also CHamoru) are the indigenous people of the Mariana Islands, politically divided between the United States territories of Guam and the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands in Micronesia.

United States

Country primarily located in North America.

Country primarily located in North America.

Cliff Palace in Colorado, built by the Native American Puebloans between AD 1190 and 1260
The original Thirteen Colonies (shown in red) in 1775
Declaration of Independence, a painting by John Trumbull, depicts the Committee of Five presenting the draft of the Declaration to the Continental Congress in Philadelphia, July 4, 1776.
Territorial acquisitions of the United States between 1783 and 1917
The Battle of Gettysburg, fought between Union and Confederate forces on July 1–3, 1863 around Gettysburg, Pennsylvania, was the deadliest of all Civil War battles. With more than 51,000 casualties, it marked a turning point in the Union's ultimate victory in the war.
U.S. Marines raising the American flag on Mount Suribachi during the Battle of Iwo Jima in one of the most iconic images of World War II
Martin Luther King Jr. delivers his famous "I Have a Dream" speech at the Lincoln Memorial during the March on Washington, August 1963.
U.S. president Ronald Reagan (left) and Soviet general secretary Mikhail Gorbachev at the Geneva Summit, February 1985
The World Trade Center in New York City burning from the September 11 terrorist attacks by the Islamic terrorist group al-Qaeda in 2001
Topographic map of the United States.
A map showing climate regions in the United States
The bald eagle has been the national bird of the United States since 1782.
Map of the United States showing the 50 states, the District of Columbia, and the five major U.S. territories
The headquarters of the United Nations, of which the U.S. is a founding member, has been situated in Midtown Manhattan since 1952.
U.S. Government spending and revenue from 1792 to 2018
The Pentagon, located in Arlington, Virginia across the Potomac River from Washington, D.C., is home to the U.S. Department of Defense.
Total incarceration in the United States by year (1920–2014)
A proportional representation of United States exports, 2019
Buzz Aldrin on the Moon, July 1969
Wealth inequality in the U.S. increased between 1989 and 2013.
The Interstate Highway System in the contiguous United States, which extends 46876 mi
Most prominent religion by state according to a 2014 Pew Research study
Jackson Memorial Hospital in Miami, the primary teaching hospital of the University of Miami's Leonard M. Miller School of Medicine and the largest hospital in the United States with 1,547 beds
The University of Virginia, founded by Thomas Jefferson, is one of the many public colleges and universities in the United States. Some 80% of U.S. college students attend these types of institutions.
The Statue of Liberty, a gift from France, has become an iconic symbol of the American Dream.
Mark Twain, American author and humorist
Roast turkey, a traditional menu item of an American Thanksgiving dinner, November 2021
Grammy Museum at L.A. Live in Los Angeles, April 2009
The Hollywood Sign in Los Angeles, California, September 2015
The headquarters of the National Broadcasting Company (NBC) at Rockefeller Plaza in New York City
"the united states of America", April 6, 1776
The Empire State Building was the tallest building in the world when completed in 1931, during the Great Depression.
Rock formations in the Grand Canyon, northern Arizona
The bald eagle has been the national bird of the United States since 1782.
The amount of US debt, measured as a percentage of GDP from 1790 to 2018
The nuclear-powered aircraft carrier USS George Washington (CVN 73)
The New York City Police Department is the nation's largest municipal law enforcement agency.
The New York Stock Exchange on Wall Street in New York City
Percentage of respondents in the United States saying that religion is "very important" or "somewhat important" in their lives (2014)
The Texas Medical Center in downtown Houston is the largest medical complex in the world.

Puerto Rico, Guam, and the Philippines were ceded by Spain in the same year, following the Spanish–American War.

The five populated but unincorporated territories of Puerto Rico, American Samoa, Guam, Northern Mariana Islands, and U.S. Virgin Islands together cover 9185 sqmi.

John A. Burns of Hawaii, the last of a series of delegates to continuously serve in Congress

Non-voting members of the United States House of Representatives

Non-voting members of the United States House of Representatives (called either delegates or resident commissioner, in the case of Puerto Rico) are representatives of their territory in the House of Representatives, who do not have a right to vote on proposed legislation in the full House but nevertheless have floor privileges and are able to participate in certain other House functions.

Non-voting members of the United States House of Representatives (called either delegates or resident commissioner, in the case of Puerto Rico) are representatives of their territory in the House of Representatives, who do not have a right to vote on proposed legislation in the full House but nevertheless have floor privileges and are able to participate in certain other House functions.

John A. Burns of Hawaii, the last of a series of delegates to continuously serve in Congress
Federico Degetau y González of Puerto Rico, The first resident commissioner in the United States Congress
Amata C. Radewagen is American Samoa's first female delegate
Walter E. Fauntroy, delegate from the District of Columbia from 1971 to 1991
Choctaw Nation Delegate to Washington Peter Pitchlynn who served as ambassador from 1845 to 1861 and again from 1866 to 1881
Cherokee Nation Delegate to Congress Kimberly Teehee

There are currently six non-voting members: a delegate representing the District of Columbia, a resident commissioner representing Puerto Rico, as well as one delegate for each of the other four permanently inhabited U.S. territories: American Samoa, Guam, the Northern Mariana Islands and the U.S. Virgin Islands.

Austronesian peoples

The Austronesian peoples, sometimes referred to as Austronesian-speaking peoples, are a large group of peoples in Taiwan, Maritime Southeast Asia, Micronesia, coastal New Guinea, Island Melanesia, Polynesia, and Madagascar that speak Austronesian languages.

The Austronesian peoples, sometimes referred to as Austronesian-speaking peoples, are a large group of peoples in Taiwan, Maritime Southeast Asia, Micronesia, coastal New Guinea, Island Melanesia, Polynesia, and Madagascar that speak Austronesian languages.

Skulls representing Johann Friedrich Blumenbach's "five races" in De Generis Humani Varietate Nativa (1795). The Tahitian skull labelled "O-taheitae" represented what he called the "Malay race"
The New Physiognomy map (1889) printed by the Fowler & Wells Company depicting Johann Friedrich Blumenbach's five human races. The region inhabited by the "Malay race" is shown enclosed in dotted lines. Like in most 19th century sources, Islander Melanesians are excluded. Taiwan, which was annexed by the Qing Dynasty in the 17th century is also excluded.
Distribution of the Austronesian languages (Blust, 1999)
Paraw sailboats from Boracay, Philippines. Outrigger canoes and crab claw sails are hallmarks of the Austronesian maritime culture.
Coconuts in Rangiroa island in the Tuamotus, French Polynesia, a typical island landscape in Austronesia. Coconuts are native to tropical Asia, and were spread as canoe plants to the Pacific Islands and Madagascar by Austronesians.
Extent of contemporary Austronesia and possible further migrations and contact (Blench, 2009)
Map showing the distribution of the Austronesian language family (light rose pink). It roughly corresponds to the distribution of all the Austronesian peoples.
Samoan man carrying two containers over his shoulder
The Javanese people of Indonesia are the largest Austronesian ethnic group.
Representation of the coastal migration model, with the indication of the later development of mitochondrial haplogroups
Coastlines of Island Southeast Asia, New Guinea, and Australia during the last glacial period
Aeta fishermen in an outrigger canoe in Luzon, Philippines (c. 1899)
Possible language family homelands and the spread of rice into Southeast Asia (ca. 5,500–2,500 BP). The approximate coastlines during the early Holocene are shown in lighter blue.
Yue statue of a tattooed Baiyue man in the Zhejiang Provincial Museum (c. 3rd century BCE)
Suggested early migration route of early Austronesians into and out of Taiwan based on ancient and modern mtDNA data. This hypothesis assumes the Sino-Austronesian grouping, a minority view among linguists. (Ko et al., 2014)
Proposed routes of Austroasiatic and Austronesian migrations into Indonesia (Simanjuntak, 2017)
Proposed genesis of Daic languages and their relation with Austronesians (Blench, 2018)
Early waves of migration to Taiwan proposed by Roger Blench (2014)
Colorized photograph of a Tsou warrior from Taiwan wearing traditional clothing (pre-World War II)
Map showing the migration of the Austronesians
Hōkūlea, a modern replica of a Polynesian double-hulled voyaging canoe, is an example of a catamaran, another of the early sailing innovations of Austronesians
Proposed migration waves from Sundaland in the Late Pleistocene based on mtDNA data; and later "back-migrations" into Island Southeast Asia during the early to mid-Holocene expansion of rice-farming Austronesians from mainland southern China. The extent of the coastlines of Sundaland during the last ice age is presented in light shading; while modern coastlines after the rise of sea levels in the Late Pleistocene to mid-Holocene is in dark shading. (Brandão et al., 2016)
Queen Liliuokalani, the last sovereign monarch of the Kingdom of Hawaii
Succession of forms in the development of the Austronesian boat
Austronesian proto-historic and historic maritime trade network in the Indian Ocean
Aboriginal Taiwanese Architecture
Sama-Bajau villages are typically built directly on shallow water
The raised bale houses of the Ifugao people with capped house posts are believed to be derived from the designs of traditional granaries
Tongkonan houses of the Toraja people with the distinctive saddleback roofs reminiscent of boats
Bai meeting house of the Palauan people with colourfully decorated gables
Māori pataka storehouses
Cast of a Lapita red-slipped earthenware shard from the Santa Cruz Islands (c. 1000 BCE), showing dentate-stamped, circle-stamped, and cross-in-circle decorations. The latter two are shared elements from Neolithic red-slipped pottery from the Nagsabaran Site in the Philippines.
Māori hei matau jade pendant
Hand stencils in the "Tree of Life" cave painting in Gua Tewet, Kalimantan, Indonesia
Watu Molindo ("the entertainer stone"), one of the megaliths in Bada Valley, Central Sulawesi, Indonesia, usually found near megalithic stone vats known as kalamba.
Toraja megaliths memorializing the deceased in Sulawesi, Indonesia
Boats and human figures in a cave painting in the Niah National Park of Sarawak, Malaysia; an example of the Austronesian Painting Traditions (APT)
Petroglyphs in Vanuatu with the concentric circles and swirling designs characteristic of the Austronesian Engraving Style (AES)
Haligi pillars from the Latte period of Guam, these served as supports for raised buildings
The ruins of Nan Madol, a stone city built on artificial islets in Pohnpei
A rai stone, large stone discs used as currency in Yap
A marae sacred site in Raiatea, French Polynesia
Hawaiian petroglyph depicting a poi dog (īlio)
Carving of Rongo, the Māori deity (atua) of kūmara, from Taranaki, North Island, New Zealand
A 1782 illustration of a heiau temple in Hawaii
Elder Tayal women from Taiwan with facial tattoos
Teeth filing on a Mentawai man in the Mentawai Islands, Dutch East Indies, c. 1938
Tablet B of rongorongo, an undeciphered system of glyphs from Rapa Nui
An example of the abundant petroglyphs in Orongo, Rapa Nui associated with the tangata manu cult of Makemake. Rongorongo does not appear in any of these petroglyphs.
The Talang Tuo inscription, a 7th-century Srivijaya stele featuring Old Malay written in a derivative of the Pallava script
Page from Doctrina Cristiana Española Y Tagala (1593) featuring the Baybayin script alongside the Latin alphabet
Wharenui meeting house of the Māori people
Besakana of the Merina people
Bahay kubo of the Filipinos. Also known as Payag in Visayan.
Bure of the Fijian people
Uma mbatangu of the Sumba people
Jabu of the Toba Batak people
Rumoh of the Acehnese people
Rumah gadang of the Minangkabau people
Torogan of the Maranao people
Kubing jaw harps, flutes, and a kagul slit drum from the Philippines
Karinding jaw harps of the Sundanese people, Indonesia
Sapeh, traditional lutes of the Orang Ulu people of Malaysia
Atingting kon, wooden slit drums from Vanuatu
An Indonesian gamelan ensemble
A kanaka maoli (native) from Hawaii performing the hula
Kapa haka of the Māori people
Traditional song and dance at a funeral in Tana Toraja, Sulawesi, Indonesia
Ramayana Ballet, traditional theatre dance from Java, Indonesia
Gending Sriwijaya, traditional dance from Palembang, Indonesia
A Minahasan Kabasaran war dancer from Tomohon, North Sulawesi, Indonesia
Kecak dancers from Bali, Indonesia
Hudoq, traditional dance from Kalimantan, Indonesia
Aloalo funerary pole of the Sakalava people of Madagascar
Adu zatua ancestor carvings of the Nias people of western Indonesia
Taotao carvings of anito ancestor spirits from the Ifugao people, Philippines
Stone tiki from Hiva Oa, Marquesas
Ki'i carving at Puʻuhonua o Hōnaunau, Hawaii
Māori poupou from the Ruato tomb of Rotorua
Moai in Ahu Tongariki, Rapa Nui
Toraja tau tau (wooden statue of the deceased) in South Sulawesi, Indonesia
Balinese small familial house shrines to honor the households' ancestors in Bali, Indonesia

Soon after reaching the Philippines, Austronesians colonized the Northern Mariana Islands by 1500 BCE and Palau and Yap by 1000 BCE, becoming the first humans to reach Remote Oceania.

Western Europeans in search of spices and gold later colonized most of the Austronesian-speaking countries of the Asia-Pacific region, beginning from the 16th century with the Portuguese and Spanish colonization of the Philippines, Palau, Guam, the Mariana Islands, and some parts of Indonesia (present-day East Timor); the Dutch colonization of the Indonesian archipelago; the British colonization of Malaysia and Oceania; the French colonization of French Polynesia; and later, the American governance of the Pacific.

Federated States of Micronesia

Island country in Oceania.

Island country in Oceania.

Manila Galleon in the Marianas and Carolinas, c. 1590 Boxer Codex
Sea Hawk helicopter (US Navy) flies over the waters of Chuuk, Micronesia.
The FSS Tosiwo Nakayama, a Guardian-class patrol boat of the Federated States of Micronesia
A map of the Federated States of Micronesia
A view of Kolonia Town from Sokehs Ridge in Pohnpei
Satawal Island, Yap State
Fishing in Chuuk, 1931
People performing a welcome ceremony on the Ulithi atoll
A beach in Chuuk
Cathedral of Ponape Belltower, in Kolonia, on the island of Pohnpei, built in 1909 by German Capuchin missionaries
A large (approximately 2.4 m or about 8 ft in height) example of Yapese stone money (Rai stones) in the village of Gachpar
Yapese men dancing in traditional dress
A shop in Pohnpei selling traditional souveneirs

They lie northeast of Indonesia and Papua New Guinea, south of Guam and the Marianas, west of Nauru and the Marshall Islands, east of Palau and the Philippines, about 2900 km north of eastern Australia, 3,400 km (2,133 mi) southeast of Japan, and some 4000 km southwest of the main islands of the Hawaiian Islands.

Palau, the Marshall Islands, and the Northern Mariana Islands chose not to participate.

Spanish East Indies

The Spanish East Indies (Indias orientales españolas ; ) were the overseas territories of the Spanish Empire in Asia and Oceania from 1565 to 1901, governed from Mexico City and Madrid through the captaincy general in Manila.

The Spanish East Indies (Indias orientales españolas ; ) were the overseas territories of the Spanish Empire in Asia and Oceania from 1565 to 1901, governed from Mexico City and Madrid through the captaincy general in Manila.

Reception of the Manila Galleon by the Chamorro in the Ladrones Islands, ca. 1590, Boxer Codex
Routes of early Spanish expeditions in the Philippines.
Manila, capital of the Spanish East Indies, 1899.
1888 map showing the Spanish East Indies, including Palau Islands (map without Philippines)
300x300px

The territories ruled included present-day Philippines, Guam and the Mariana Islands, as well as Palau, part of Micronesia and for a brief period Northern Taiwan and parts of North Sulawesi and the Moluccas.

the Marianas (1667–1898 or 1899) (now Guam and Northern Mariana Islands)