Guanches

GuanchemenceyGuanche mythologyGuanche peopleaboriginal inhabitantsaboriginal stageaboriginals guanchesBimbacheCanarianCanarian aboriginal religion
The Guanches were the aboriginal inhabitants of the Canary Islands.wikipedia
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Canary Islands

Canary IslandCanariesCanarian
The Guanches were the aboriginal inhabitants of the Canary Islands.
Alternatively, it is said that the original inhabitants of the island, Guanches, used to worship dogs, mummified them and generally treated them as holy animals.

Indigenous peoples

indigenousindigenous peopleaboriginal
The Guanches were the aboriginal inhabitants of the Canary Islands.
The Canary Islands had an indigenous population called the Guanches whose origin is still the subject of discussion among historians and linguists.

Berber languages

BerberBerber languageTamazight
What remains of their language, Guanche – a few expressions, vocabulary words and the proper names of ancient chieftains still borne by certain families – exhibits positive similarities with the Berber languages.
The now extinct Guanche language spoken on the Canary Islands by the Guanches, as well as possibly the languages of the ancient C-Group culture in today's southern Egypt and northern Sudan, are believed to have belonged to the Berber branch of the Afroasiatic family.

Guanche language

GuanchegncGuanche Berber
What remains of their language, Guanche – a few expressions, vocabulary words and the proper names of ancient chieftains still borne by certain families – exhibits positive similarities with the Berber languages.
The Guanche language is an extinct Berber language that was spoken by the Guanches of the Canary Islands until the 17th century or possibly later.

Conquest of the Canary Islands

conquest1341 mapping expeditionconquer the Canary Islands
After the Spanish conquest of the Canaries they were ethnically and culturally absorbed by Spanish settlers, although elements of their culture survive to this day, intermixed within Canarian customs and traditions such as Silbo (the whistled language of La Gomera Island).
Cruising the archipelago for five months, the expedition mapped thirteen islands (seven major, six minor) and surveyed the primeval aboriginal inhabitants, the 'Guanches', bringing back four natives to Lisbon.

First Battle of Acentejo

first
In the First Battle of Acentejo (31 May 1494), called La Matanza (the slaughter), Guanches ambushed the Castilians in a valley and killed many.
The First Battle of Acentejo took place on the island of Tenerife between the Guanches and an alliance of Spaniards, other Europeans, and associated natives (mostly from other islands), on 31 May 1494, during the Spanish conquest of this island.

Bencomo

Benchomo
The northern Menceyatos or provinces fell after the Second Battle of Acentejo with the defeat of the successor of Bencomo, Bentor, Mencey of Taoro—what is now the Orotava Valley—in 1496.
1438 – November 1494) was the penultimate mencey or king of Taoro, a Guanche menceyato on the island of Tenerife.

Battle of Aguere

Battle of San Cristóbal de La Laguna
Lugo later returned to the island with the alliance of the kings of the southern part of the island, and defeated the Guanches in the Battle of Aguere.
The Battle of Aguere, or Battle of San Cristóbal de La Laguna, was fought between forces of the Crown of Castile, led by the Adelantado (military governor) Alonso Fernández de Lugo, and the natives of Tenerife, called Guanches.

Icod de los Vinos

IcodCueva del Viento–Sobrado
Tenerife, specifically the archaeological site of the Cave of the Guanches in Icod de los Vinos, has provided habitation dates dating back to the 6th century BC, according to analysis carried out on ceramics that were found inside the cave.
Mark) is located on the Plaza de Lorenzo Cáceres, the spot where, according to tradition, the Guanches already venerated the saint's icon - una pequeña talla gótica-flamenca - before the conquest.

Bimbache

El Hierro and the Bimbache population were the next to fall, then La Gomera, Gran Canaria, La Palma and in 1496, Tenerife.
The word "Bimbache" means "Sons of the Sons of Tenerife", so were believed to be descendants of the Guanches, the ancient inhabitants of the island of Tenerife.

La Gomera

GomeraGomeranGomerans
After the Spanish conquest of the Canaries they were ethnically and culturally absorbed by Spanish settlers, although elements of their culture survive to this day, intermixed within Canarian customs and traditions such as Silbo (the whistled language of La Gomera Island).
Invented by the original inhabitants of the island, the Guanches, Silbo Gomero was adopted by the Spanish settlers in the 16th century and survived after the Guanches were entirely assimilated.

Haplogroup U (mtDNA)

UU6haplogroup U
mtDNA haplogroup U subclade U6b1 is Canarian-specific and is the most common mtDNA haplogroup found in aboriginal Guanche archaeological burial sites.
Additionally, haplogroup U has been observed in ancient Guanche fossils excavated in Gran Canaria and Tenerife on the Canary Islands, which have been radiocarbon-dated to between the 7th and 11th centuries CE.

Nicoloso da Recco

The first reliable account of the Guanche language was provided by the Genoese explorer Nicoloso da Recco in 1341, with a translation of numbers used by the islanders.
He is credited with providing the first reliable account of the language used by the aboriginal inhabitants of the Canary Islands, the Guanches.

Achamán

Acoran
There was a general belief in a supreme being, called Achamán in Tenerife, Acoran in Gran Canaria, Eraoranhan in Hierro, and Abora in La Palma.
Achamán is the supreme god of the Guanches on the island of Tenerife; he is the father god and creator.

Haplogroup E-M215 (Y-DNA)

E1b1bE-M35E1b1b1
Y-DNA, or Y-chromosomal, (direct paternal) lineages were not analyzed in this study; however, an earlier study giving the aboriginal y-DNA contribution at 6% was cited by Maca-Meyer et al., but the results were criticized as possibly flawed due to the widespread phylogeography of y-DNA haplogroup E1b1b1b, which may skew determination of the aboriginality versus coloniality of contemporary y-DNA lineages in the Canaries.
The E1b1b haplogroup has likewise been observed in ancient Guanche fossils excavated in Gran Canaria and Tenerife on the Canary Islands, which have been radiocarbon-dated to between the 7th and 11th centuries CE.

Guayota

The demon of Tenerife was called Guayota and lived at the peak of Teide volcano, which was the hell called Echeyde; in Tenerife and Gran Canaria, the minor demons took the form of wild black woolly dogs called Jucanchas in the first and Tibicenas in the latter, which lived in deep caves of the mountains, emerging at night to attack livestock and human beings.
Guayota, in Guanche mythology of the Tenerife (Canary Islands), was the principal malignant deity and Achamán's adversary.

Second Battle of Acentejo

second
The northern Menceyatos or provinces fell after the Second Battle of Acentejo with the defeat of the successor of Bencomo, Bentor, Mencey of Taoro—what is now the Orotava Valley—in 1496.
The Second Battle of Acentejo was a battle that took place on 25 December 1494 between the invading Spanish forces and the natives of the island of Tenerife, known as Guanches.

Cave of the Guanches

Tenerife, specifically the archaeological site of the Cave of the Guanches in Icod de los Vinos, has provided habitation dates dating back to the 6th century BC, according to analysis carried out on ceramics that were found inside the cave.
This archaeological area is where the earliest Guanche autochthonous settlements on the island of Tenerife have been found.

Teide

Mount TeidePico del TeideEl Teide
The demon of Tenerife was called Guayota and lived at the peak of Teide volcano, which was the hell called Echeyde; in Tenerife and Gran Canaria, the minor demons took the form of wild black woolly dogs called Jucanchas in the first and Tibicenas in the latter, which lived in deep caves of the mountains, emerging at night to attack livestock and human beings.
Before the 1496 Spanish colonization of Tenerife, the native Guanches referred to a powerful figure living in the volcano, which carries light, power and the sun.

Guatimac

Idol of Guatimac
Idols have been found in the islands, including the Idol of Tara (Museo Canario, Las Palmas de Gran Canaria) and the Guatimac (Museum Archaeological of Puerto de la Cruz in Tenerife).
Guatimac is an owl-shaped Guanche idol figurine, found in 1885 surrounded by the skin of goat and hidden in a cave in Fasnia (Tenerife, Canary Islands, Spain).

Juan Núñez de la Peña

Juan Nuñez de la Peña
It was modified, according to Juan Núñez de la Peña, by the Castilians into "Guanchos".
In it, he examined the Guanche people as well as the genealogies of the European families on the islands.

Alonso Fernández de Lugo

Alonso Fernandez de LugoAlonso de LugoAlonso Fernández de Lugo y de las Casas
Only one in five of the Castilians survived, including the leader of the expedition, Alonso Fernandez de Lugo.
He encountered fierce resistance from some Guanches chiefs there.

Domingo Vandewalle

In 1752, Domingo Vandewalle, a military governor of Las Palmas, attempted to investigate them, and Aquilino Padron, a priest at Las Palmas, catalogued inscriptions at El Julan, La Candía and La Caleta on El Hierro.
He is notable for being the first to discover the Guanches engravings of the Belmaco cave in the municipality of Villa de Mazo in 1752.

Tibicena

The demon of Tenerife was called Guayota and lived at the peak of Teide volcano, which was the hell called Echeyde; in Tenerife and Gran Canaria, the minor demons took the form of wild black woolly dogs called Jucanchas in the first and Tibicenas in the latter, which lived in deep caves of the mountains, emerging at night to attack livestock and human beings.
A Tibicena, also known as Guacanchas, was a mythological creature of the Guanches, prehispanic inhabitants of the Canary Islands.

Las Palmas

Las Palmas de Gran CanariaLas Palmas de G.C.Las Palmas, Canary Islands
Idols have been found in the islands, including the Idol of Tara (Museo Canario, Las Palmas de Gran Canaria) and the Guatimac (Museum Archaeological of Puerto de la Cruz in Tenerife).
Ethnically, most autochthonous Canarians are descendants of a mixture of aboriginal people (guanches) of the Canary Islands (now extinct), the Spanish conquistadores and later European (mainly Spanish, Portuguese, Flemish, Irish, French, Italian, German, and British) colonizers.