Guantanamo Bay detention camp

Guantanamo BayGuantanamo Bay detainment campGuantanamoGuantanamo captiveGuantanamo captivesGuantanamo detaineeGuantánamo Bay detention campGuantánamo BayGuantánamoGuantanamo Bay prison
The Guantanamo Bay detention campis a United States military prison located within Guantanamo Bay Naval Base, also referred to as Guantánamo, G-Bay, GTMO, and Gitmo, which is on the coast of Guantánamo Bay in Cuba.wikipedia
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Guantanamo Bay Naval Base

Guantanamo BayNaval Station Guantanamo BayGuantanamo
The Guantanamo Bay detention campis a United States military prison located within Guantanamo Bay Naval Base, also referred to as Guantánamo, G-Bay, GTMO, and Gitmo, which is on the coast of Guantánamo Bay in Cuba.
Guantanamo Bay Naval Base (Base Naval de la Bahía de Guantánamo), officially known as Naval Station Guantanamo Bay or NSGB, (also called GTMO because of the abbreviation of Guantanamo or Gitmo because of the common pronunciation of this word by the U.S. military ) is a United States military base and detention camp located on 120 square kilometers (45 sq mi) of land and water at Guantánamo Bay, Cuba, which the U.S. leased for use as a coaling station and naval base in 1903.

Camp Iguana

Camp Iguana (Guantanamo Bay)
Detention areas consisted of Camp Delta including Camp Echo, Camp Iguana, and Camp X-Ray, which is now closed.
Camp Iguana is a small compound in the detention camp complex on the US Naval base at Guantánamo Bay, Cuba.

Camp Delta (Guantanamo Bay)

Camp DeltaCamp 5Camp 6
Detention areas consisted of Camp Delta including Camp Echo, Camp Iguana, and Camp X-Ray, which is now closed.
Camp Delta is a permanent American detainment camp at Guantanamo Bay that replaced the temporary facilities of Camp X-Ray.

Hamdan v. Rumsfeld

HamdanHamdam v. RumsfeldHamdan v. Bush
Ensuing U.S. Supreme Court decisions since 2004 have determined otherwise and that U.S. courts do have jurisdiction: it ruled in Hamdan v. Rumsfeld on 29 June 2006, that detainees were entitled to the minimal protections listed under Common Article 3 of the Geneva Conventions.
Hamdan v. Rumsfeld, 548 U.S. 557 (2006), is a case in which the Supreme Court of the United States held that military commissions set up by the Bush administration to try detainees at Guantanamo Bay lack "the power to proceed because its structures and procedures violate both the Uniform Code of Military Justice and the four Geneva Conventions signed in 1949."

Camp Echo (Guantanamo Bay)

Camp EchoCamp Echo (Guantanamo)
Detention areas consisted of Camp Delta including Camp Echo, Camp Iguana, and Camp X-Ray, which is now closed.
Camp Echo is one of seven Guantanamo Bay detention camps associated with Camp Delta, the prisoners' camp, at the Guantanamo Bay detention camp, run by the United States military.

Joint Task Force Guantanamo

JTF-GTMOJoint Task Force 160Joint Detention Group
The facility is operated by the Joint Task Force Guantanamo (JTF-GTMO) of the United States government in Guantanamo Bay Naval Base.
Since January 2002 the command has operated the Guantanamo Bay detention camps Camp X-Ray and its successors Camp Delta, Camp V, and Camp Echo, where detained prisoners are held who have been captured in the war in Afghanistan and elsewhere since the September 11, 2001 attacks.

Guantanamo military commission

Guantanamo military commissionsOffice of Military Commissionsmilitary commissions
On 22 January 2009, President Obama issued a request to suspend proceedings at Guantanamo military commission for 120 days and to shut down the detention facility that year. On 11 February 2008, The U.S. military charged Khalid Sheikh Mohammed, Ramzi bin al-Shibh, Mustafa Ahmad al-Hawsawi, Ali Abd Al-Aziz Ali and Walid bin Attash of committing the September 11 attacks under the military commission system, as established under the Military Commissions Act of 2006 (MCA).
The Guantanamo military commissions are military tribunals authorized by presidential order, then by the Military Commissions Act of 2006, and currently by the Military Commissions Act of 2009 for prosecuting detainees held in the United States Guantanamo Bay detainment camps.

WikiLeaks

wikileaks.orgleakedleaked documents
In April 2011, WikiLeaks began publishing 779 secret files relating to prisoners in the Guantanamo Bay detention camp.
In April 2011, WikiLeaks began publishing 779 secret files relating to prisoners detained in the Guantanamo Bay detention camp.

Abd al-Rahim al-Nashiri

Abd al Rahim al NashiriAbd al-NashiriAbd Al Rahim Hussein Mohammed Al Nashiri
On 29 January 2009, a military judge at Guantanamo rejected the White House request in the case of Abd al-Rahim al-Nashiri, creating an unexpected challenge for the administration as it reviewed how the United States brings Guantanamo detainees to trial.
Al-Nashiri was captured in Dubai in 2002 and held for four years in secret CIA prisons known as "black sites" in Afghanistan, Thailand, Poland, Morocco, and Romania, before being transferred to the Guantanamo Bay detention camp.

Khalid Sheikh Mohammed

Khalid Shaikh MohammedKhalid Sheik MohammedKhalid Sheikh Mohammad
These people include Khalid Sheikh Mohammed, believed to be the No.
Khalid Sheikh Mohammed (sometimes also spelled Khalid Shaikh Mohammed; among at least fifty pseudonyms; born March 1, 1964; or April 14, 1965) is a Pakistani Islamist militant held by the United States at the Guantanamo Bay detention camp under terrorism-related charges.

Adel Noori

58400584Noori, Adel
One example is Adel Noori, a Chinese Uyghur and dissident who had been sold to the US by Pakistani bounty hunters.
Adel Noori is an Uyghur refugee best known for the more than seven years he was wrongly imprisoned in the Guantanamo Bay detention camps, in Cuba.

Guantanamo Bay detention camp suicide attempts

suicidescommitted suicideGuantanamo suicide attempts
Eight men have died in the prison camp; DoD has said that six were suicides.
On June 10, 2006, the DOD announced that three prisoners held by the United States at the Guantanamo Bay detainment camps had committed suicide.

Black site

black sitessecret prisonCIA secret prisons
In January 2010, Scott Horton published an article in Harper's Magazine describing "Camp No", a black site about a mile outside the main camp perimeter, which included an interrogation center.
On September 6, 2006, Bush publicly admitted the existence of secret prisons and announced that many of the detainees held there were being transferred to Guantanamo Bay.

Abu Zubaydah

Zayn al-Abidn Muhammed Hasayn Abu ZubaydahAbu ZabaydaAbu Zabaydah
3 Al-Qaeda leader before he was captured in Pakistan in 2003; Ramzi bin al-Shibh, an alleged would-be 11 September 2001 hijacker; and Abu Zubaydah, who was believed to be a link between Osama bin Laden and many Al-Qaeda cells, who were captured in Pakistan in March 2002.
Abu Zubaydah (ابو زبيدة, Abū Zubaydah; born March 12, 1971, as Zayn al-Abidin Muhammad Husayn) is a Saudi Arabian citizen currently held by the U.S. in the Guantanamo Bay detention camp in Cuba.

Camp seven (Guantanamo)

Camp 7Camp SevenCamp Platinum
In 2008, the Associated Press reported Camp 7, a separate facility on the naval base that is considered the highest security jail on the base, and its location is classified.
Camp Seven (also known as Camp Platinum) is the most secure camp known within the Guantanamo Bay detention camps, in Cuba.

Camp No

In January 2010, Scott Horton published an article in Harper's Magazine describing "Camp No", a black site about a mile outside the main camp perimeter, which included an interrogation center.
Camp No is an alleged secret detention and torture facility (black site) related to the United States detainment camps located in Guantánamo Bay, Cuba.

Guantánamo Bay

Guantanamo BayGuantanamo Bay, CubaGuantánamo Bay, Cuba
The Guantanamo Bay detention campis a United States military prison located within Guantanamo Bay Naval Base, also referred to as Guantánamo, G-Bay, GTMO, and Gitmo, which is on the coast of Guantánamo Bay in Cuba.
It is the home of the Guantanamo Bay Naval Base and the Guantanamo Bay detention camp located within the base, which are both governed by the United States.

Ramzi bin al-Shibh

Ramzi Binalshibh10013Ramzi Bin al-Shaiba
3 Al-Qaeda leader before he was captured in Pakistan in 2003; Ramzi bin al-Shibh, an alleged would-be 11 September 2001 hijacker; and Abu Zubaydah, who was believed to be a link between Osama bin Laden and many Al-Qaeda cells, who were captured in Pakistan in March 2002. On 11 February 2008, The U.S. military charged Khalid Sheikh Mohammed, Ramzi bin al-Shibh, Mustafa Ahmad al-Hawsawi, Ali Abd Al-Aziz Ali and Walid bin Attash of committing the September 11 attacks under the military commission system, as established under the Military Commissions Act of 2006 (MCA).
Ramzi bin al-Shibh (رمزي بن الشيبة, ; also transliterated as bin al-Shaibah) (born May 1, 1972 ) is a Yemeni citizen being held by the U.S. as an enemy combatant detainee at Guantanamo Bay in Cuba.

Center for Constitutional Rights

Center for Constitution RightsThe Center for Constitutional RightsCenter for Constitutional Rights (CCR)
The Center for Constitutional Rights has prepared biographies of some of the prisoners currently being held in Guantanamo Prison.
Since winning the landmark case in the United States Supreme Court of Rasul v. Bush (2004), establishing the right of detainees at Guantanamo Bay detainment camp to challenge their status in US courts and gain legal representation, it has provided legal assistance to people imprisoned there and gained release for many who were unlawfully held or proven not to be a risk to security.

Ammar al-Baluchi

Ali Abdul Aziz AliAmmar al BaluchiAli Abd al-Aziz Ali
On 11 February 2008, The U.S. military charged Khalid Sheikh Mohammed, Ramzi bin al-Shibh, Mustafa Ahmad al-Hawsawi, Ali Abd Al-Aziz Ali and Walid bin Attash of committing the September 11 attacks under the military commission system, as established under the Military Commissions Act of 2006 (MCA).
Ammar Al-Baluchi (عمار البلوشي, ; also transliterated as Amar Al-Balochi, born Ali Abdul Aziz Ali ) is a Pakistani citizen in U.S. custody at Guantanamo Bay detention camp.

Walid bin Attash

Tawfiq bin AttashWalid bin 'AttashWaleed bin Attash
On 11 February 2008, The U.S. military charged Khalid Sheikh Mohammed, Ramzi bin al-Shibh, Mustafa Ahmad al-Hawsawi, Ali Abd Al-Aziz Ali and Walid bin Attash of committing the September 11 attacks under the military commission system, as established under the Military Commissions Act of 2006 (MCA).
Walid Muhammad Salih bin Mubarak bin Attash (وليد محمد صالح بن مبارك بن عتش; born 1978) is a Yemeni prisoner held in extrajudicial detention at the United States' Guantanamo Bay detention camps.

Boumediene v. Bush

Boumediene04cv1166A 2008 decision
In Boumediene v. Bush (2008), the U.S. Supreme Court ruled that the MCA was unconstitutional.
Boumediene v. Bush, 553 U.S. 723 (2008), was a writ of habeas corpus submission made in a civilian court of the United States on behalf of Lakhdar Boumediene, a naturalized citizen of Bosnia and Herzegovina, held in military detention by the United States at the Guantanamo Bay detention camps in Cuba.

Moazzam Begg

Moazzem Begg00558Begg, Moazzam
This supports numerous claims made by former detainees like Moazzam Begg, a British citizen who had been held for three years in detention camps in Afghanistan and Guantanamo.
Moazzam Begg (undefined; born 5 July 1968 in Sparkhill, Birmingham) is a British Pakistani who was held in extrajudicial detention by the US government in the Bagram Theater Internment Facility and the Guantanamo Bay detainment camp, in Cuba, for nearly three years.

Amnesty International

AmnestyAmnesty International UKAmnesty International Norway
Indefinite detention without trial and torture have led the operations of this camp to be considered a major breach of human rights by Amnesty International and a violation of Due Process Clause of the Fifth and Fourteenth amendments of the United States Constitution.
Criticism came directly from the Bush administration and The Washington Post, when Khan, in 2005, likened the US government's detention facility at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, to a Soviet Gulag.

Mustafa al-Hawsawi

Mustafa Ahmed al-HawsawiMustafa Muhammad AhmadMustafa Ahmad al-Hawsawi
On 11 February 2008, The U.S. military charged Khalid Sheikh Mohammed, Ramzi bin al-Shibh, Mustafa Ahmad al-Hawsawi, Ali Abd Al-Aziz Ali and Walid bin Attash of committing the September 11 attacks under the military commission system, as established under the Military Commissions Act of 2006 (MCA).
It was reported in August 2010 that, after months of interrogation, the CIA transferred al-Hawsawi and three other high-value detainees to Guantanamo Bay detention camp on September 24, 2003, for indefinite detention.