Guelders

Duchy of GueldersGelreCounty of GueldersGelderlandDuchy of GelderlandDuchy of GelreGueldresDuke of GelderlandDuchy of GeldernDuke of Guelders
Guelders or Gueldres (Gelre, Geldern) is a historical county, later duchy of the Holy Roman Empire, located in the Low Countries.wikipedia
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Roermond

city of RoermondGalgebergMinderbroederklooster
It was then located on the territory of Lower Lorraine, in the area of Geldern and Roermond, with its main stronghold at Montfort (built 1260). At the Treaty of Utrecht, ending the War of the Spanish Succession in 1713, the Spanish Upper Quarter was again divided between Prussian Guelders (Geldern, Viersen, Horst, Venray), the United Provinces (Venlo, Montfort, Echt), Austria (Roermond, Niederkrüchten, Weert), and the Duchy of Jülich (Erkelenz).
Through the centuries the town has filled the role of commercial centre, principal town in the duchy of Guelders and since 1559 it has served as the seat of the Roman Catholic Diocese of Roermond.

Gelderland

GuelderlandGeldriaProvince of Gelderland
Though the present province of Gelderland (English also Guelders) in the Netherlands occupies most of the area, the former duchy also comprised parts of the present Dutch province of Limburg as well as those territories in the present-day German state of North Rhine-Westphalia that were acquired by Prussia in 1713.
The County of Guelders arose out of the Frankish pagus Hamaland in the 11th century around castles near Roermond and Geldern.

Netherlands

DutchThe NetherlandsHolland
Though the present province of Gelderland (English also Guelders) in the Netherlands occupies most of the area, the former duchy also comprised parts of the present Dutch province of Limburg as well as those territories in the present-day German state of North Rhine-Westphalia that were acquired by Prussia in 1713.
Holland, Hainaut, Flanders, Gelre, Brabant, and Utrecht were in a state of almost continual war or paradoxically formed personal unions.

Geldern

county of GeldernGuelderland
It was then located on the territory of Lower Lorraine, in the area of Geldern and Roermond, with its main stronghold at Montfort (built 1260). The duchy was named after the town of Geldern (Gelder) in present-day Germany. At the Treaty of Utrecht, ending the War of the Spanish Succession in 1713, the Spanish Upper Quarter was again divided between Prussian Guelders (Geldern, Viersen, Horst, Venray), the United Provinces (Venlo, Montfort, Echt), Austria (Roermond, Niederkrüchten, Weert), and the Duchy of Jülich (Erkelenz).
The lion of Guelders, recognizable in the present coat of arms, has been used since the Middle Ages.

Limburg (Netherlands)

LimburgDutch LimburgProvince of Limburg
Though the present province of Gelderland (English also Guelders) in the Netherlands occupies most of the area, the former duchy also comprised parts of the present Dutch province of Limburg as well as those territories in the present-day German state of North Rhine-Westphalia that were acquired by Prussia in 1713.
Also, the central and northern part of present-day Limburg belonged to different political entities, notably the Duchy of Jülich and the Duchy of Guelders.

Veluwe Quarter

Veluwe Quarter was one of the four quarters in the Duchy of Guelders, besides Quarter of Zutphen, Upper Quarter and Nijmegen Quarter.

Nijmegen Quarter

The Nijmegen Quarter (Dutch: Kwartier van Nijmegen) was the first of the four quarters in which the county, later duchy of Guelders was divided, as they were separated by rivers.

Erkelenz

ImmerathImmerath (Erkelenz)Immerath (neu)
At the Treaty of Utrecht, ending the War of the Spanish Succession in 1713, the Spanish Upper Quarter was again divided between Prussian Guelders (Geldern, Viersen, Horst, Venray), the United Provinces (Venlo, Montfort, Echt), Austria (Roermond, Niederkrüchten, Weert), and the Duchy of Jülich (Erkelenz).
The upper part is blue, and contains the golden lion of the duchy of Guelders (Geldern).

Venlo

Venlo Police MuseumSteylthe Dutch border
At the Treaty of Utrecht, ending the War of the Spanish Succession in 1713, the Spanish Upper Quarter was again divided between Prussian Guelders (Geldern, Viersen, Horst, Venray), the United Provinces (Venlo, Montfort, Echt), Austria (Roermond, Niederkrüchten, Weert), and the Duchy of Jülich (Erkelenz).
Tegelen was originally part of the Duchy of Jülich centuries ago, whereas Venlo has a past in the Duchy of Guelders.

Duchy

duchiesdukedomdukedoms
Guelders or Gueldres (Gelre, Geldern) is a historical county, later duchy of the Holy Roman Empire, located in the Low Countries.

County of Zutphen

ZutphenZutphen CountyZutphen quarter of Gelderland
Count Gerard's son Gerard II in 1127 acquired the County of Zutphen in northern Hamaland by marriage.
It was ruled by the Counts of Zutphen between 1018 and 1182, and then formed a personal union with Guelders.

Groenlo

Grol
Groenlo became a Guelders enclave of Borculo.

Duchy of Berg

BergCounty of BergCounts of Berg
In the 12th and 13th century, Guelders quickly expanded downstream along the sides of the Maas, Rhine, and IJssel rivers and even claimed the succession in the Duchy of Limburg, until it lost the 1288 Battle of Worringen against Berg and Brabant.
Count Adolf VIII of Berg fought on the winning side in the Battle of Worringen against Guelders in 1288.

First War of the Guelderian Succession

War of the Guelderian SuccessionGuelders War of SuccessionWar of the Succession of Guelders
After the Wassenberg line became extinct in 1371 following the deaths of Reginald II's childless sons Edward II (on 24 August, from wounds suffered in the Battle of Baesweiler) and Reginald III (on 4 December), the ensuing Guelders War of Succession saw William I of Jülich emerge victorious.
The First War of the Guelderian Succession was a battle for the throne of the Duchy of Guelders that raged between 1371 and 1379.

Prince-Bishopric of Utrecht

Bishopric of UtrechtUtrechtBishop of Utrecht
Guelders was often at war with its neighbours, not only with Brabant, but also with the County of Holland and the Bishopric of Utrecht.
The Counts of Holland and Guelders, between whose territories the lands of the Bishops of Utrecht lay, also sought to acquire influence over the filling of the episcopal see.

Batavia (region)

BetuweBataviaBatavian region
Later, it was mainly absorbed into the newer county of Guelders which had become established to the southeast.

Guelders Wars

Guelderian WarsconflictGuelders feud
Charles, now backed by France, fought Maximilian's grandson Charles of Habsburg (who became Holy Roman Emperor, as Charles V, in 1519) in the Guelders Wars and expanded his realm further north, to incorporate what is now the Province of Overijssel.
The Guelders Wars (Gelderse oorlogen) were a series of conflicts in the Low Countries between the Duke of Burgundy, who controlled Holland, Flanders, Brabant and Hainaut on the one side, and Charles, Duke of Guelders, who controlled Guelders, Groningen and Frisia on the other side.

Adolf, Duke of Guelders

AdolfAdolf of EgmondAdolf II, Duke of Guelders
The first Egmond Duke, Arnold, suffered the rebellion of his son Adolf and was imprisoned by the latter in 1465.
In the battle of succession for Guelders, he imprisoned in 1465 his own father and became Duke with the support of Philip the Good, who also made him Knight in the Order of the Golden Fleece.

Arnold, Duke of Guelders

Arnold of EgmondArnold, Duke of GelderlandArnold
The first Egmond Duke, Arnold, suffered the rebellion of his son Adolf and was imprisoned by the latter in 1465.
Subsequently, however, Duke Arnold fell out with his ally as to the succession to the see of Utrecht, whereupon Philip joined with the four chief towns of Guelders in the successful attempt of Arnold's son Adolf to substitute his own for his father's authority.

Lower Lorraine

Duchy of Lower LorraineLower LotharingiaLorraine
It was then located on the territory of Lower Lorraine, in the area of Geldern and Roermond, with its main stronghold at Montfort (built 1260).

William, Duke of Jülich-Cleves-Berg

Wilhelm, Duke of Jülich-Cleves-BergWilliamWilliam the Rich
He bequeathed the duchy to Duke William the Rich of Jülich-Cleves-Berg (also known as Wilhelm of Cleves).
From 1538 to 1543, William held the neighbouring Duchy of Guelders, as successor of his distant relatives, the Egmond dukes.

Hamaland

Count Gerard's son Gerard II in 1127 acquired the County of Zutphen in northern Hamaland by marriage.
When the ruling Counts died out Hamaland became one of the core areas of the Dukes of Guelders, and thus became part of the Duchy of Guelders.

Italian War of 1542–1546

Italian War of 1542–46Italian War of 1542Treaty of Crépy
This alliance emboldened William to challenge Emperor Charles V's claim to Guelders, but the French, mightily engaged on multiple fronts as they were in the long struggle to against the Habsburg "encirclement" of France, proved less reliable than the Duke's ambitions required, and he was unable to hold on to the duchy; in 1543, by the terms of the Treaty of Venlo, Duke William conceded the Duchy of Guelders to the Emperor.
William, Duke of Jülich-Cleves-Berg, who was engaged in the Guelders Wars, a dispute with Charles over the succession in Guelders, sealed his alliance with Francis by marrying Francis's niece, Jeanne d'Albret.

Battle of Worringen

Battle of Woeringen
In the 12th and 13th century, Guelders quickly expanded downstream along the sides of the Maas, Rhine, and IJssel rivers and even claimed the succession in the Duchy of Limburg, until it lost the 1288 Battle of Worringen against Berg and Brabant.

Prussian Guelders

Upper Gueldersaccess to the Meuseportion of Guelders
At the Treaty of Utrecht, ending the War of the Spanish Succession in 1713, the Spanish Upper Quarter was again divided between Prussian Guelders (Geldern, Viersen, Horst, Venray), the United Provinces (Venlo, Montfort, Echt), Austria (Roermond, Niederkrüchten, Weert), and the Duchy of Jülich (Erkelenz).
Prussian Guelders or Prussian G(u)elderland (Pruisisch Gelre; Preußisch Geldern) was the part of the Duchy of Guelders ruled by the Kingdom of Prussia from 1713.