Guitar pick

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A guitar pick (American English) is a plectrum used for guitars.wikipedia
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Celluloid

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Picks are generally made of one uniform material—such as some kind of plastic (nylon, Delrin, celluloid), rubber, felt, tortoiseshell, wood, metal, glass, tagua, or stone.
Celluloid is highly flammable, difficult and expensive to produce and no longer widely used; its most common uses today are in table tennis balls, musical instruments, and guitar picks.

Tortoiseshell

tortoise shelltortoise-shelltortoise shells
Picks are generally made of one uniform material—such as some kind of plastic (nylon, Delrin, celluloid), rubber, felt, tortoiseshell, wood, metal, glass, tagua, or stone.
It was used, normally in thin slices or pieces, in the manufacture of a wide variety of items such as combs, small boxes and frames and inlays in furniture (known as Boulle Work carried out by André-Charles Boulle) and other items, frames for spectacles, guitar picks and knitting needles.

D'Andrea Picks

Most of today's guitar pick shapes were created by the company that made the first plastic pick in 1922, D'Andrea Picks.
Luigi D'Andrea made the world's very first plastic guitar pick out of celluloid in 1922.

Fingerstyle guitar

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Conversely, the many playing techniques that involve the fingers, such as those found in fingerstyle guitar, slapping, classical guitar, and flamenco guitar, can also yield an extremely broad variety of tones.
Bossa nova is most commonly performed on the nylon-string classical guitar, played with the fingers rather than with a pick.

Guitar

guitarslead guitarbass
A guitar pick (American English) is a plectrum used for guitars.
A "guitar pick" or "plectrum" is a small piece of hard material generally held between the thumb and first finger of the picking hand and is used to "pick" the strings.

Pick slide

pick scrapepick slidingscrape the pick
Many rock guitarists use a flourish (called a pick slide or pick scrape) that involves scraping the pick along the length of a round wound string (a round wound string is a string with a coil of round wire wrapped around the outside, used for the heaviest three or four strings on a guitar).
The technique is executed by holding the edge of the pick against any of the three or four wound strings and moving it along the string.

Plectrum

pickplectrapicked
A guitar pick (American English) is a plectrum used for guitars.

Plastic

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Picks are generally made of one uniform material—such as some kind of plastic (nylon, Delrin, celluloid), rubber, felt, tortoiseshell, wood, metal, glass, tagua, or stone.

Nylon

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Picks are generally made of one uniform material—such as some kind of plastic (nylon, Delrin, celluloid), rubber, felt, tortoiseshell, wood, metal, glass, tagua, or stone.

Natural rubber

rubberIndia rubbercaoutchouc
Picks are generally made of one uniform material—such as some kind of plastic (nylon, Delrin, celluloid), rubber, felt, tortoiseshell, wood, metal, glass, tagua, or stone.

Felt

feltingfelt hatscarroting
Picks are generally made of one uniform material—such as some kind of plastic (nylon, Delrin, celluloid), rubber, felt, tortoiseshell, wood, metal, glass, tagua, or stone.

Wood

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Picks are generally made of one uniform material—such as some kind of plastic (nylon, Delrin, celluloid), rubber, felt, tortoiseshell, wood, metal, glass, tagua, or stone.

Metal

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Picks are generally made of one uniform material—such as some kind of plastic (nylon, Delrin, celluloid), rubber, felt, tortoiseshell, wood, metal, glass, tagua, or stone.

Glass

glassmakersilicate glassvitreous
Picks are generally made of one uniform material—such as some kind of plastic (nylon, Delrin, celluloid), rubber, felt, tortoiseshell, wood, metal, glass, tagua, or stone.

Phytelephas

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Picks are generally made of one uniform material—such as some kind of plastic (nylon, Delrin, celluloid), rubber, felt, tortoiseshell, wood, metal, glass, tagua, or stone.

Rock (geology)

stonerockrocks
Picks are generally made of one uniform material—such as some kind of plastic (nylon, Delrin, celluloid), rubber, felt, tortoiseshell, wood, metal, glass, tagua, or stone.

Triangle

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They are often shaped in an acute isosceles triangle with the two equal corners rounded and the third corner less rounded.

Guitar chord

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They are used to strum chords or to sound individual notes on a guitar.

Quill

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Feather quills were likely the first standardized plectra and became widely used until the late 19th century.

Hawksbill sea turtle

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At that point, the shift towards what became the superior plectrum material took place; the outer shell casing of an Atlantic hawksbill sea turtle, which would colloquially be referred to as tortoiseshell.

Banjo

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Prior to the 1920s most guitar players used thumb and finger picks (used for the banjo or mandolin) when looking for something to play their guitar with, but with the rise of musician Nick Lucas, the use of a flat "plectrum style guitar pick" became popular.

Mandolin

mandolinistmandolinsBandolim
Prior to the 1920s most guitar players used thumb and finger picks (used for the banjo or mandolin) when looking for something to play their guitar with, but with the rise of musician Nick Lucas, the use of a flat "plectrum style guitar pick" became popular.

Nick Lucas

Prior to the 1920s most guitar players used thumb and finger picks (used for the banjo or mandolin) when looking for something to play their guitar with, but with the rise of musician Nick Lucas, the use of a flat "plectrum style guitar pick" became popular.

Cork (material)

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A more notable improvement was attaching cork to the wide part of the pick, a solution first patented by Richard Carpenter and Thomas Towner of Oakland in 1917.