Gulliver's Travels (1939 film)

Gulliver's Travels1939Gulliver's Travels'' (1939 film)Gulliver’s Travels
Gulliver's Travels is a 1939 American cel-animated Technicolor feature film produced by Max Fleischer and directed by Dave Fleischer for Fleischer Studios.wikipedia
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Technicolor

three-strip Technicolortwo-color Technicolortechnicolour
Gulliver's Travels is a 1939 American cel-animated Technicolor feature film produced by Max Fleischer and directed by Dave Fleischer for Fleischer Studios.
Technicolor became known and celebrated for its highly saturated color, and was initially most commonly used for filming musicals such as The Wizard of Oz (1939) and Down Argentine Way (1940), costume pictures such as The Adventures of Robin Hood (1938) and Gone with the Wind (1939), and animated films such as Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs (1937), Gulliver's Travels (1939), and Fantasia (1940).

Dave Fleischer

Dave
Gulliver's Travels is a 1939 American cel-animated Technicolor feature film produced by Max Fleischer and directed by Dave Fleischer for Fleischer Studios.
He also supervised two animated features Gulliver's Travels and Mr. Bug Goes to Town.

Fleischer Studios

FleischerFleischer brothersOut of the Inkwell Studios
Gulliver's Travels is a 1939 American cel-animated Technicolor feature film produced by Max Fleischer and directed by Dave Fleischer for Fleischer Studios. The film was Fleischer Studios' first feature-length animated film, as well as the second animated feature film produced by an American studio after Walt Disney Productions' Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs, as Paramount had commissioned the feature in response to the success of that film.
The new Fleischer Studio opened in October 1938, and production on its first feature, Gulliver's Travels (1939), went from the development stage begun in New York to active production in Miami.

Academy Award for Best Original Score

Best Original ScoreBest Music, Scoring of a Dramatic or Comedy PictureAcademy Award
The Gulliver's Travels score by Victor Young was nominated for a Best Original Score Academy Award while the song "Faithful/Forever" was nominated for Best Original Song, but both of them lost out to The Wizard of Oz with the film winning the latter category for the song "Over the Rainbow".

Academy Award for Best Original Song

Best Original SongBest SongAcademy Award
The Gulliver's Travels score by Victor Young was nominated for a Best Original Score Academy Award while the song "Faithful/Forever" was nominated for Best Original Song, but both of them lost out to The Wizard of Oz with the film winning the latter category for the song "Over the Rainbow".

Max Fleischer

MaxFleischerFleischer brothers
Gulliver's Travels is a 1939 American cel-animated Technicolor feature film produced by Max Fleischer and directed by Dave Fleischer for Fleischer Studios.
Jonathan Swift's classic, Gulliver's Travels was a favorite of Max's and pressed into production.

Willard Bowsky

The sequences for the film were directed by Seymour Kneitel, Willard Bowsky, Tom Palmer, Grim Natwick, William Henning, Roland Crandall, Thomas Johnson, Robert Leffingwell, Frank Kelling, Winfield Hoskins, and Orestes Calpini.
He went on to work on the Superman cartoons and the Fleischer Studios' two feature-length films, Gulliver's Travels and Mr. Bug Goes to Town.

Gulliver's Travels

Gullivernovel of the same nameGulliver in Lilliput
Released to cinemas in the United States on December 22, 1939 by Paramount Pictures, the story is a very loose adaptation of Jonathan Swift's 18th century novel of the same name, specifically the first part which tells the story of Lilliput and Blefuscu, and centers around an explorer who helps a small kingdom who declared war after an argument over a wedding song.
Gulliver's Travels (1939): Max Fleischer's animated feature-length classic of Gulliver's adventures in Lilliput. This was the first full-length animated cartoon after Walt Disney's Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs. The film was spun off into two cartoon short series: the Gabby cartoons about a Lilliputian sidekick of the film, and the Animated Antics cartoons starring Sneak, Snoop and Snitch (the three villains) and Twinkletoes (the carrier pigeon).

Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs (1937 film)

Snow White and the Seven DwarfsSnow WhiteSnow White and the Seven Dwarves
The film was Fleischer Studios' first feature-length animated film, as well as the second animated feature film produced by an American studio after Walt Disney Productions' Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs, as Paramount had commissioned the feature in response to the success of that film.
Another animation pioneer, Max Fleischer, decided to produce his animated feature film Gulliver's Travels in order to compete with Snow White.

Winston Sharples

All of the songs were written by Leo Robin and composed by Ralph Rainger with the exception of "It's a Hap-Hap-Happy Day", which was written by Sammy Timberg, Al Neiburg and Winston Sharples.
In 1938, Sharples composed "It's A Hap-Hap-Happy Day" for Max Fleischer's full-length animated musical production of Gulliver's Travels.

Famous Studios

Paramount Cartoon StudiosFamousanimation division
"It's a Hap-Hap-Happy Day" and "All's Well" later became standard themes used for Fleischer and Famous Studios cartoon scores, while "I Hear a Dream" was quite popular as well.
The studio moved its operations from New York City to Miami Beach, Florida in 1938, following union problems and the start of production on its first feature film, Gulliver's Travels (1939).

Jessica Dragonette

Princess Glory - Jessica Dragonette - Spoken Voice: Livonia Warren
And in 1939, she provided the voice of "Princess Glory" in the full color animated motion picture Gulliver's Travels.

Jack Mercer

King Little, Twinkletoes, Sneak, Snoop, Snitch - Jack Mercer
Mercer also did the voices of Wimpy, Poopdeck Pappy, Popeye's nephews, King Little, Twinkletoes the Carrier Pigeon, and the bumbling spies Sneak, Snoop, and Snitch in Fleischer's Gulliver's Travels, and a number of voices, including Mr. Bumble and Swat (the Fly) for Fleischer's Mister Bug Goes to Town, and the mad scientist in one of the Fleischer Superman cartoons.

Tedd Pierce

Ted Pierce
King Bombo - Tedd Pierce
Pierce also got occasional voice work in the shorts: he gave voice to King Bombo in Gulliver's Travels (1939), and the villainous C. Bagley Beetle in Mr. Bug Goes to Town (1941), in addition to writing on those films.

Cal Howard

Prince David - Singing Voice Lanny Ross - Spoken Voice: Cal Howard
In 1938, Howard left Warner Bros. with his friend Tedd Pierce to work for Max Fleischer's studio in Miami, and provided the speaking voice of Prince David in Fleischer's Gulliver's Travels.

Sammy Timberg

All of the songs were written by Leo Robin and composed by Ralph Rainger with the exception of "It's a Hap-Hap-Happy Day", which was written by Sammy Timberg, Al Neiburg and Winston Sharples.
He also contributed songs to two Fleischer feature-length animated films, Gulliver's Travels and Mr. Bug Goes to Town.

Grim Natwick

Myron "Grim" NatwickGrim" Natwick
The sequences for the film were directed by Seymour Kneitel, Willard Bowsky, Tom Palmer, Grim Natwick, William Henning, Roland Crandall, Thomas Johnson, Robert Leffingwell, Frank Kelling, Winfield Hoskins, and Orestes Calpini. Experienced lead animators were lured from Hollywood studios, including Nelson Demorest, Joe D'Igalo, and former Fleischer Animators Grim Natwick, Al Eugster, and Shamus Culhane, who returned after working for the Walt Disney Studios.
1939 Gulliver's Travels (animation director)

Rotoscoping

rotoscoperotoscopedrotoscoped animation
And while the majority of the characters were animated through conventional animation techniques, rotoscoping was used to animate Gulliver, Glory, and David.
Fleischer's last applications of rotoscope were for the realistic human animation required for the lead character—among others—in Gulliver's Travels (1939), and the human characters in his last feature, Mr. Bug Goes to Town (1941).

Tom Palmer (animator)

Tom Palmer
The sequences for the film were directed by Seymour Kneitel, Willard Bowsky, Tom Palmer, Grim Natwick, William Henning, Roland Crandall, Thomas Johnson, Robert Leffingwell, Frank Kelling, Winfield Hoskins, and Orestes Calpini.
His final credited work was as an animation director for the feature film Gulliver's Travels (1939) at Fleischer Studios.

Shamus Culhane

James CulhaneJames "Shamus" CulhaneJames (Shamus) Culhane
Experienced lead animators were lured from Hollywood studios, including Nelson Demorest, Joe D'Igalo, and former Fleischer Animators Grim Natwick, Al Eugster, and Shamus Culhane, who returned after working for the Walt Disney Studios.
While there, he worked as an animator on the films Gulliver's Travels and Mr. Bug Goes to Town.

Mr. Bug Goes to Town

Hoppity Goes to Town
This box office success prompted the order of a second feature set for a Christmas 1941 release Mr. Bug Goes to Town.
Fleischer Studios' first feature, Gulliver's Travels, did such impressive business in its first week that Paramount president Barney Balaban ordered another feature for a Christmas 1941 release.

Ralph Rainger

Rainger
All of the songs were written by Leo Robin and composed by Ralph Rainger with the exception of "It's a Hap-Hap-Happy Day", which was written by Sammy Timberg, Al Neiburg and Winston Sharples.
1939 - Gulliver's Travels, including the Academy Award nominated song "Faithful Forever"

Lanny Ross

Prince David - Singing Voice Lanny Ross - Spoken Voice: Cal Howard
1939 Gulliver's Travels animated feature film for which Lanny Ross provided the singing voice for the character Prince David.

Gabby (film series)

GabbyGabby Color CartoonsGabby'' film series
The film was spun off into two short-lived Fleischer cartoon short series: the Gabby series and the Animated Antics cartoons starring the three spies, Sneak, Snoop and Snitch and Twinkletoes (the carrier pigeon).
Gabby debuted as the town crier in the 1939 animated feature Gulliver’s Travels produced by Fleischer.