Gupta Empire

GuptaGupta periodGuptasGupta dynastyGupta eraGupta EmperorImperial GuptasIndiaGupta artGupta emperors
The Gupta Empire was an ancient Indian empire existing from the mid-to-late 3rd century CE to 543 CE.wikipedia
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Outline of ancient India

ancient Indiaancient Indianancient Indian subcontinent
The Gupta Empire was an ancient Indian empire existing from the mid-to-late 3rd century CE to 543 CE.
Ancient India is the Indian subcontinent from prehistoric times to the start of Medieval India, which is typically dated (when the term is still used) to the end of the Gupta Empire.

Samudragupta

Samudra GuptaSamudra-GuptaSamudragupta (340-380)
The ruling dynasty of the empire was founded by the king Sri Gupta; the most notable rulers of the dynasty were Chandragupta I, Samudragupta, and Chandragupta II alias Vikramaditya.
Samudragupta (Gupta script: Sa-mu-dra-gu-pta, r. c. 335/350-375 CE) was a ruler of the Gupta Empire of present-day India.

Chandragupta II

Chandragupta VikramadityaVikramadityaChandra Gupta II
The ruling dynasty of the empire was founded by the king Sri Gupta; the most notable rulers of the dynasty were Chandragupta I, Samudragupta, and Chandragupta II alias Vikramaditya.
Chandragupta II (Gupta script: Cha-ndra-gu-pta, r. c. 380), also known by his title Vikramaditya, was one of the most powerful emperors of the Gupta Empire in northern India.

Chandragupta I

Chandra Gupta IChandra-Gupta IChandragupta
The ruling dynasty of the empire was founded by the king Sri Gupta; the most notable rulers of the dynasty were Chandragupta I, Samudragupta, and Chandragupta II alias Vikramaditya. In the Allahabad Pillar inscription, Gupta and his successor Ghatotkacha are described as Maharaja ("great king"), while the next king Chandragupta I is called a Maharajadhiraja ("king of great kings").
Chandragupta I (Gupta script: Cha-ndra-gu-pta, r. c. 319-335 or 319-350 CE) was a king of the Gupta dynasty, who ruled in northern India.

Gupta (king)

GuptaMaharaja Sri-GuptaSri Gupta
The ruling dynasty of the empire was founded by the king Sri Gupta; the most notable rulers of the dynasty were Chandragupta I, Samudragupta, and Chandragupta II alias Vikramaditya. Gupta (Gupta script:, fl. late 3rd century CE) is the earliest known king of the dynasty: different historians variously date the beginning of his reign from mid-to-late 3rd century CE.
Gupta (Gupta script: Gu-pta, fl. late 3rd century CE) was the founder of the Gupta dynasty of northern India.

Vikramaditya

VikramādityaVikramaKalakacharya
The ruling dynasty of the empire was founded by the king Sri Gupta; the most notable rulers of the dynasty were Chandragupta I, Samudragupta, and Chandragupta II alias Vikramaditya.
Although Vikramaditya is mentioned in a few works dated to before the Gupta period (240–550 CE), portions (including Vikramaditya) may be later Gupta-era interpolations.

Golden Age of India

Indian Golden Age
This period is considered as the Golden Age of India by some historians.
One of such periods include the times between the 4th century and 6th century CE of Gupta Empire because of the large achievements Indians made in the fields of science, technology, engineering, art, dialectic, literature, logic, mathematics, astronomy, religion and philosophy during the Gupta Empire.

Mahabharata

MahābhārataMahabharatMahabharatha
The high points of this period are the great cultural developments which took place primarily during the reigns of Samudragupta, Chandragupta II and Kumaragupta I. Many of the literary sources, such as Mahabharata and Ramayana, were canonised during this period.
The text probably reached its final form by the early Gupta period (c.

Alchon Huns

AlchonAlchon HunAlchon Huna
The empire eventually died out because of many factors such as substantial loss of territory and imperial authority caused by their own erstwhile feudatories, as well as the invasion by the Huna peoples (Kidarites and Alchon Huns) from Central Asia.
The Alchon invasion of the Indian subcontinent eradicated the Kidarite Huns who had preceded them by about a century, and contributed to the fall of the Gupta Empire, in a sense bringing an end to Classical India.

Gupta script

GuptaGupta Brahmia Cursive Gupta script
Gupta (Gupta script:, fl. late 3rd century CE) is the earliest known king of the dynasty: different historians variously date the beginning of his reign from mid-to-late 3rd century CE.
The Gupta script (sometimes referred to as Gupta Brahmi Script or Late Brahmi Script) was used for writing Sanskrit and is associated with the Gupta Empire of India which was a period of material prosperity and great religious and scientific developments.

Uttar Pradesh

UPUttar Pradesh, IndiaU.P.
According to one theory, they originated in the present-day eastern Uttar Pradesh, where most of the inscriptions and coins of the early Gupta kings have been discovered.
Control over Gangetic plains region was of vital importance to the power and stability of all of India's major empires, including the Maurya (320–200 BC), Kushan (AD 100–250), Gupta (350–600), and Gurjara-Pratihara (650–1036) empires.

Maharaja

MaharajahMaharajadhirajaMaharani
In the Allahabad Pillar inscription, Gupta and his successor Ghatotkacha are described as Maharaja ("great king"), while the next king Chandragupta I is called a Maharajadhiraja ("king of great kings").
A few ruled mighty states informally called empires, including ruler Maharaja Ranjit Singh, founder of the Sikh Empire, and Maharaja Sri Gupta, founder of the ancient Indian Gupta Empire, but 'title inflation' soon led to most being rather mediocre or even petty in real power, while compound titles were among the attempts to distinguish some among their ranks.

Kacha (king)

Kacha
However, the discovery of the coins issued by a Gupta ruler named Kacha have led to some debate on this topic: according to one theory, Kacha was another name for Samudragupta; another possibility is that Kacha was a rival claimant to the throne.
Kacha (Gupta script: Kā-cha, IAST: Kāca, c. 4th century) was a king of India, possibly a member of the Gupta dynasty.

Allahabad pillar

Allahabad inscriptionAllahabad pillar inscriptionAllahabad pillar capital
In the Allahabad Pillar inscription, Gupta and his successor Ghatotkacha are described as Maharaja ("great king"), while the next king Chandragupta I is called a Maharajadhiraja ("king of great kings").
While it is one of the few extant pillars that carry his edicts, it is particularly notable for containing later inscriptions attributed to the Gupta emperor Samudragupta (4th century CE).

Nagas of Padmavati

NagaBhavanagaNaga kings
The inscription asserts that Samudragupta uprooted 8 kings of Aryavarta, the northern region, including the Nagas.
The Naga (IAST: Nāga) dynasty ruled parts of north-central India during the 3rd and the 4th centuries, after the decline of the Kushan Empire and before the rise of the Gupta Empire.

Kushan Empire

KushanKushansKushana
In the later period, the title Maharaja was used by feudatory rulers, which has led to suggestions that Gupta and Ghatotkacha were vassals (possibly of Kushan Empire).
In the 4th century, the Guptas, an Indian dynasty also pressed from the east.

Ghatotkacha (king)

GhatotkachaGhatôtkacha
In the Allahabad Pillar inscription, Gupta and his successor Ghatotkacha are described as Maharaja ("great king"), while the next king Chandragupta I is called a Maharajadhiraja ("king of great kings").
Ghatotkacha (Gupta script: Gha-to-tka-cha, IAST: Ghaṭotkaca, r. c. late 3rd century - early 4th century) was a pre-imperial Gupta king of northern India.

Arjunayanas

Arjunayana
The tribal oligarchies included Malavas, Arjunayanas, Yaudheyas, Madrakas, and Abhiras, among others.
335), the Arjunayanas figure among the autonomous political communities bordering on the Gupta Empire who accepted the overlordship of Samudragupta.

Kanchipuram

KanchiKancheepuramConjeevaram
The inscription suggests that Samudragupta advanced as far as the Pallava kingdom in the south, and defeated Vishnugopa, the Pallava regent of Kanchi.
The earliest inscription from the Gupta period (325–185 BCE) denote the city as Kanchipuram, where King Visnugopa was defeated by Samudragupta.

Bengal

Bengal regionBengal, IndiaBengali
Another prominent theory locates the Gupta homeland in the present-day Bengal region, based on the account of the 7th century Chinese Buddhist monk Yijing.
The region was ruled by Hindu, Buddhist and Jain dynasties, including the Mauryans, Guptas, Varmans, Khadgas, Palas, Chandras and Senas among others.

Eran

AirikinaErakinaEran, India
A large number of his copper coins also have been found from the Eran-Vidisha region and classified in five distinct types, which include the Garuda, Garudadhvaja, lion and border legend types.
Eran or Erakina was the capital of Erakina (Airikina) Pradesha or Airkina Vishaya, an administrative division of the Gupta empire.

Sanskrit

Sanskrit languageClassical SanskritSkt.
The 5th-century CE Sanskrit poet Kalidasa credits the Guptas with having conquered about twenty-one kingdoms, both in and outside India, including the kingdoms of Parasikas, the Hunas, the Kambojas, tribes located in the west and east Oxus valleys, the Kinnaras, Kiratas, and others.
Though no similar inscriptions are found for about two hundred years after the Rudradaman reign, it is important because its style is the prototype of the eulogy-style Sanskrit inscriptions found in the Gupta Empire era.

Yaudheya

YaudheyasYaudheya Republic
The tribal oligarchies included Malavas, Arjunayanas, Yaudheyas, Madrakas, and Abhiras, among others.
The Yaudheya Republic flourished up to the middle to the 4th century when it was conquered by Samudragupta and incorporated into the Gupta Empire.

Malavas

Malava tribeMalava EmpireMalli
The tribal oligarchies included Malavas, Arjunayanas, Yaudheyas, Madrakas, and Abhiras, among others.
Their power gradually declined as a result of defeats against the Western Satraps (2nd century CE), the Gupta emperor Samudragupta (4th century), and the Chalukya emperor Pulakeshin II (7th century).

Gujarat

Gujarat StateGujarat, IndiaGujrat
Chandragupta II expanded his realm westwards, defeating the Saka Western Kshatrapas of Malwa, Gujarat and Saurashtra in a campaign lasting until 409.
Gujarat's coastal cities, chiefly Bharuch and Khambhat, served as ports and trading centres in the Maurya and Gupta empires, and during the succession of royal Saka dynasties from the Western Satraps era.