Gurkha

GorkhaGurkhasGorkhasGorkhaliGhurkaGoorkhaGorakhaGorkha BrigadeGurkaGurkha Rifles
The Gurkhas or Gorkhas with endonym Gorkhali are soldiers native to the Indian subcontinent of Nepalese nationality and ethnic Nepalis of Indian nationality recruited for the British Army, Nepalese Army, Indian Army, Gurkha Contingent Singapore, Gurkha Reserve Unit Brunei, UN peacekeeping force and war zones around the world.wikipedia
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Indian Gorkha

GorkhaNepaliNepalese
The Gurkhas or Gorkhas with endonym Gorkhali are soldiers native to the Indian subcontinent of Nepalese nationality and ethnic Nepalis of Indian nationality recruited for the British Army, Nepalese Army, Indian Army, Gurkha Contingent Singapore, Gurkha Reserve Unit Brunei, UN peacekeeping force and war zones around the world.
The term "Indian Gorkha" is used to differentiate the Gorkhas of India from the citizens of Nepal.

Gurkha Contingent

Hat Terrai GurkhaGurkhaGurkha Contingent Singapore
The Gurkhas or Gorkhas with endonym Gorkhali are soldiers native to the Indian subcontinent of Nepalese nationality and ethnic Nepalis of Indian nationality recruited for the British Army, Nepalese Army, Indian Army, Gurkha Contingent Singapore, Gurkha Reserve Unit Brunei, UN peacekeeping force and war zones around the world.
The Gurkha Contingent (GC) is a line department of the Singapore Police Force consisting primarily of Gurkhas from Nepal.

Prithvi Narayan Shah

Prithivi Narayan ShahKing Prithvi Narayan ShahKing Prithivi Narayan Shah
Historically, the terms "Gurkha" and "Gorkhali" were synonymous with "Nepali", which originates from the hill principality Gorkha Kingdom, from which the Kingdom of Nepal expanded under Prithivi Narayan Shah.
He claimed to be a Gorkhali monarch of Rajput origin from medieval India.

Nepalese Army

Nepal ArmyRoyal Nepalese ArmyNepali Army
The Gurkhas or Gorkhas with endonym Gorkhali are soldiers native to the Indian subcontinent of Nepalese nationality and ethnic Nepalis of Indian nationality recruited for the British Army, Nepalese Army, Indian Army, Gurkha Contingent Singapore, Gurkha Reserve Unit Brunei, UN peacekeeping force and war zones around the world.
Apart from the standard Malla era temples in Kathmandu, the army being organized in Gorkha needed technicians and experts had to be brought in from abroad to manufacture war materials.

Kukri

KhukuriKhukrikukri knife
Gurkhas are closely associated with the khukuri, a forward-curving Nepali knife, and have a reputation for fearless military prowess.
The kukri or khukuri (खुकुरी khukuri) is a knife, originating from the Indian subcontinent, associated with the Nepali speaking Gurkhas of Nepal and India.

Mercenary

mercenariessoldier of fortunemercenary soldier
Although they meet many of the requirements of Article 47 of Protocol I of the Geneva Conventions regarding mercenaries, they are exempt under clauses 47(e) and (f) similarly to the French Foreign Legion.
The better-known combat units in which foreign nationals serve in another country's armed forces are the Gurkha regiments of the British Army and the Indian Army, and the French Foreign Legion.

Indian Army

ArmyIndianIndia
The Gurkhas or Gorkhas with endonym Gorkhali are soldiers native to the Indian subcontinent of Nepalese nationality and ethnic Nepalis of Indian nationality recruited for the British Army, Nepalese Army, Indian Army, Gurkha Contingent Singapore, Gurkha Reserve Unit Brunei, UN peacekeeping force and war zones around the world. Former Indian Army Chief of Staff Field Marshal Sam Manekshaw once stated that: "If a man says he is not afraid of dying, he is either lying or he is a Gurkha."
Upon independence and the subsequent Partition of India in 1947, four of the ten Gurkha regiments were transferred to the British Army.

2nd King Edward VII's Own Gurkha Rifles (The Sirmoor Rifles)

2nd Gurkha Rifles2nd King Edward VII's Own Gurkha Rifles2nd King Edward's Own Gurkha Rifles (The Sirmoor Rifles)
As well as Ochterlony’s Gurkha battalions, Fraser and Lt. Frederick Young raised the Sirmoor battalion, later to become the 2nd King Edward VII's Own Gurkha Rifles; an additional battalion—the Kumaon—was also raised, eventually becoming the 3rd Queen Alexandra's Own Gurkha Rifles.
This was the first Gurkha unit in the service of the East India Company to see action, during the 3rd Mahratta War in 1817.

Frederick Young (East India Company officer)

Frederick YoungCaptain Frederick YoungLieutenant Frederick Young
As well as Ochterlony’s Gurkha battalions, Fraser and Lt. Frederick Young raised the Sirmoor battalion, later to become the 2nd King Edward VII's Own Gurkha Rifles; an additional battalion—the Kumaon—was also raised, eventually becoming the 3rd Queen Alexandra's Own Gurkha Rifles.
Frederick Young (1786–1874) was the founder of the Sirmoor Battalion later 2nd King Edward VII's Own Gurkha Rifles (The Sirmoor Rifles), the first Gurkha regiment to fight for the British.

Gurkha Reserve Unit

Gurkha Reserve Unit Brunei
The Gurkhas or Gorkhas with endonym Gorkhali are soldiers native to the Indian subcontinent of Nepalese nationality and ethnic Nepalis of Indian nationality recruited for the British Army, Nepalese Army, Indian Army, Gurkha Contingent Singapore, Gurkha Reserve Unit Brunei, UN peacekeeping force and war zones around the world.
It was formed in 1974 and maintains approximately 2,000 Gurkhas.

Gurung people

GurungGurungsGurung zodiac
As a result, they discouraged the inclusion of Thakuri and Khas groups in the Gorkha units and refused to recruit tribes other than Gurungs and Magars in the Gorkha units.
When the British Empire came to South Asia, the Gurung people began serving the British in Army regiments of Gurkhas.

British Indian Army

Indian ArmyIndianreforms
During the Indian Rebellion of 1857, Gurkhas fought on the British side and became part of the British Indian Army on its formation.
After 'the Mutiny', recruitment switched to what the British called the "martial races," particularly Sikhs, Awans, Gakhars, and other Punjabi Musulmans, Baloch, Pashtuns, Marathas, Bunts, Nairs, Rajputs, Ahirs, Kumaonis, Gurkhas, Garhwalis, Janjuas, Maravars, Vellalar, Dogras, Jats, Gurjar, Mahars and Sainis.

Indian Rebellion of 1857

Indian MutinyIndian RebellionSepoy Mutiny
During the Indian Rebellion of 1857, Gurkhas fought on the British side and became part of the British Indian Army on its formation.
The border dispute between Nepal and British India, which sharpened after 1801, had caused the Anglo-Nepalese War of 1814–16 and brought the defeated Gurkhas under British influence.

Queen's Truncheon

In 1863 Queen Victoria presented the regiment with the Queen's Truncheon, as a replacement for the colours that rifle regiments do not usually have.
The top represents the minaret of Delhi Palace with three Gurkhas standing on it supporting the Queen's crown above their heads.

British expedition to Tibet

Younghusband ExpeditionBritish invasion of Tibet1904 invasion of Tibet
From the end of the Indian Rebellion of 1857 until the start of World War I, the Gurkha Regiments saw active service in Burma, Afghanistan, the North-East Frontier and the North-West Frontiers of India, Malta (the Russo-Turkish War, 1877–78), Cyprus, Malaya, China (the Boxer Rebellion of 1900) and Tibet (Younghusband's Expedition of 1905).
The British authorities, anticipating the problems of high altitude conflict, included many Gurkha and Pathan troops from mountainous regions such as Nepal; six companies of the 23rd Sikh Pioneers, four companies of the 8th Gurkhas in reserve at Gnatong in Sikkim, and two Gurkha companies guarding the British camp at Khamba Jong were involved.

Gorakhnath

GorakshanathGuru GorakhnathGoraksha Sataka
The name may be traced to the medieval Hindu warrior-saint Guru Gorakhnath who has a historic shrine in Gorkha.
The Gurkhas of Nepal and Indian Gorkhas take their name from this saint.

Kingdom of Nepal

NepalKingdom of Gorkhamonarchy
Historically, the terms "Gurkha" and "Gorkhali" were synonymous with "Nepali", which originates from the hill principality Gorkha Kingdom, from which the Kingdom of Nepal expanded under Prithivi Narayan Shah.
Nepal receives US$50 million a year through the Gurkha soldiers who serve in the Indian and British armies and are highly esteemed for their skill and bravery.

Gorkha Kingdom

GorkhaGorkhaliNepal
Historically, the terms "Gurkha" and "Gorkhali" were synonymous with "Nepali", which originates from the hill principality Gorkha Kingdom, from which the Kingdom of Nepal expanded under Prithivi Narayan Shah.
Not to be confused with the inhabitants of the old Gorkha Kingdom only, the Gurkhas are also military units in the British or the Indian army (where they are known as Gorkhas) enlisted in Nepal and India.

4th Gorkha Rifles

4th Gurkha Rifles4th Prince of Wales's Own Gurkha Rifles4 Gorkha Rifles
The 4th Gorkha Rifles or the Fourth Gorkha Rifles, abbreviated as 4 GR, is an infantry regiment of the Indian Army comprising Gurkha soldiers of Indian and Nepalese nationality, especially Magars and Gurungs hill tribes of Nepal.

Brigade of Gurkhas

GurkhasGurkha RegimentGurkha
Brigade of Gurkhas is the collective name which refers to all the units in the British Army that are composed of Nepalese Gurkha soldiers.

Sam Manekshaw

Field Marshal Sam ManekshawManekshawSam Maneckshaw
Former Indian Army Chief of Staff Field Marshal Sam Manekshaw once stated that: "If a man says he is not afraid of dying, he is either lying or he is a Gurkha."
Popular with Gurkha soldiers, Nepal fêted Manekshaw as an honorary general of the Nepalese Army in 1972.

11th Gurkha Rifles

11th Gurkhas
The 11th Gurkha Rifles was a Gurkha regiment of the British Indian Army.

10th Princess Mary's Own Gurkha Rifles

10th Gurkha Rifles1/10 Gurkhas1/10th Gurkha Rifles
The Kubo (Kabaw) Valley Military Police were raised on 9 April 1887 by Sir F.B. Norman (OC Eastern Frontier Brigade) at Manipur in India and was composed in equal numbers of Gurkha recruits and Assam hillmen.

Magars

MagarMagar peopleMagar community
As a result, they discouraged the inclusion of Thakuri and Khas groups in the Gorkha units and refused to recruit tribes other than Gurungs and Magars in the Gorkha units.
The Magars are well represented in Nepal's military, as well as in the Singapore Police Force, the British and Indian Gurkha regiments.

6th Queen Elizabeth's Own Gurkha Rifles

6th Gurkha Rifles6th42nd Gurkha Rifles
Initially the unit did not recruit from the Gurkhas, although after being transferred to the British Indian Army following the Indian Rebellion of 1857, it became a purely Gurkha regiment, in due course with its regimental headquarters at Abbottabad in the North West Frontier Province of British India.