Gustáv Husák

HusákGustav HusákHusakianPresident Husák
Gustáv Husák (10 January 1913 – 18 November 1991) was a Slovak politician, president of Czechoslovakia and a long-term Secretary General of the Communist Party of Czechoslovakia (1969–1987).wikipedia
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Prague Spring

invasion of CzechoslovakiaSoviet invasion of CzechoslovakiaCzechoslovakia
His rule is known as the period of the so-called "Normalization" after the Prague Spring. In April 1968, during the Prague Spring under new party leader and fellow Slovak Alexander Dubček, Husák became a vice-premier of Czechoslovakia, responsible for overseeing reforms in Slovakia.
Gustáv Husák, who replaced Dubček as First Secretary and also became President, reversed almost all of the reforms.

Normalization (Czechoslovakia)

normalizationnormalisationNormalization period
His rule is known as the period of the so-called "Normalization" after the Prague Spring.
Some historians date the period from the signing of the Moscow Protocol by Dubček and the other jailed Czechoslovak leaders on August 26, 1968, while others date it from the replacement of Dubček by Gustáv Husák on April 17, 1969, followed by the official normalization policies referred to as Husakism.

Dúbravka, Bratislava

DúbravkaPozsonyhidegkútDúbravka, Slovakia
Gustáv Husák was born as a son of an unemployed worker in Pozsonyhidegkút, Pozsony County, Kingdom of Hungary, Austria-Hungary (now part of Bratislava, Slovakia as Dúbravka).
Gustáv Husák, president of Czechoslovakia, was born here on 10 October 1913, he is buried at the Dúbravka cemetery

Leopoldov Prison

prison
In 1950, he fell victim to a Stalinist purge of the party leadership, and was sentenced to life imprisonment, spending the years from 1954 to 1960 in the Leopoldov Prison.
Once the largest prison in the Kingdom of Hungary, in the 20th century it became known for housing political prisoners under the communist regime, notably the future communist President of Czechoslovakia Gustáv Husák.

Alexander Dubček

DubčekAlexander DubcekDubcek
In April 1968, during the Prague Spring under new party leader and fellow Slovak Alexander Dubček, Husák became a vice-premier of Czechoslovakia, responsible for overseeing reforms in Slovakia.
Dubček resigned in April 1969 and was succeeded by Gustav Husák, who initiated normalization.

Communist Party of Czechoslovakia

Communist PartyCommunistKSČ
In 1933, when he started his studies at the Law Faculty of the Comenius University in Bratislava, he joined the Communist Party of Czechoslovakia (KSČ) which was banned from 1938 to 1945. Supported by Moscow, he was appointed leader of the Communist Party of Slovakia in as early as August 1968, and he succeeded Dubček as first secretary (title changed to general secretary in 1971) of the Communist Party of Czechoslovakia in April 1969.
In April 1969, Dubček lost the General Secretaryship (replaced by Gustáv Husák) and was expelled in 1970.

List of Presidents of Czechoslovakia

PresidentPresident of CzechoslovakiaPresidents
Gustáv Husák (10 January 1913 – 18 November 1991) was a Slovak politician, president of Czechoslovakia and a long-term Secretary General of the Communist Party of Czechoslovakia (1969–1987).
However, three general secretaries (Klement Gottwald, Antonín Novotný and Gustáv Husák) also served as president at some point in their tenures.

Czechoslovakia

CzechoslovakCzechTCH
As part of the De-Stalinization period in Czechoslovakia, Husák's conviction was overturned and his party membership restored in 1963.
Gustáv Husák was elected first secretary of the KSČ in 1969 (changed to general secretary in 1971) and president of Czechoslovakia in 1975.

Antonín Novotný

NovotnýAntonín Novotný Jr.Novotny
It is generally acknowledged that the then party leader and president Antonín Novotný repeatedly declined to pardon Husák, assuring his comrades that "you do not know what he is capable of if he comes to power".
However, his political influence was minimal and he was too ill to be a strong force in the Gustáv Husák administration.

Communist Party of Slovakia (1939)

Communist Party of SlovakiaCommunist PartyKSS
Supported by Moscow, he was appointed leader of the Communist Party of Slovakia in as early as August 1968, and he succeeded Dubček as first secretary (title changed to general secretary in 1971) of the Communist Party of Czechoslovakia in April 1969.
1968–1969: Gustáv Husák

Velvet Revolution

fall of communismfall of the communist regime1989
1989 (10 December): resigned as the President of Czechoslovakia within the Velvet Revolution
On 10 December, President Gustáv Husák appointed the first largely non-communist government in Czechoslovakia since 1948, and resigned.

Erich Honecker

HoneckerexpulsionFirst Secretary Erich Honecker)
Indeed, on the cultural level the level of repression approached that seen in Erich Honecker's East Germany and even Nicolae Ceauşescu's Romania.
Gorbachev grew to dislike Honecker, and by 1988 was lumping him in with Bulgaria's Todor Zhivkov, Czechoslovakia's Gustáv Husák and Romania's Nicolae Ceaușescu as a "Gang of Four"—a group of inflexible hardliners unwilling to make necessary reforms.

Miloš Jakeš

Jakeš
Later that year, however, Husák yielded his post as general secretary to Miloš Jakeš in response to a desire for younger leaders (Jakeš and Ladislav Adamec) to share in power.
Following the ouster of Gustáv Husák at a dramatic party meeting in December 1987, Jakeš was nominated for the position of General Secretary by the competing factions within the Communist Party of Czechoslovakia.

Lubomír Štrougal

Štrougal
While the hardliners, led by Vasil Bilak, opposed any restructuring, moderates led by Prime Minister Lubomir Strougal strongly favoured reform.
At first he refused the 1968 Occupation of Czechoslovakia by the Warsaw Pact forces, but later became one of the prominent representatives of Gustáv Husák‘s regime.

Husakism

Husakism
Husakism (husákismus; husákizmus) is an ideology connected with the Communist Slovak and Czechoslovak politician Gustáv Husák which has two different meanings and it was first used by Karol Bacílek to denounce the alleged "bourgeois nationalism" of Husák in 1950s.

Husák's Children

Husák's Children
The generation was named after the President and a long-term Communist leader of Czechoslovakia, Gustáv Husák.

Hero of the Soviet Union

Heroes of the Soviet UnionGold StarHeroine of the Soviet Union
Gustáv Husák was awarded the title Hero of the Soviet Union on 9 January 1983.
Gustáv Husák (Slovak) – communist president of Czechoslovakia

History of Czechoslovakia

CzechoslovakiaCzechoslovak Czechoslovakia
1950: charged with "bourgeois nationalism" with respect to Slovakia (see History of Czechoslovakia)
Dubček was removed as party First Secretary on 17 April 1969, and replaced by another Slovak, Gustáv Husák.

Communism

communistcommunistscommunist ideology
Gustáv Husák (10 January 1913 – 18 November 1991) was a Slovak politician, president of Czechoslovakia and a long-term Secretary General of the Communist Party of Czechoslovakia (1969–1987).

Pozsony County

PozsonyPressburgBratislava
Gustáv Husák was born as a son of an unemployed worker in Pozsonyhidegkút, Pozsony County, Kingdom of Hungary, Austria-Hungary (now part of Bratislava, Slovakia as Dúbravka).

Kingdom of Hungary

HungaryHungarianHungarians
Gustáv Husák was born as a son of an unemployed worker in Pozsonyhidegkút, Pozsony County, Kingdom of Hungary, Austria-Hungary (now part of Bratislava, Slovakia as Dúbravka).

Austria-Hungary

Austro-HungarianAustro-Hungarian EmpireAustrian
Gustáv Husák was born as a son of an unemployed worker in Pozsonyhidegkút, Pozsony County, Kingdom of Hungary, Austria-Hungary (now part of Bratislava, Slovakia as Dúbravka).

Bratislava

PressburgPozsonyPreßburg
Gustáv Husák was born as a son of an unemployed worker in Pozsonyhidegkút, Pozsony County, Kingdom of Hungary, Austria-Hungary (now part of Bratislava, Slovakia as Dúbravka).

Slovakia

🇸🇰SlovakSVK
Gustáv Husák was born as a son of an unemployed worker in Pozsonyhidegkút, Pozsony County, Kingdom of Hungary, Austria-Hungary (now part of Bratislava, Slovakia as Dúbravka).

Comenius University

Univerzita KomenskéhoComenius University BratislavaUniversity of Bratislava
In 1933, when he started his studies at the Law Faculty of the Comenius University in Bratislava, he joined the Communist Party of Czechoslovakia (KSČ) which was banned from 1938 to 1945.