Gustav A. Hedlund

Gustav HedlundG. A. HedlundHedlund, Gustav A.
Gustav Arnold Hedlund (May 7, 1904 – March 15, 1993), an American mathematician, was one of the founders of symbolic and topological dynamics.wikipedia
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Symbolic dynamics

symbolicCategorical dynamicsdynamic
Gustav Arnold Hedlund (May 7, 1904 – March 15, 1993), an American mathematician, was one of the founders of symbolic and topological dynamics.
Related work was done by Emil Artin in 1924 (for the system now called Artin billiard), Pekka Myrberg, Paul Koebe, Jakob Nielsen, G. A. Hedlund.

Marston Morse

H. C. Marston MorseH. Marston MorseHarold Calvin Marston Morse
He was a student of Marston Morse, under whose supervision he received a Ph.D. in 1930 with thesis entitled "I. Geodesics on a Two-Dimensional Riemannian Manifold with Periodic Coefficients II. Poincare's Rotation Number and Morse's Type Number".

Topological dynamics

topological dynamical systemtopological dynamical systemstopological methods
Gustav Arnold Hedlund (May 7, 1904 – March 15, 1993), an American mathematician, was one of the founders of symbolic and topological dynamics.

Walter Gottschalk

Gottschalk, Walter
He has over 200 academic descendants, many of them through two of his students at Virginia, Walter Gottschalk and W. Roy Utz, Jr.
Gottschalk did both his undergraduate studies and graduate studies at the University of Virginia, finishing with a Ph.D. in 1944 under the supervision of Gustav A. Hedlund.

Curtis–Hedlund–Lyndon theorem

translation-invariant and continuous
The Curtis–Hedlund–Lyndon theorem, a topological characterization of cellular automata, is named after Hedlund.
It is named after Morton L. Curtis, Gustav A. Hedlund, and Roger Lyndon; in his 1969 paper stating the theorem, Hedlund credited Curtis and Lyndon as co-discoverers.

Cellular automaton

cellular automataCACell games (cellular automaton)
The Curtis–Hedlund–Lyndon theorem, a topological characterization of cellular automata, is named after Hedlund.
In 1969, Gustav A. Hedlund compiled many results following this point of view in what is still considered as a seminal paper for the mathematical study of cellular automata.

Roger Lyndon

Roger C. LyndonR. C. LyndonLyndon
Hedlund first published this theorem in 1969, crediting Morton L. Curtis and Roger Lyndon as co-discoverers.
Lyndon was credited by Gustav A. Hedlund for his role in the discovery of the Curtis–Hedlund–Lyndon theorem, a mathematical characterization of cellular automata in terms of continuous equivariant functions on shift spaces.

Morton L. Curtis

Curtis, Morton L.M. L. Curtis
Hedlund first published this theorem in 1969, crediting Morton L. Curtis and Roger Lyndon as co-discoverers.
Together with Gustav A. Hedlund and Roger Lyndon, he proved the Curtis–Hedlund–Lyndon theorem characterizing cellular automata as being defined by continuous equivariant functions on a shift space.

Mathematician

mathematiciansapplied mathematicianMathematics
Gustav Arnold Hedlund (May 7, 1904 – March 15, 1993), an American mathematician, was one of the founders of symbolic and topological dynamics.

Somerville, Massachusetts

SomervilleSomerville, MAWest Somerville, Massachusetts
Hedlund was born May 7, 1904, in Somerville, Massachusetts.

Harvard University

HarvardHarvard CollegeUniversity of Harvard
He did his undergraduate studies at Harvard University, earned a master's degree from Columbia University, and returned to Harvard for his doctoral studies.

Columbia University

ColumbiaColumbia CollegeUniversity of Columbia
He did his undergraduate studies at Harvard University, earned a master's degree from Columbia University, and returned to Harvard for his doctoral studies.

Hunter College

Hunter College of the City University of New YorkCUNY Hunter CollegeHunter
While still studying at Columbia, Hedlund taught at Hunter College, and after receiving his doctorate he took a position at Bryn Mawr College, where he remained for nine years.

Bryn Mawr College

Bryn MawrBryn Mawr College LibraryBryn Mawr Alumnae Association
While still studying at Columbia, Hedlund taught at Hunter College, and after receiving his doctorate he took a position at Bryn Mawr College, where he remained for nine years.

University of Virginia

VirginiaUniversity of Virginia at CharlottesvilleThe University of Virginia
From 1939 to 1948 he taught at the University of Virginia, after which he moved to Yale University.

Yale University

YaleYale CollegeUniversity of Yale
From 1939 to 1948 he taught at the University of Virginia, after which he moved to Yale University.

Institute for Advanced Study

Institute for Advanced StudiesInstitute for Advanced Study, PrincetonIAS
He was also a member of the Institute for Advanced Study in Princeton, New Jersey, which he visited in 1933, 1938, and 1953.

Princeton, New Jersey

PrincetonPrinceton, NJPrinceton, N.J.
He was also a member of the Institute for Advanced Study in Princeton, New Jersey, which he visited in 1933, 1938, and 1953.

Wesleyan University

WesleyanDavison Art CenterCollege of Social Studies
He retired from Yale in 1972, but afterwards held a visiting professorship at Wesleyan University.

Academic genealogy

academic descendantsscientific genealogyacademic ancestor
He has over 200 academic descendants, many of them through two of his students at Virginia, Walter Gottschalk and W. Roy Utz, Jr.

Ergodicity

ergodicergodic measurenon-ergodic
One of Hedlund's early results was an important theorem about the ergodicity of geodesic flows.

Geodesic

geodesicsgeodesic flowgeodesic equation
One of Hedlund's early results was an important theorem about the ergodicity of geodesic flows.

Sigma Xi

Scientific Research Society of AmericaSigma Xi SocietySigma Xi, The Scientific Research Society
Hedlund was elected to Sigma Xi in 1943.

Festschrift

FestschriftenGedenkschriftliber amicorum
The editor of the festschrift from the conference, Anatole Beck, wrote that it was "our token of respect to the man who did so much to foster and build this field".

Anatole Beck

Beck, Anatole
The editor of the festschrift from the conference, Anatole Beck, wrote that it was "our token of respect to the man who did so much to foster and build this field".