Guy Carleton, 1st Baron Dorchester

Guy CarletonSir Guy CarletonLord DorchesterCarletonDorchesterGeneral Guy CarletonGovernor CarletonGen. Guy CarletonGeneral CarletonGovernor Guy Carleton
Guy Carleton, 1st Baron Dorchester, KB (3 September 1724 – 10 November 1808), known between 1776 and 1786 as Sir Guy Carleton, was an Anglo-Irish soldier and administrator.wikipedia
410 Related Articles

Battle of Quebec (1775)

Battle of QuebecQuebecsiege of Quebec
He commanded British troops in the American War of Independence, first leading the defence of Quebec during the 1775 rebel invasion and the 1776 counteroffensive that drove the rebels from the province.
The city's garrison, a motley assortment of regular troops and militia led by Quebec's provincial governor, General Guy Carleton, suffered a small number of casualties.

Invasion of Quebec (1775)

invasion of Canadainvasion of QuebecInvasion of Canada (1775)
He commanded British troops in the American War of Independence, first leading the defence of Quebec during the 1775 rebel invasion and the 1776 counteroffensive that drove the rebels from the province.
One expedition left Fort Ticonderoga under Richard Montgomery, besieged and captured Fort St. Johns, and very nearly captured British General Guy Carleton when taking Montreal.

Commander-in-Chief, North America

Commander-in-Chiefcommander-in-chief for North AmericaCommander-in-Chief in North America
In 1782 and 1783 he led as the commander-in-chief of all British forces in North America.
The post's responsibilities were then divided: Major-General William Howe became Commander-in-Chief, America, responsible for British troops from West Florida to Newfoundland, and General Guy Carleton became Commander-in-Chief, Quebec, responsible for the defence of the Province of Quebec.

Baron Dorchester

Baroness DorchesterArthur Henry Carleton, 2nd Lord Dorchester
The title Baron Dorchester was created on 21 August 1786.
The first creation came in the Peerage of Great Britain on 21 August 1786 when the soldier and administrator Sir Guy Carleton was made Lord Dorchester, Baron of Dorchester (on Thames), in the County of Oxford.

Thomas Carleton

General CarletonGovernor Thomas Carleton
The military and political career of his younger brother, Thomas Carleton, was interwoven with his own, and Thomas served under him in the Canadas.
Born in Strabane, Co. Tyrone, Ireland to Christoper Carleton and his wife Catherine Ball, he was the younger brother of Guy Carleton, 1st Baron Dorchester.

Loyalist (American Revolution)

LoyalistLoyalistsTories
In this capacity he was notable for carrying out the Crown's promise of freedom to slaves who joined the British, and he oversaw the evacuation of British forces, Loyalists and more than 3,000 freedmen from New York City in 1783 to transport them to a British colony.
The British honored the pledge of freedom in New York City through the efforts of General Guy Carleton who recorded the names of African Americans who had supported the British in a document called the Book of Negroes which granted freedom to slaves who had escaped and assisted the British.

Book of Negroes

The Book of Negroes3,000 former slavesa historical document of the same name
Toward this end, Carleton assigned Samuel Birch to create the Book of Negroes.
The book was assembled by Samuel Birch, the namesake of Birchtown, Nova Scotia, under the direction of Guy Carleton, 1st Baron Dorchester.

Province of Quebec (1763–1791)

Province of QuebecQuebecBritish Province of Quebec
He twice served as Governor of the Province of Quebec, from 1768 to 1778, concurrently serving as Governor General of British North America in that time, and again from 1785 to 1795.

American Revolutionary War

Revolutionary WarAmerican War of IndependenceAmerican Revolution
He commanded British troops in the American War of Independence, first leading the defence of Quebec during the 1775 rebel invasion and the 1776 counteroffensive that drove the rebels from the province.
Henry Clinton was recalled and was replaced by Guy Carleton who was under orders to suspend offensive operations.

Governor General of Canada

Governor GeneralGovernor-General of CanadaGovernor-General
He twice served as Governor of the Province of Quebec, from 1768 to 1778, concurrently serving as Governor General of British North America in that time, and again from 1785 to 1795.
The post was created in 1786, with The Lord Dorchester as its first occupant.

Samuel Birch (military officer)

Samuel Birch
Toward this end, Carleton assigned Samuel Birch to create the Book of Negroes.
General Guy Carleton appointed Birch to determine which Blacks had earned their freedom as Loyalist soldiers.

James Wolfe

General WolfeWolfeGeneral James Wolfe
During this period he became a friend of James Wolfe; he may have served with Wolfe at the Battle of Culloden during the Jacobite rising of 1745.
He insisted on the choice of his friend, the Irish officer Guy Carleton as Quartermaster General and threatened to resign the command should his friend not have been chosen.

Battle of Trois-Rivières

Trois-Rivièresattempt against British troops at Trois-RivièresBattle of Three Rivers
Guy Carleton launched a counteroffensive against the rebels, which included repelling an attempted attack on Trois-Rivières.
A British army under Quebec Governor Guy Carleton defeated an attempt by units from the Continental Army under the command of Brigadier General William Thompson to stop a British advance up the Saint Lawrence River valley.

Battle of Valcour Island

Valcour IslandLake ChamplainBattle of Valcour
The next month Carleton commanded British naval forces on the Richelieu River, culminating in the Battle of Valcour Island on Lake Champlain in October 1776 against a rebel fleet led by General Benedict Arnold.
Most of the ships in the American fleet under the command of Benedict Arnold were captured or destroyed by a British force under the overall direction of General Guy Carleton.

Siege of Fort St. Jean

Battle of Fort St. Jeanbesieging Fort Saint-Jeanbattle of St. Johns
In September, the Continental Army began its invasion and besieged the fort.
Beset by illness, bad weather, and logistical problems, they established mortar batteries that were able to penetrate into the interior of the fort, but the defenders, who were well-supplied with munitions, but not food and other supplies, persisted in their defence, believing the siege would be broken by forces from Montreal under General Guy Carleton.

Christopher Carleton

Christopher
His brother Thomas and nephew Christopher both served on his staff during the campaign.
Christopher's parents died at sea when he was only four years old and his uncles Guy Carleton, 1st Baron Dorchester, the future Governor General of Canada and Commander-in-Chief, North America, along with Sir Thomas Carleton, the 1st Governor of New Brunswick, saw to his education and upbringing.

John Campbell, of Strachur

John CampbellJohn Campbell (of Strachur)John Campbell of Strachur
John Campbell of Strachur succeeded him as Commander-in-Chief, North America, although the post was then much reduced in scope.
General John Campbell, 17th Chief of MacArthur Campbells of Strachur (1727 – 28 August 1806) was a Scottish soldier and nobleman, who commanded the British forces at the Siege of Pensacola, and succeeded Guy Carleton, 1st Baron Dorchester as Commander-in-Chief in North America in 1783 following the end of the American War of Independence.

Francis Maseres

Baron MaseresMaseres
During his absence, Hector Theophilus de Cramahé, the lieutenant governor, ran the provincial government, with the aid of the first chief justice, William Hey, and the Attorney-General, Francis Maseres.
In March 1768, the Carleton government requested of him a report on the reform of the province's law system.

Richard Montgomery

MontgomeryGeneral MontgomeryGeneral Richard Montgomery
He was made colonel in 1762 and took part in the British expedition against Cuba, which also included Richard Montgomery, who went on to oppose him in 1775.
General Guy Carleton, commanding the British forces at Montreal, realized that the situation at Fort St. Jean was becoming desperate.

Capture of Fort Ticonderoga

captured Fort TiconderogaFort TiconderogaBattle of Crown Point
Carleton received notice of the start of the rebellion in May 1775, soon followed by the news of the rebel capture of Fort Ticonderoga and Fort Crown Point, and the raid on Fort Saint-Jean.
Gage, writing from the besieged city of Boston following Lexington and Concord, instructed Quebec's governor, General Guy Carleton, to rehabilitate and refortify the forts at Ticonderoga and Crown Point.

Quebec Act

Quebec Act of 1774Province of QuebecQuebec Act, 1774
The merchants would later be agent for e.g. the Quebec Act of 1774 (14 Geo.
To secure the allegiance of the approximately 90,000 Canadiens to the British crown, first Governor James Murray and later Governor Guy Carleton promoted the need for change.

Carleton University

CarletonCarlton UniversitySt. Patrick's College
Carleton County, in turn, was named in honour of Guy Carleton, 1st Baron Dorchester, who served as Governor General of The Canadas from 1786 to 1796.

William Hey (Chief Justice)

William Hey
During his absence, Hector Theophilus de Cramahé, the lieutenant governor, ran the provincial government, with the aid of the first chief justice, William Hey, and the Attorney-General, Francis Maseres.
In 1769 the views of Hay, Maseres and the Governor Guy Carleton were relayed back to London.

Dorchester, New Brunswick

DorchesterDorchester Consolidated SchoolDorchester
It is named for Guy Carleton, 1st Baron Dorchester, an 18th-century Governor-General of the old Province of Quebec.

Letters to the inhabitants of Canada

Letter to the Inhabitants of Canadaaddressed the inhabitants of Quebecan open letter to the inhabitants of Canada
In late 1774, the First Continental Congress sent letters to Montreal denouncing the Quebec Act for being undemocratic and for promoting Catholicism by allowing Catholics to hold civil service positions and reinstating the tithe.
Wide circulation of the letter was prevented by General Guy Carleton, then Governor of the province.