Gwalior

Coin of the Alchon Huns king Mihirakula, who ruled in Gwalior circa 520 CE.
The Maharaja of Gwalior Before His Palace c. 1887 CE.
Jain statues at Siddhachal Caves inside Gwalior Fort.
The Maan Mandir Palace at Gwalior Fort.
Map of the city, ca 1914
A King George VI stamp of 1949, inscribed 'GWALIOR'
Sambhar at Gandhi Zoological Park (Gwalior zoo)
The town hall situated at Maharaj Bada
Gwalior Junction
Tomb of Tansen
Captain Roop Singh Stadium
Girls Hostel, IIITM Gwalior
Front view of Madhav Institute of Technology & Science, Gwalior
Statue of Madhav Rao Scindia at MITS, Gwalior
ITM GOI Gwalior
Gwalior Fair
traffic outside Deen Dayal City mall
Jiwaji Chowk at Gwalior
view of Gwalior Fort from the Old city
Gwalior fort front side view
Rock cut images of the Tirthankaras.
The view of scindia palace from the fort
view of Gujri Mahal and nearby areas from Gwalior Fort
Teli-ka-Mandir
Jai Vilas Palace
Gaus Mohammad tomb
Sun Temple
Tighra Dam
Statue Guarding Entrance to Gujari Mahal
One of the Seven Gates of the Gwalior Fort
Gujari Mahal, now a museum, inside Gwalior Fort
Sas-Bahu Ka Mandir at Gwalior Fort
Former central press at Gwalior
Beautiful Chinese hand craft work on the walls of Gwalior Fort
Former Vidhan Sabha when Gwalior was capital of Madhya Bharat
Tomb of Mohammad Ghauz

Major city in the central Indian state of Madhya Pradesh; it lies in northern part of the state and is one of the Counter-magnet cities.

- Gwalior

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Indian Rebellion of 1857

Major uprising in India in 1857–58 against the rule of the British East India Company, which functioned as a sovereign power on behalf of the British Crown.

A 1912 map of Northern India, showing the centres of the rebellion.
India in 1765 and 1805, showing East India Company-governed territories in pink
India in 1837 and 1857, showing East India Company-governed territories in pink
Two sepoy officers; a private sepoy, 1820s
A scene from the 1857 Indian Rebellion (Bengal Army).
Indian mutiny map showing position of troops on 1 May 1857
"The Sepoy revolt at Meerut," wood-engraving from the Illustrated London News, 1857
An 1858 photograph by Felice Beato of a mosque in Meerut where some of the rebel soldiers may have prayed
Wood-engraving depicting the massacre of officers by insurgent cavalry at Delhi
The Flagstaff Tower, Delhi, where the British survivors of the rebellion gathered on 11 May 1857; photographed by Felice Beato
States during the rebellion
Troops of the Native Allies by George Francklin Atkinson, 1859.
Sikh Troops Dividing the Spoil Taken from Mutineers, circa 1860
Fugitive British officers and their families attacked by mutineers.
A wood-engraving of Nynee Tal (today Nainital) and accompanying story in the Illustrated London News, 15 August 1857, describing how the resort town in the Himalayas served as a refuge for British families escaping from the rebellion of 1857 in Delhi and Meerut.
Attack of the mutineers on the Redan Battery at Lucknow, 30 July 1857
Assault on Delhi and capture of the Cashmere Gate, 14 September 1857
Capture of Delhi 1857.
Capture of Bahadur Shah Zafar and his sons by William Hodson at Humayun's tomb on 20 September 1857
Wood-engraving depicting Tatya Tope's Soldiery
A memorial erected (circa 1860) by the British after the Mutiny at the Bibighar Well. After India's Independence the statue was moved to the All Souls Memorial Church, Cawnpore. Albumen silver print by Samuel Bourne, 1860
A contemporary image of the massacre at the Satichaura Ghat
The interior of the Secundra Bagh, several months after its storming during the second relief of Lucknow. Albumen silver print by Felice Beato, 1858
Jhansi Fort, which was taken over by rebel forces, and subsequently defended against British recapture by the Rani of Jhansi
Wood-engraving of the execution of mutineers at Peshawar
Marble Lectern in memory of 35 British soldiers in Jhelum
Lieutenant William Alexander Kerr, 24th Bombay Native Infantry, near Kolapore, July 1857
The Relief of Lucknow by Thomas Jones Barker
British soldiers looting Qaisar Bagh, Lucknow, after its recapture (steel engraving, late 1850s)
Execution of mutineers by blowing from a gun by the British, 8 September 1857.
Justice, a print by Sir John Tenniel in a September 1857 issue of Punch
Bahadur Shah Zafar (the last Mughal emperor) in Delhi, awaiting trial by the British for his role in the Uprising. Photograph by Robert Tytler and Charles Shepherd, May 1858
The proclamation to the "Princes, Chiefs, and People of India," issued by Queen Victoria on 1 November 1858. "We hold ourselves bound to the natives of our Indian territories by the same obligation of duty which bind us to all our other subjects." (p. 2)
Captain C Scott of the Gen. Sir. Hope Grant's Column, Madras Regiment, who fell on the attack of Fort of Kohlee, 1858. Memorial at the St. Mary's Church, Madras
Memorial inside the York Minster
The Mutiny Memorial in Delhi, a monument to those killed on the British side during the fighting.
Suppression of the Indian Revolt by the English, which depicts the execution of mutineers by blowing from a gun by the British, a painting by Vasily Vereshchagin c. 1884. Note: This painting was allegedly bought by the British crown and possibly destroyed (current whereabouts unknown). It anachronistically depicts the events of 1857 with soldiers wearing (then current) uniforms of the late 19th century.
The hanging of two participants in the Indian Rebellion, Sepoys of the 31st Native Infantry. Albumen silver print by Felice Beato, 1857.
The National Youth rally at the National Celebration to Commemorate 150th Anniversary of the First War of Independence, 1857 at Red Fort, in Delhi on 11 May 2007
Henry Nelson O'Neil's 1857 painting Eastward Ho! depicting British soldiers saying farewell to their loved ones as they embark on a deployment to India.
Charles Canning, the Governor-General of India during the rebellion.
Lord Dalhousie, the Governor-General of India from 1848 to 1856, who devised the Doctrine of Lapse.
Lakshmibai, the Rani of Maratha-ruled Jhansi, one of the principal leaders of the rebellion who earlier had lost her kingdom as a result of the Doctrine of Lapse.
Bahadur Shah Zafar, the last Mughal Emperor, crowned Emperor of India, by the Indian troops, he was deposed by the British, and died in exile in Burma
The Jantar Mantar observatory in Delhi in 1858, damaged in the fighting
Mortar damage to Kashmiri Gate, Delhi, 1858
Hindu Rao's house in Delhi, now a hospital, was extensively damaged in the fighting
Bank of Delhi was attacked by mortar and gunfire
Photograph entitled, "The Hospital in General Wheeler's entrenchment, Cawnpore". (1858) The hospital was the site of the first major loss of British lives in Cawnpore
1858 picture of Sati Chaura Ghat on the banks of the Ganges River, where on 27 June 1857 many British men lost their lives and the surviving women and children were taken prisoner by the rebels.
Bibigarh house where British women and children were killed and the well where their bodies were found, 1858.
The Bibighar Well site where a memorial had been built. Samuel Bourne, 1860.

The rebellion posed a considerable threat to British power in that region, and was contained only with the rebels' defeat in Gwalior on 20 June 1858.

Madhya Bharat

Indian state in west-central India, created on 28 May 1948 from twenty-five princely states which until 1947 had been part of the Central India Agency, with Jiwajirao Scindia as its Rajpramukh.

Location of Madhya Bharat in India, 1951

Gwalior was the winter capital and Indore was the summer capital.

Gwalior district

One of the 52 districts of Madhya Pradesh state in central India.

Map showing the divisions of Gwalior district

The historic city of Gwalior is its administrative headquarters.

Gwalior State

Semi-autonomous Maratha state.

Gwalior state in 1903
The Maharaja of Gwalior before his palace by Edwin Lord Weeks.
Gwalior state in 1903
Ranoji Scindia, founder of the Scindia dynasty of Gwalior
Mahadaji Shinde
Standard of the Maharaja of Gwalior.
Company style painting of Daulatrao Scindia, c. 1825
Young Jayaji Rao Sindhia, studying English, 1846
HH Maharaja Sir Jayaji Rao Scindia of Gwalior State, General Sir Henry Daly (Founder of The Daly College), with British officers and Maratha nobility (Sardars, Jagirdars & Mankaris) in Indore, Holkar State, c. 1879.
Jayajirao Scindia, in 1875
Madhav Rao Scindia, about 1903.
Jivajirao Sindhia
Copper coins, minted in Gwalior, issued on the name of Madho Rao Scindia.
Jai Vilas Mahal was the seat of the ruling dynasty till 1947.

The state took its name from the old town of Gwalior, which, although not its first capital, was an important place because of its strategic location and the strength of its fort; it became later its capital, after Daulat Rao Sindhia built its palace in the village of Lashkar, near the fort.

Madhya Pradesh

State in central India.

Physical map of Madhya Pradesh village Tumen Ashoknagar
Matang was completely developed and manufactured by Vehicle Factory Jabalpur
Woman harvesting wheat, Raisen district
Performing Mallakhamba
Holkar Stadium in Indore.
Mesolithic rock painting, Bhimbetka rock shelters, a UNESCO World Heritage Site
Kandariya Mahadeva Temple, Khajuraho
Bateshwar temple complex, Padavli, Morena
Chausath Yogini Temple, Mitavli, Morena
Sahastra Bahu Temples, Gwalior Fort
Teli ka Mandir, Gwalior Fort
Shiva Temple in Bhojpur
Lakshmi Temple, Orchha
Brahma statue with various deities at Amarkantak.
Gwalior Fort, Gwalior
Gwalior Fort
Langur monkey (Semnopithecus dussumieri), Orchha
Tigress with cubs in Kanha Tiger Reserve
Tickell's blue flycatcher, Bandhavgarh National Park
Vultures in the nest, Orchha
Male nilgais fighting, Lakeshwari, Gwalior district
Narmada River
Son River, Umaria district, MP, India
The River Narmada flows through a gorge of marble rocks in Bhedaghat, Jabalpur
The Shri Ram Ghat on the Shipra River in Ujjain
Betwa in the Ashoknagar District of Madhya Pradesh
Children in Raisen district, Bhil tribe
Shepherds in Chambal
A young farmer in Umaria district
Young Baiga women
Bagh Print Traditional hand block print craft in Bagh.
A man playing flute in Orchha, with a white tilak on his forehead, and holy saffron-coloured clothes.
Sand sculpture by Sudarshan Pattnaik at Bandrabhan near Hoshangabad
Rajiv Gandhi Technical University's main gate
IIM Indore's aerial panoramic view
St. Aloysius Senior Secondary School, Jabalpur, established in the year 1868 is among the oldest schools in India

Its capital is Bhopal, and the largest city is Indore, with Jabalpur, Ujjain, Gwalior, Satna, and Guna being the other major cities.

Tomaras of Gwalior

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The Gwalior fort
The Jain tirthankara statues at the Gwalior Fort
The Man Singh (Manasimha) palace at the Gwalior fort

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Kachchhapaghata dynasty

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Sasbahu Temple, Gwalior
Matha (monastery), Kadwaha
Chausath Yogini Temple, Morena
Kakanmath, Sihoniya

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National Capital Region (India)

Planning region centred upon the National Capital Territory (NCT) of Delhi in India.

Gwalior (particularly Gwalior West), 340 km

Gurjara-Pratihara dynasty

Rajput dynasty that ruled much of Northern India from the mid-8th to the 11th century.

Coinage of the "Gurjara Huns" (Sri Vigra and successors), circa 700 CE. This is a style of Indo-Sasanian coinage, imitating Peroz I. Decorated with a crowned bust, and a fire altar with attendants on the reverse.
Yaksha Gomukha and his beloved. Gurjara-Pratihara, eighth century CE.
The Kanauj triangle.
Teli ka Mandir is a Hindu Temple built by Mihira Bhoja.
Mahishasuramardini, Madhya Pradesh, Gurjara-Pratihara, ninth century.
The Nilgund inscription (866) of Amoghavarsha mentions that his father Govinda III subjugated the Gurjaras of Chitrakuta
One of the four entrances of the Teli ka Mandir. This Hindu temple was built by the Pratihara emperor Mihira Bhoja.
Jainism-related cave monuments and statues carved into the rock face inside Siddhachal Caves, Gwalior Fort.
Ghateshwara Mahadeva temple at Baroli Temples complex. The complex of eight temples, built by the Gurjara-Pratiharas, is situated within a walled enclosure.
Bateshwar Hindu temples in Madhya Pradesh was built by the Gurjara-Pratiharas.

Nagabhata Pratihara I (730–756) later extended his control east and south from Mandor, conquering Malwa as far as Gwalior and the port of Bharuch in Gujarat.

Iltutmish

Shams ud-Din Iltutmish, (died 30 April 1236, (r.

Illtumish Tomb in Qutub Minar Complex
Coinage of Shams al-Dīn Iltutmish (AH 607-633 AD 1210-1235). AR Tanka (25mm, 11.07 g, 6h). Sind type.
Extent of Delhi Sultanate under Iltutmish; The Sultanate clearly expanded under Shams ud-din into Bengal, the outskirts of Tibet and south to the Gangentic plains.
Coin of Ghiyath al-Din 'Iwad, Governor of Bengal (AH 614-616/ AD 1217-1220). Struck in the name of Shams al-Din Iltutmish, Sultan of Dehli.
Obv: Crude figure of Rider bearing lance on caparisoned horse facing right. Devanagari legends: Sri / hamirah. Star above horse. Rev: Arabic legends: Shams al-dunya wa'l din Iltutmish al-sultan.
Obv:Rider bearing lance on caparisoned horse facing right. Devanagari legends: Sri / hamirah. Rev:Arabic legends: Shams al-dunya wa'l din Abu'l Muzaffar Iltutmish al-Sultan.
Qutb Minar was completed by Iltutmish
Hauz-i-Shamsi pavilion
Gandhak ki Baoli
Sultan Ghari

Over the next few years, Iltutmish suppressed a rebellion in Bengal, captured Gwalior, raided the Paramara-controlled cities of Bhilsa and Ujjain in central India, and expelled Khwarazmian subordinates in the north-west.