Gwalior

Coin of the Alchon Huns king Mihirakula, who ruled in Gwalior circa 520 CE.
The Maharaja of Gwalior Before His Palace c. 1887 CE.
Jain statues at Siddhachal Caves inside Gwalior Fort.
The Maan Mandir Palace at Gwalior Fort.
Map of the city, ca 1914
A King George VI stamp of 1949, inscribed 'GWALIOR'
Sambhar at Gandhi Zoological Park (Gwalior zoo)
The town hall situated at Maharaj Bada
Gwalior Junction
Tomb of Tansen
Captain Roop Singh Stadium
Girls Hostel, IIITM Gwalior
Front view of Madhav Institute of Technology & Science, Gwalior
Statue of Madhav Rao Scindia at MITS, Gwalior
ITM GOI Gwalior
Gwalior Fair
traffic outside Deen Dayal City mall
Jiwaji Chowk at Gwalior
view of Gwalior Fort from the Old city
Gwalior fort front side view
Rock cut images of the Tirthankaras.
The view of scindia palace from the fort
view of Gujri Mahal and nearby areas from Gwalior Fort
Teli-ka-Mandir
Jai Vilas Palace
Gaus Mohammad tomb
Sun Temple
Tighra Dam
Statue Guarding Entrance to Gujari Mahal
One of the Seven Gates of the Gwalior Fort
Gujari Mahal, now a museum, inside Gwalior Fort
Sas-Bahu Ka Mandir at Gwalior Fort
Former central press at Gwalior
Beautiful Chinese hand craft work on the walls of Gwalior Fort
Former Vidhan Sabha when Gwalior was capital of Madhya Bharat
Tomb of Mohammad Ghauz

Major city in the central Indian state of Madhya Pradesh; it lies in northern part of the state and is one of the Counter-magnet cities.

- Gwalior
Coin of the Alchon Huns king Mihirakula, who ruled in Gwalior circa 520 CE.

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The view of the Scindia School from above.

Scindia School

The view of the Scindia School from above.
Founder, Madho Rao Scindia, maharaja of Gwalior State, r. 1886-1925

The Scindia School is an Indian boarding school for boys, established in year 1897, and situated in the historic Gwalior Fort, in the city of Gwalior.

Allahabad

Metropolis in the Indian state of Uttar Pradesh.

Metropolis in the Indian state of Uttar Pradesh.

The Ashoka pillar at Allahabad (photo c. 1900) contains many inscriptions since the 3rd-century BCE. Sometime about 1575 CE, Birbal of Akbar's era added an inscription that mentions the "Magh mela at Prayag Tirth Raj".
Allahabad Fort, built by Mughal Emperor Akbar in 1575 on the banks of the Yamuna River.
Tomb of Nithar Begum (daughter of Mughal Emperor Jahangir) at Khusro Bagh.
Mahatma Gandhi at a January 1940 Congress Working Committee meeting with Vallabhbhai Patel and Vijaya Lakshmi Pandit at Anand Bhavan in Allahabad
Allahabad University, established in 1887, is one of the oldest modern universities in the Indian subcontinent.
Pilgrims at the Triveni Sangam, the confluence of the Ganges and the Yamuna rivers in Allahabad.
The Yamuna in Allahabad during the rainy season
A typical Indian peacock, found in Allahabad on a large scale
The Allahabad High Court is India's fourth-oldest high court
New Yamuna Bridge in Allahabad
MLN Medical College, the Government Medical College in Allahabad
Motilal Nehru National Institute of Technology Allahabad, a public engineering and management school
Anand Bhavan, owned by Indian political leader Motilal Nehru
A procession of pilgrims cross the Ganges during the 2001 Kumbh Mela in Allahabad

Famous landmarks of the city are Allahabad Museum, New Yamuna Bridge, Allahabad University, Triveni Sangam, All Saints Cathedral, Anand Bhavan, Alfred Park etc. The city experiences one of the highest levels of air pollution worldwide, with the 2016 update of the World Health Organization's Global Urban Ambient Air Pollution Database finding Allahabad to have the third highest mean concentration of "PM2.5" (<2.5 μm diameter) particulate matter in the ambient air among all the 2972 cities tested (after Zabol and Gwalior).

Mihirakula

The second and last Alchon Hun king of northwestern region of the Indian subcontinent between 502 and 530 CE.

The second and last Alchon Hun king of northwestern region of the Indian subcontinent between 502 and 530 CE.

The extent of Mihirakula and his father's empire is unclear. Above is a map based on a Gwalior inscription. It re-constructs Alchon Hun empire c. 500 AD, with its capital of Balkh near Oxus river.
Coin of Mihirakula. Obv: Bust of king, with legend in Gupta script (Gupta allahabad j.svg)Gupta allahabad y.svg allahabad tu.jpgGupta allahabad mi.jpgGupta ashoka hi.jpgGupta allahabad r.svg allahabad ku.jpgGupta allahabad l.svg, (Ja)yatu Mihirakula ("Let there be victory to Mihirakula"). Rev: Dotted border around Fire altar flanked by attendants in the Sasanian Empire style.
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The defeat of the Alchon Huns under Mihirakula by King Yasodharman at Sondani in 528 CE.

It confirms that Mihirakula rule extended to Gwalior.

Portrait of Toramana and Gupta script initials Gupta allahabad to.jpgGupta_ashoka_r.svg Tora, from his bronze coinage.

Toramana

King of the Alchon Huns who ruled in northern India in the late 5th and the early 6th century CE.

King of the Alchon Huns who ruled in northern India in the late 5th and the early 6th century CE.

Portrait of Toramana and Gupta script initials Gupta allahabad to.jpgGupta_ashoka_r.svg Tora, from his bronze coinage.
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The Kura inscription of Toramana. Starting "In the prosperous reign of the King of Kings, the Great King Toramana Shahi Jauhkha...". "Toramana" (Toramana in the Kura inscription of Toramana (1st line).jpg Gupta script: Gupta allahabad to.jpgGupta_allahabad_r.svgGupta allahabad maa2.jpgGupta allahabad nn.svg Toramāṇa, appears in the 1st line of the inscription
Gwalior inscription of Mihirakula in which Toramana is eulogized.
The Eran boar (left) on which an inscription relating to Toramana can be found.
The Eran boar inscription.
Coin of Toramana. The initials Gupta allahabad to.jpgGupta_ashoka_r.svg "Tora" in Brahmi script appear in large letters on the reverse, under the solar wheel design.
A rare gold coin of Toramana with Lakshmi on the reverse (circa 490–515), inspired from contemporary Gupta coins, such as those of Narasimhagupta Baladitya. The obverse legend reads "avanipati torama(no) vijitya vasudham divam jayati": "The lord of the earth, Toramana, having conquered the earth, wins Heaven".
Inscription Gupta allahabad m.svgGupta ashoka haa.jpgGupta allahabad raa.jpgGupta allahabad j.svgGupta allahabad dhi.jpgGupta allahabad raa.jpgGupta allahabad j.svgGupta allahabad shrii.jpgGupta allahabad to.jpgGupta allahabad_r.svgGupta allahabad maa2.jpgGupta allahabad nn.svg Mahārājadhirāja Shrī Toramāṇa ("Great King of Kings, Lord Toramana"), in the Gupta script, in the Eran boar inscription.
Silver coin of Toramana in Western Gupta Empire style, with the Gupta peacock and Brahmi legend on the reverse: vijitavaniravanipati sri toramana divam jayati. Similar to the silver coin type of Skandagupta for example, although Toramana faces to left whether Gupta rulers faced to the right, a possible symbol of antagonism. On the obverse the date "52" is also inscribed. A modern image:.

In the Gwalior inscription of Mihirakula, from Gwalior in northern Madhya Pradesh, India, and written in Sanskrit, Toramana is described as:

Man Singh Tomar

The Man Singh (Manasimha) palace at the Gwalior fort

Man Singh Tomar (IAST: Mānasiṃha) was a Tomar Rajput ruler of Gwalior who ascended the throne in 1486 CE.

Gwalior inscription of Mihirakula

Sanskrit inscription recording the construction of a Surya temple from stone on the Gopa hill of Gwalior.

Sanskrit inscription recording the construction of a Surya temple from stone on the Gopa hill of Gwalior.

Portrait of Mihirakula from his coinage. He is mentioned in line 3 of the Gwalior inscription.
The name "Mihirakula" (Gupta script: Gupta allahabad mi.jpgGupta ashoka hi.jpgGupta allahabad r.svg allahabad ku.jpgGupta allahabad l.svg, Mi-hi-ra-ku-la) in line 3 of the Gwalior inscription.

Gwalior is located in northern Madhya Pradesh, India.

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Alchon Huns

The Alchon Huns, (Bactrian: αλχον(ν)ο Alchon(n)o) also known as the Alchono, Alxon, Alkhon, Alkhan, Alakhana and Walxon, were a nomadic people who established states in Central Asia and South Asia during the 4th and 6th centuries CE.

The Alchon Huns, (Bactrian: αλχον(ν)ο Alchon(n)o) also known as the Alchono, Alxon, Alkhon, Alkhan, Alakhana and Walxon, were a nomadic people who established states in Central Asia and South Asia during the 4th and 6th centuries CE.

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The word "Alchono" (αλχοννο) in the Greco-Bactrian cursive script, on a coin of Khingila.
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his 7th century CE mural
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a 462-463 letter
Uncertain Hunnic chieftain. Sindh. 5th century.
Portrait of Toramana. He sacked Kausambi and occupied Malwa.
Mihirakula on one of his coins. He was finally defeated in 528 by King Yasodharman.
Mihirakula used the Indian Gupta script on his coinage. Obv: Bust of king, with legend in Gupta script (Gupta allahabad j.svg)Gupta allahabad y.svg allahabad tu.jpgGupta allahabad mi.jpgGupta ashoka hi.jpgGupta allahabad r.svg allahabad ku.jpgGupta allahabad l.svg, (Ja)yatu Mihirakula ("Let there be victory to Mihirakula").
Coinage of Sri Pravarasena, successor of Mihirakula, and supposed founder of Srinagar. Obverse: Standing king with two figured seated below. Name "Pravarasena". Reverse: goddess seated on a lion. Legend "Kidāra". Circa 6th-early 7th century CE
Portrait of Toramana II, from his coinage.
Alchon-Nezak "crossover coinage", 580–680. Nezak-style bust on the obverse, and Alchon tamga Alchon_Tamga.png within double border on the reverse.
Alchon devotee, Butkara I (construction phase 4), 5th century CE.
Fragment of a lid with a hunting scene, Gandhara, 5-6th century CE.
Coin of the Gurjara Confederacy, Peroz I type. Sindh, circa 570-712 CE.
The Talagan copper scroll
An early Alchon Huns coin based on a Sasanian design, with bust imitating Sasanian king Shapur III. Only the legend "Alchono" appears on the obverse in the Greco-Bactrian script.
thumb|Lid with Combat between a Man and a Lion. Cleveland Museum of Art.<ref>{{cite journal |last1=GHOSE |first1=MADHUVANTI |title=The Impact of the Hun Invasions: A Nomadic Interlude in Indian Art |journal=Bulletin of the Asia Institute |date=2003 |volume=17 |page=151, Fig.10 |url=https://www.jstor.org/stable/24049312 |issn=0890-4464}}</ref>
thumb|Box Lid with a Winged Lion, Gandhara, 5th century CE
thumb|Box Lid with a Lion Attacking an Elephant, Gandhara, 5th century CE.<ref>{{cite journal |last1=GHOSE |first1=MADHUVANTI |title=The Impact of the Hun Invasions: A Nomadic Interlude in Indian Art |journal=Bulletin of the Asia Institute |date=2003 |volume=17 |page=150, Fig.9 |url=https://www.jstor.org/stable/24049312 |issn=0890-4464}}</ref>
thumb|Box Lid with a Phoenix, Gandhara, 5th century CE.<ref>{{cite journal |last1=GHOSE |first1=MADHUVANTI |title=The Impact of the Hun Invasions: A Nomadic Interlude in Indian Art |journal=Bulletin of the Asia Institute |date=2003 |volume=17 |page=150, Fig.6 |url=https://www.jstor.org/stable/24049312 |issn=0890-4464}}</ref>
thumb|Silver coin of Toramana in Western Gupta style, with the Gupta peacock and Brahmi legend on the reverse. Similar to the silver coin type of Skandagupta. On the obverse the date "52" is also inscribed.<ref>{{cite book |last1=Smith |first1=Vincent Arthur |last2=Edwardes |first2=S. M. (Stephen Meredyth) |title=The early history of India : from 600 B.C. to the Muhammadan conquest, including the invasion of Alexander the Great |date=1924 |publisher=Oxford : Clarendon Press |page=Plate 2 |url=https://archive.org/details/earlyhistoryofi00smit/page/76}}</ref> A modern image:.
Alchon Tamgha symbol on a coin of Khingila.
Khingila with the word "Alchono" in Bactrian script (αλχονο) and the Tamgha symbol on his coins. <ref>CNG Coins</ref>
Silver drachm of Khingila (early portrait) without headdress, mid-late 5th century.<ref group="Note">For equivalent coin, see CNG Coins</ref>
Silver drachm of Khingila (mature portrait), Bactrian legend: χιγγιλο αλχοννο "Khiggilo Alchono".<ref group="Note">This coin is in the collection of the British Museum. For equivalent coin, see CNG Coins</ref>
Silver drachm of Javukha, mid-late 5th century.
Silver drachm of Mehama legend: “ṣāhi mehama", mid-late 5th century.
Silver drachm of Lakhana, late 5th-early 6th centuries.
Gold dinar of Adomano, Kushano-Sasanian style, mid-late 5th century.
Silver drachm of Mihirakula, early-mid 6th century.
Bronze drachm of Toramana II wearing trident crown, late-phase Gandharan style. mid 6th century.
Silver stater of Toramana II, Kashmir style, mid-late 6th century.
Bronze drachm of Narana-Narenda (possibly Toramana II) wearing trident crown, late 6th century.
Khingila as a young king, without headdress. Artificial cranial deformation clearly visible.
Vishnu Nicolo Seal representing Vishnu with a worshipper (probably Mihirakula), 4th–6th century CE. The inscription in cursive Bactrian reads: "Mihira, Vishnu and Shiva". British Museum.

At the head of the Alchon, Mihirakula is then recorded in Gwalior, Central India as "Lord of the Earth" in the Gwalior inscription of Mihirakula.

The Gwalior fort

Tomaras of Gwalior

<mapframe text="Delhi and Gwalior in present-day India" width="400" height="400" zoom="6" longitude="77.71" latitude="27.44">

<mapframe text="Delhi and Gwalior in present-day India" width="400" height="400" zoom="6" longitude="77.71" latitude="27.44">

The Gwalior fort
The Jain tirthankara statues at the Gwalior Fort
The Man Singh (Manasimha) palace at the Gwalior fort

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Dhyan Chand

Indian field hockey player widely regarded as one of the greatest field hockey player in history.

Indian field hockey player widely regarded as one of the greatest field hockey player in history.

Indian hockey captain Dhyan Chand at 1936 Berlin Olympics
Dhyan Chand in action against France at the 1936 Olympic semi-finals
Dhyan Chand scoring a goal against Germany in the 1936 Olympics hockey final
Dhyan Chand on a 1980 stamp of India
Dhyan Chand statue at Sipri hill, Jhansi

Chand studied at the Aligarh Muslim University, Aligarh and finally graduated from Victoria College, Gwalior in 1932.

Official portrait, 1998

Atal Bihari Vajpayee

Indian politician and diplomat who served three terms as the prime minister of India, first for a term of 13 days in 1996, then for a period of 13 months from 1998 to 1999, followed by a full term from 1999 to 2004.

Indian politician and diplomat who served three terms as the prime minister of India, first for a term of 13 days in 1996, then for a period of 13 months from 1998 to 1999, followed by a full term from 1999 to 2004.

Official portrait, 1998
Foreign Minister Vajpayee (far right) and Prime Minister Morarji Desai (third from right, front row) with US President Jimmy Carter during his 1978 visit to India.
Vajpayee with Russian president Vladimir Putin on 6 November 2001
Vajpayee meeting U.S. president George W. Bush in the White House
on 9 November 2001
Vajpayee's funeral procession moving to Smriti Sthal near Raj Ghat for last rites
Prime Minister Modi at Vajpayee's memorial, Sadaiv Atal

Vajpayee was born into a Hindu Brahmin family on 25 December 1924 in Gwalior, Madhya Pradesh.