Gyeongbokgung

Gyeongbok PalaceGyeongbokgung Palace Gyeongbokgung PalaceGyeongbokgung complexGyeongbokgung Palace complexGyeongbokgung Royal PalaceGyungbok PalaceKorean Imperial palaceKyongbok PalaceKyongdok Palace
Gyeongbokgung, also known as Gyeongbokgung Palace or Gyeongbok Palace, was the main royal palace of the Joseon dynasty.wikipedia
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Seoul

Seoul, South KoreaSeoul, KoreaHanseong
Built in 1395, it is located in northern Seoul, South Korea.
The Gyeongbok Palace, built in the 14th century, served as the royal residence until 1592.

National Palace Museum of Korea

National Palace MuseumThe National Palace Museum of Korea
It also houses the National Palace Museum of Korea and the National Folk Museum within the premises of the complex. Today, the Gyeongbokgung Palace is open to the public and houses the National Folk Museum of Korea, the National Palace Museum of Korea, and traditional Korean gardens.
The National Palace Museum of Korea is a national museum of South Korea located in Gyeongbokgung Palace, Seoul.

Empire of Japan

JapaneseJapanImperial Japan
In the early 20th century, much of the palace was systematically destroyed by Imperial Japan.
In early June 1894, the 8,000 Japanese troops captured the Korean king Gojong, occupied the Royal Palace in Seoul and, by June 25, installed a puppet government in Seoul.

Sejongno

Sejong-daeroSejong-roSejong-no
With Mount Bugak as a backdrop and the Street of Six Ministries (today's Sejongno) outside Gwanghwamun Gate, the main entrance to the palace, Gyeongbokgung was situated in the heart of the Korean capital city.
It points north to Gwanaksan and Bukhansan (Mountains), and the Joseon Dynasty palace, Gyeongbokgung.

Heungseon Daewongun

Daewon-gunDaewongunYi Ha-eung
However, in the 19th century, all of the palace's 7,700 rooms were later restored under the leadership of Prince Regent Heungseon during the reign of King Gojong.
One of the Daewongun's effective acts as regent was the reconstruction of Gyeongbok Palace.

Japanese General Government Building, Seoul

Japanese General Government BuildingGovernment-General BuildingCapitol Building
Following the exhibition, the Japanese leveled whatever still remained and built their colonial headquarters, the Government-General Building (1916–26), on the site.
The Government-General Building was constructed by Imperial Japan on the site of the Gyeongbokgung complex, the royal palace of the Joseon, and was the largest government building in East Asia.

Korea under Japanese rule

KoreaJapanese KoreaJapanese occupation
Due to its status as the symbol of national sovereignty, Gyeongbokgung was extensively damaged during the Japanese occupation of the early 20th century.
According to a Russian eyewitness, Seredin-Sabatin, an employee of the king, a group of Japanese agents entered Gyeongbokgung, killed Queen Min, and desecrated her body in the north wing of the palace.

Empress Myeongseong

Queen MinEulmi Incidentassassinated
In 1895, after the assassination of Empress Myeongseong by Japanese agents, her husband, Emperor Gojong, left the palace.
In the early morning of 8 October 1895, the Hullyeondae Regiment, loyal to the Daewongun, attacked the Gyeongbokgung, overpowering its Royal Guards.

Gwanghwamun

Gwanghwamun GateKwanghwamun
With Mount Bugak as a backdrop and the Street of Six Ministries (today's Sejongno) outside Gwanghwamun Gate, the main entrance to the palace, Gyeongbokgung was situated in the heart of the Korean capital city.
Gwanghwamun is the main and largest gate of Gyeongbokgung Palace, in Jongno-gu, Seoul, South Korea.

Changdeokgung

Changdeok PalaceChangdeokgung PalaceChangdeokgung Palace Complex
The royal court was moved to the Changdeokgung Palace.
As it is located east of Gyeongbok Palace, Changdeokgung—along with Changgyeonggung—is also referred to as the "East Palace" (동궐, 東闕, Donggwol).

Jeong Dojeon

Jeong Do-jeon
Gyeongbokgung was originally constructed in 1394 by King Taejo, the first king and the founder of the Joseon dynasty, and its name was conceived by an influential government minister named Jeong Do-jeon.
He was finally rehabilitated in 1865 in recognition of his role in designing Gyeongbokgung (main palace).

Chosun Exhibition

A further exhibition, the Chosun Exhibition, followed in 1929.
It was held at Gyeongbokgung, opened on 12 September 1929, ran until 31 October 1929 and was attended by 986,179 people.

Gojong of Korea

GojongEmperor GojongKing Gojong
However, in the 19th century, all of the palace's 7,700 rooms were later restored under the leadership of Prince Regent Heungseon during the reign of King Gojong. In 1895, after the assassination of Empress Myeongseong by Japanese agents, her husband, Emperor Gojong, left the palace.
The early years of the Daewongun's rule also witnessed a concerted effort to restore the largely dilapidated Gyeongbok Palace, the seat of royal authority.

Joseon Industrial Exhibition

In 1915, it was used as the site for the Joseon Industrial Exhibition with new exhibition buildings being erected in the grounds.
The exhibition was held in the grounds of the Gyeongbokgung palace and took place in both existing buildings, and newly constructed ones.

Gyeongbokgung station

Gyeongbokgung
* Gyeongbokgung Station (Station #327 on Line 3).
Gyeongbokgung station is the subway station nearest to the Gyeongbokgung.

Sejong the Great

King SejongSejongKing Sejong the Great
Afterwards, the palace was continuously expanded during the reign of King Taejong and King Sejong the Great.
In 1420 Sejong established the Hall of Worthies (집현전; 集賢殿; Jiphyeonjeon) at the Gyeongbokgung Palace.

National Folk Museum of Korea

National Folk Museum
Today, the Gyeongbokgung Palace is open to the public and houses the National Folk Museum of Korea, the National Palace Museum of Korea, and traditional Korean gardens.
National Folk Museum of Korea is a national museum of South Korea, located within the grounds of the Gyeongbokgung Palace in Jongno-gu, Seoul, and uses replicas of historical objects to illustrate the history of traditional life of the Korean people.

Blue House

Cheong Wa DaeCheongwadaepresidential palace
In 1993, after President Kim Young-sam's civilian administration was launched, the Japanese Governor-General's residence in the Cheongwadae compound was dismantled to remove a major symbol of the Japanese colonialism.
After the Joseon Dynasty (1392–1897) moved its capital to Hanyang, Gyeongbok Palace was built in 1395, the fourth year of the reign of King Taejo (r.

Jongno District

Jongno-guJongnoJongro-gu
Jongno District is home to palaces in which the kings used to reside and work, such as Gyeongbok Palace, Changdeok Palace, Changgyeonggung and Unhyeon Palace.

National Treasure (South Korea)

National Treasures of South Koreanational treasure of KoreaNational Treasure
The building was designated as Korea's National Treasure No. 223 on January 8, 1985.

South Korean won

wonKRW
Gyeonghoeru used to be represented on the 10,000 won Korean banknotes (1983-2002 Series).

Japanese invasions of Korea (1592–1598)

Imjin WarJapanese invasions of KoreaJapanese invasions of Korea (1592–98)
Gyeongbokgung continued to serve as the main palace of the Joseon dynasty until the premises were destroyed by fire during the Imjin War (1592–1598) and abandoned for two centuries.
The main Korean royal palaces Gyeongbokgung, Changdeokgung, and Changgyeonggung were burned down, and Deoksugung was used as a temporary palace.

Joseon

Joseon DynastyJoseon (Korea)Korea
Gyeongbokgung was originally constructed in 1394 by King Taejo, the first king and the founder of the Joseon dynasty, and its name was conceived by an influential government minister named Jeong Do-jeon. Gyeongbokgung, also known as Gyeongbokgung Palace or Gyeongbok Palace, was the main royal palace of the Joseon dynasty.
The early years of his rule also witnessed a large effort to restore the dilapidated Gyeongbok Palace, the seat of royal authority.

Queen Sinjeong

Jo Ha-yeonCrown Princess Jo
Jagyeongjeon, also called Jagyeongjeon Hall, is a building used as the main residing quarters by Queen Sinjeong, the mother of King Heonjong.

History of Korea

Korean historyKoreaancient Korea
Taejo moved the capital to Hanyang (modern-day Seoul) and built Gyeongbokgung palace.